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Hornets’ offseason not quite a joke, but not much better than that

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

At least Mitch Kupchak avoided the most biting wisecracks at his expense.

After getting fired by the Lakers in part for giving Mozgov a ridiculous four-year, $64 million contract, Kupchak’s first roster move as Hornets president was… trading for Mozgov. And maybe Kupchak is that delusional about Mozgov.

But Charlotte later flipped Mozgov to the Magic for Bismack Biyombo, who’s much better and paid only slightly more. That deal might have just fell into Kupchak’s lap, as Orlando is overloaded at center anyway and needed to aggregate salary to acquire Jerian Grant.

Still, Kupchak’s original sin with the Hornets stands. He traded Howard’s expiring contract and wound up with Biyombo, who’s due $17 million each of the next two seasons. That extra year of high salary could be disastrous.

Kemba Walker will be an unrestricted free agent next summer, and Charlotte has even fewer means now to upgrade its roster around him. Maybe a max contract and loyalty will convince him to stay, but at this point, Walker’s max salary might push the Hornets into luxury-tax range. That has always been a no-go for owner Michael Jordan, which means Walker returning could force downgrades elsewhere.

How appealing is any of this to him?

Charlotte could argue just shedding Howard’s presence will help, and it might in some ways. But he was also pretty productive on the court, and that counts, too.

Charlotte could also point out it got a couple second-rounders (plus $5 million) in the Howard-Mozgov trade and a couple more in the Mozgov-Biyombo trade. (The Hornets also got two more-second rounders by taking known Clippers target Shai Gilgeous-Alexander at No. 11 then trading him to L.A. for the No. 12 pick, used on Miles Bridges.) But those second-rounders don’t near the going rate for accepting $17 million of 2019-20 salary. The Hornets would have been better off just buying out Howard and ending their salary commitment after this season.

At least all those second-rounders are already going to good use. Charlotte traded two for No. 34 pick Devonte’ Graham, who looked good in summer league.

Graham could help with the Hornets’ biggest weakness, backup point guard. So could Tony Parker, who received $5 million guaranteed with an unguaranteed salary next season.

But that’s a high price for the over-the-hill Parker, and that money probably could have lured a more productive player. Surely, part of Parker’s appeal was his ability to help new Charlotte coach James Borrego – hired from the Spurs – install his system.

Borrego replaces Steve Clifford, who’s a good coach but wasn’t Kupchak’s guy. Kupchak is clearly putting his stamp on this team.

Kupchak is one of the most accomplished general managers of all-time. He built multiple championship teams in Los Angeles. But he also appeared out of touch late in his tenure there. Is he a good general manager whose bad breaks just happened to have come most recently, or has he fallen behind? It’s a question he’ll settle in Charlotte.

The early returns are not encouraging.

Offseason grade: D

Magic forward Jonathan Isaac‏ calls for more abstinence education

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In the NBA lately, most noteworthy political and social stances have been opposition to President Donald Trump.

But Magic forward Jonathan Isaac is taking up another cause.

Isaac:

This is a refreshingly nuanced viewpoint. Isaac makes clear he’s not advocating for abstinence-only education, which studies have shown to be ineffective. He just wants abstinence discussed more prominently among options, which seems far more reasonable.

It’s difficult to remove religion – clearly important to Isaac – from his arguments despite his stated intent of not factoring it. But that doesn’t invalidate his larger points.

I don’t endorse the absolutes Isaac conveys. But I also don’t mind him trying to influence the greater conversation, and I appreciate him speaking his mind.

Nets come out ahead in busy summer

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

Timofey Mozgov, Dwight Howard, Jeremy Lin, Kenneth Faried, Darrell Arthur, Isaiah Whitehead and Jared Dudley are real people with real thoughts, real feelings and real basketball abilities. But to Brooklyn this summer, they were mostly just contracts to be shuffled. After all their wheeling and dealing with that group, here’s where the Nets stand:

  • Draft picks (give or take): +1 first rounder, -1 second-rounder
  • 2018-19 salary: +$13,697,024
  • 2019-20 salary: -$16,720,000

That’s right: Brooklyn cleared more 2019-20 salary than it added in 2018-19 salary while still coming out ahead in draft picks. That is incredible – especially because the Nets’ cap space should go further with desirable free agents next summer than it would’ve this year.

But just because stars aren’t ready to consider Brooklyn doesn’t mean Brooklyn is ready to punt the season. The Nets, possessing their own first-rounder for the first time in five years, refuse to tank. They’ve already come too far building a culture to intentionally plummet in the standings now.

To that end, Brooklyn re-signed Joe Harris to a two-year, $16 million contract. That might be a little steep for him, but he’s a glowing example of the Nets’ player-development program, and his salary descends. This was a deal worth doing.

Brooklyn also signed Ed Davis (one year, $4,449,000 room exception), Shabazz Napier ($1,942,422 guaranteed this season with the minimum unguaranteed next season) and Treveon Graham (minimum guaranteed this season with minimum unguaranteed next season). I doubt they lift the Nets significantly, but those three are all worthy pickups. Napier and Graham, with those unguaranteed seasons, look especially valuable. Napier is just finding himself as an NBA player, and Graham has potential as a 3-and-D wing in a league starving for players like that.

The Nets also drafted Dzanan Musa No. 29 and Rodions Kurucs No. 40. There are a lot of pieces here.

The next step is evaluating which are keepers.

Brooklyn projects to have more than $61 million in cap space next summer. Some could go toward keeping D'Angelo Russell, Spencer Dinwiddie and/or Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, but that still leaves plenty to add a star or two.

The Nets endured years of pain – losing without reaping the rewards of a high draft pick. The light at the end of the tunnel is finally in sight.

Thanks to this summer, it’s brighter.

Offseason grade: B+

Nick Young, Corey Brewer reportedly will work out for Timberwolves

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Minnesota has a couple of open roster spots — they have 12 guaranteed contracts, plus a non-guaranteed deal for James Nunnally and he likely makes the roster — and they are looking for some added depth on the wing and at forward. For a lot of teams, those last couple of end-of-the-bench spots go to younger players the team is trying to develop and bring along.

Not in Minnesota, because Tom Thibodeau.

Minnesota is bringing in some veterans to look at, the well-connected Darren Wolfson of 5 Eyewitness News in Minneapolis reports.

Nick Young, Corey Brewer, and Arron Afflalo are all veteran guys who could provide some scoring punch off the bench (none of them defend that well anymore).

I say “could” because anyone the Timberwolves bring in at this point likely would be third or deeper in the mix at their position, which means they are going to spend most of the season on the bench because Thibodeau runs his starters into the ground. The Warriors found 17 minutes a game last season for Young, not because he was playing within the system or providing valuable defense, but rather because they knew he could give them minutes that would keep their stars rested and healthy for the long grind of the season and into the playoffs.

Is that going to happen in Minnesota? Either way, one or more of these guys could make the roster.

Grizzlies waive center Dakari Johnson

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MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — The Memphis Grizzlies have waived center Dakari Johnson after acquiring him from Orlando last month.

The Grizzlies announced the move Friday.

The 7-foot Johnson started six of 31 games as a rookie last season with Oklahoma City. The Thunder drafted him 48th overall in the 2015 draft out of Kentucky, and the 22-year-old played three seasons in the G League for Oklahoma City.

The Grizzlies acquired Johnson from Orlando in a trade July 23.