Justise Winslow
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Heat: Justise Winslow out at least two more weeks

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MIAMI (AP) — The Miami Heat say Justise Winslow will miss at least two more weeks while recovering from a back injury.

Winslow has played only once since Dec. 4 and is slated to be out for at least the remainder of January. The team originally called Winslow’s injury a back strain, then updated the diagnosis to a bone bruise.

Winslow played off the bench in Miami’s win at Indiana on Jan. 8. The team said the back problems reappeared after that game. He has not played since.

Friday’s game in Oklahoma City is Miami’s 41st of the season and the 30th that Winslow has missed. He’s averaging 11.3 points, 6.6 rebounds and 4.0 assists for the Heat this season.

PBT mid-season awards: Defensive Player of the Year, Rookie of the Year and more

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The 2019-20 NBA season reached its midpoint by games played last night. So, we’re naming winners for mid-season awards. Yesterday, we picked Most Valuable Player and All-NBA. Now, we’re onto the other major honors.

Defensive Player of the Year

Kurt Helin: Rudy Gobert (Jazz)

This is the hardest award for me to pick mid-season, but the Jazz put more on the plate of Gobert this season and he has responded amazingly (even if the Jazz’s defense is a little off from its usual highs this season). A lot of other players still in the mix here for me including Joel Embiid (if he plays enough games), Giannis Antetokounmpo, Jimmy Butler, Anthony Davis, Kawhi Leonard, and Marcus Smart.

Dan Feldman: Rudy Gobert (Jazz)

Even as reigning back-to-back Defensive Player of the Year, Gobert doesn’t have the final award sewn up. Anthony Davis, Giannis Antetokounmpo, Brook Lopez and Kawhi Leonard are in the mix. But in a tight race, Gobert gets the benefit of the doubt. Utah’s strong defense is built entirely around Gobert’s rim protection.

Rookie of the Year

Kurt Helin: Ja Morant (Grizzlies)

This is a runaway award, but not for the guy we expected to run away with it. Zion Williamson makes his debut next week and maybe he could climb to third in this race, but he’s not winning the award. Morant and his fluid athleticism have turned Grizzlies into must-watch television, and he looks every bit the franchise player. Kendrick Nunn is a clear second in this race.

Dan Feldman: Ja Morant (Grizzlies)

Some rookie point guards put up big numbers. Some rookie point guards produce electric highlights. Some rookie point guards show promising flashes of winning basketball. Few rookie point guards are actually good. Morant is actually good. His athleticism, shooting and overall offensive control form an incredible package for his age. Sure, Morant is sometimes too reckless. He doesn’t completely break the mold of a young point guard. But Memphis has a gem.

Most Improved Player

Kurt Helin: Devonte' Graham (Hornets)

Last season, Graham was an end-of-the-bench guy in Charlotte. This season, he’s averaging 18.7 points a game, hitting 38.7 percent from three and is the team’s best player. Nobody saw that coming and it’s a radical improvement. Also in the mix for this award are Bam Adebayo and Luka Doncic — yes, the MVP candidate, he as made a massive leap this season.

Dan Feldman: Luka Doncic (Mavericks)

It’s a two-man race between Doncic and Devonte’ Graham. As the reigning Rookie of the Year, Doncic will get overlooked. He’s a second-year player. He was supposed to be this good. BS. The leap into superstardom is generally more difficult than the climb from non-rotation player to good starter, which Graham made. For Doncic to get this good this quickly is unprecedented.

Sixth Man of the Year

Kurt Helin: Montrezl Harrell (Clippers)

Harrell was in the mix for this award last season and came back this season as a better defender and more efficient on offense. He’s a critical element for a contending Clippers team, and closes games for them at the five. However, this is not a decided race by any means, both Derrick Rose and George Hill deserve serious consideration. Also, Spencer Dinwiddie in Brooklyn could be in the mix, but likely starts too many games to qualify.

Dan Feldman: Montrezl Harrell (Clippers)

I nearly chose Harrell for this award last season. Since, he has improved his offensive skill and defensive effectiveness. His big role in L.A. gives Harrell the edge over another highly productive reserve, the Bucks’ George Hill. Derrick Rose and Harrell’s teammate, Lou Williams, also warrant consideration.

Coach of the Year

Kurt Helin: Erik Spoelstra (Heat)

This is a wide-open race and my spreadsheet goes eight deep with worthy candidates: Nick Nurse has done an impressive job in Toronto, same with Brad Stevens in Boston and Frank Vogel with the Lakers, and the list goes on. Spoelstra, however, leads for me because of a combination of player development — Kendrick Nunn, Bam Adebayo, Tyler Herro, etc. — and smart utilization of the players’ he has. Plus, Spoelstra is getting it all to mesh around Jimmy Butler.

Dan Feldman: Nick Nurse (Raptors)

Nurse kept Toronto humming when Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green left. Nurse kept Toronto humming when key players, including breakout star Pascal Siakam, got hurt. Nurse kept Toronto humming when unproven young players had to join the rotation. Nurse’s defenses are particularly exemplary – both his creativity and ability to get everyone up to speed. The Heat’s Erik Spoelstra and the Pacers’ Nate McMillan aren’t far behind.

PBT Podcast: Our NBA mid-season award picks for MVP, Rookie of Year, more

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Is it James Harden or Giannis Antetokounmpo for MVP?

Kawhi Leonard or Rudy Gobert for Defensive Player of the Year?

Can anyone catch Ja Morant for Rookie of the Year?

We’ve reached the midpoint of the NBA season, meaning it’s time to break down where the NBA’s awards races stand. Dan Feldman of NBC Sports joins me and we get into all of that, plus Coach of the Year, Most Improved Player, and the All-NBA teams.

As always, you can check out the podcast below, listen and subscribe via iTunes at ApplePodcasts.com/PBTonNBC, subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google play, or check out the NBC Sports Podcast homepage and archive at Art19.

We want your questions for future podcasts, and your comments, so please email us at PBTpodcast@gmail.com.

Gregg Popovich second-guesses cutting Bam Adebayo from Team USA

Bam Adebayo
Andrew D. Bernstein/NBAE via Getty Images
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Team USA was historically short on star power for the 2019 FIBA World Cup.

Relatedly, the Americans placed a historically low seventh – their worst-ever finish in a major event.

So many big-name players didn’t participate. USA Basketball looked helpless as star after star withdrew. What can you do when someone would rather stay home?

But the U.S. – coached by the Spurs’ Gregg Popovich – also cut Heat center Bam Adebayo, who now looks like a borderline All-Star.

Tim Reynolds of the Associated Press:

I appreciate Popovich’s introspection. Few coaches would publicly acknowledge the possibility of making a mistake like this.

Adebayo is among the NBA’s most improved players. It’s tough to pinpoint exactly when that growth occurred. Adebayo wasn’t necessarily the same player in August, when Team USA set its roster, as he was by October. Perhaps, getting cut motivated him and made him better.

For what it’s worth, the Heat seemed to understand Adebayo’s potential before the NBA regular season began. But they also had more opportunities to evaluate him.

That said, USA Basketball took Mason Plumlee to China. Adebayo really didn’t deserve to clear that bar for making the roster?

PBT mid-season awards: MVP and All-NBA

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The 2019-20 NBA season will reach its midpoint by games played tonight. So, we’re naming winners for mid-season awards. Tomorrow, we’ll pick Defensive Player of the Year, Rookie of the Year, Most Improved Player, Sixth Man of the Year and Coach of the Year.

Most Valuable Player

Kurt Helin: Giannis Antetokounmpo (Bucks)

This is how wide-open this race remains to me: a couple of weeks ago I would have said LeBron James led this chase, and a few days ago it was James Harden (and Luka Doncic could still be the one holding the trophy at the end of the season). Harden’s case is his 37.2 points per game scoring average, which the fourth-highest average in NBA history (trailing only three Wilt Chamberlain seasons) — and he’s scoring even more efficiently than he did a season ago. However, those numbers have slipped slightly in recent weeks, although that’s because defenses have adjusted and are throwing crazy double-teams at him. Antetokounmpo is averaging 30 points and 12 rebounds a game, added a three-point shot to his game, and has led the Bucks to the best record in the NBA. As it was last season, it’s the defense that separates Antetokounmpo — and this year LeBron, too — from Harden in my book.

Dan Feldman: Giannis Antetokounmpo (Bucks)

James Harden is averaging an astounding 37.2 points per game. That’s the start of his MVP case. But per 100 team possessions, Harden’s scoring lead over Antetokounmpo is a mere 46.4 to 44.9. Consider Antetokounmpo’s all-around advantages – especially defensively – and he deserves this honor.

Harden gets additional credit for playing more than Antetokounmpo. Those are minutes Harden is providing value to his team. But Antetokounmpo plays fewer minutes because he and Milwaukee are putting away teams early. Like Harden, Antetokounmpo is playing as much as necessary for his team to win.

LeBron James, Luka Doncic and Anthony Davis are also in the mix.

All-NBA

Kurt Helin:

First team

G: Luka Doncic (Mavericks)

G: James Harden (Rockets)

F: Giannis Antetokounmpo (Bucks)

F: LeBron James (Lakers)

C: Joel Embiid (76ers)

Second team

G: Damian Lillard (Trail Blazers)

G: Kemba Walker (Celtics)

F: Anthony Davis (Lakers)

F: Kawhi Leonard (Clippers)

C: Nikola Jokic (Nuggets)

Third team

G: Paul George (Clippers)

G: Donovan Mitchell (Jazz)

F: Pascal Siakam (Raptors)

F: Jimmy Butler (Heat)

C: Rudy Gobert (Jazz)

Every year I find All-NBA third team the most difficult part of the ballot — there are usually several players for each position very close in my mind, and those decisions by voters can have financial implications for the players. (Why players salary levels should not be based on media player votes is a rant for another day — but I have that rant ready.)

That’s the case again this season. I feel comfortable with the first two teams (although, obviously, things can shift) but the third team is challenging, and there are players not listed above who could make my end-of-year ballot. Karl-Anthony Towns is my fourth center but only because he has missed so much time and he likely gets back on the court soon (he has been phenomenal offensively when he plays). Bradley Beal could climb into a guard spot, as could Devin Booker or Trae Young (their defense still holds them back in my mind). Khris Middleton and others are hanging around as well.

Dan Feldman:

First team

G: James Harden (Rockets)

G: Luka Doncic (Mavericks)

F: Giannis Antetokounmpo (Bucks)

F: LeBron James (Lakers)

C: Rudy Gobert (Jazz)

Second team

G: Damian Lillard (Trail Blazers)

G: Chris Paul (Thunder

F: Anthony Davis (Lakers)

F: Jimmy Butler (Heat)

C: Nikola Jokic (Nuggets)

Third team

G: Ben Simmons (76ers)

G: Kemba Walker (Celtics)

F: Kawhi Leonard (Clippers)

F: Jaylen Brown (Celtics)

C: Joel Embiid (76ers)

Gobert and Jokic could go in either order at center. Because he has played less, Embiid had to edge out Bam Adebayo.

The final guard spot was extremely close between Walker, Devin Booker, Donovan Mitchell, Devin Booker and Trae Young. It’s splitting hairs.

Same for the final forward spot. Brown narrowly topped Jayson Tatum, Brandon Ingram and Domantas Sabonis

Pascal Siakam might have taken it if he stayed healthy, and he’ll have a chance to seize it the rest of the season. Paul George could also get in the race at either forward or guard if he’s healthier the rest of the season.