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Report: Suns’ top point-guard target is Clippers’ Patrick Beverley

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The Suns were reportedly targeting the Clippers’ Patrick Beverley, Pacers’ Cory Joseph and Nets’ Spencer Dinwiddie.

One of those point guards apparently stands above the others.

Stadium:

Shams Charania:

I’m told they’re targeting Clippers guard Patrick Beverley. He’s been at the top of their list.

The issue is price, asking price. Phoenix has only been willing to give up second-round picks in all their discussions for a veteran point guard, which they’re trying to acquire. And the Clippers, just like every other team that knows Phoenix needs a point guard, wants a first-round pick.

The Suns trading for Beverley could make sense. Phoenix badly needs a point guard, and Beverley could fit with high-scoring Devin Booker like he did with James Harden. L.A. has plenty of players capable of being lead guards – Beverley, Lou Williams, Milos Teodosic, Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Jerome Robinson, Jawun Evans and Tyrone Wallace – and has already gone toward taking a step back to this season to position for the future.

But a second-rounder if far too little for Beverley. If that’s all the Suns will offer, there’s nothing realistic about this.

On the other hand, an unprotected first-rounder would be too much for Phoenix to surrender.

Perhaps, there’s a middle ground – a protected first-rounder (with Troy Daniels used to match salary). It’s just a matter of negotiating the protections and determining whether there’s common ground.

Two rights trump one wrong for Pacers

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

If you recall my epically bad assessment of the Pacers’ 2017 offseason and stopped reading this year’s follow-up, I wouldn’t blame you. I gave Indiana an ‘F’ for trading Paul George for Victor Oladipo and Domantas Sabonis then constructing a roster that appeared doomed to miss the playoffs without landing a high draft pick. Of course, the Pacers had one of the NBA’s very best summers. Oladipo became a star and led Indiana to 48 wins. The Pacers even took the Cavaliers to seven games in their first-round series – the furthest an Eastern Conference team had pushed LeBron James in several years. I learned a lesson in overreacting.

But I once again see Indiana’s offseason as a tale of extremes.

The Pacers had two of the NBA’s best signings and one of its worst.

Evans is coming off a career year with the Grizzlies. Developing into a good 3-point shooter increases his value exponentially due to the off-ball threat. His playmaking will be particularly important in Indiana, as he could punish opponents for trapping Oladipo, a common Cleveland tactic in their playoff series.

O’Quinn is a savvy defender who strikes the right balance between protecting the rim and positioning himself for rebounds. He shoots well from mid-range and has become more comfortable as a passer.

And then there’s McDermott. He’s a very good spot-up shooter, but he’s pretty one-dimensional and a complete defensive liability. The 26-year-old should help this team. But at that cost? I wouldn’t bet on it.

Really, the question looming over the Pacers’ offseason was opportunity cost.

They also guaranteed hefty salaries for Bojan Bogdanovic ($10.5 million) and Darren Collison ($10 million) next season. Could that money have gone to better use? Or would waiving Bogdanovic and Collison and trying to re-sign them for less have just presented too much risk of them leaving?

Could Indiana have done better than Aaron Holiday with the No. 23 pick? He’s relatively established for a rookie after three years at UCLA, but higher-upside options were available.

The Pacers played it safe and emerged with an upgraded version of last year’s breakout squad. The only rotation players lost were Lance Stephenson and Trevor Booker. Evans and O’Quinn should be major upgrades. That makes McDermott just – very expensive – gravy.

Indiana is on track to enter next offseason with a massive amount of flexibility. Oladipo and McDermott are the only players guaranteed more than rookie-scale salaries, though Myles Turner could receive a contract extension this fall.

If the Pacers build on last season as they appear set to, they could be even more appealing to free agents next summer.

Offseason grade: B+

Has Lonzo Ball tweaked his shot? Video suggests he has, and that’s a good thing

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The Lakers tried to force a square peg into a round hole last season.

Lonzo Ball came out of UCLA an unconventional point guard — he pushed the ball in transition, kept the ball moving in the half-court, worked well off the ball (with the Pacers’ Aaron Holiday) and shot the ball well in catch-and-shoot opportunities because he had time to get his feet set and get the shot off. The Lakers had Ball running the pick-and-roll (29.2 percent of his used possessions, meaning a shot, assist or turnover), which was never his biggest strength, and while 22.6 percent of his shots were spot up (according to NBA.com stats) he was not efficient at them shooting 35.5 percent, and he struggled when closed out upon.

With LeBron James and Rajon Rondo on the Lakers now, Ball will have fewer half-court playmaking duties, but he’s got to be a real threat to score off the ball to stay on the court. He’s a smart cutter off the ball (or was at UCLA) but the shot has to fall.

Which brings us to the video of his reworked shot.

He’s still a right-handed shooter who is left-eye dominant, so he has to bring the ball across himself to get it lined up correctly, but he’s tweaked his shot mechanics to do that in a much quicker and more fluid way.

Will that translate to better shooting numbers from three? We will have to wait for some game action to find out, but he can potentially develop into a fit on this roster, a player who can contribute to a contending team. If not… well Josh Hart was very impressive at Summer League. The Lakers are in win-now mode, if a player can’t contribute to that their role will shrink fast.

Report: Andrew Bynum wants to make NBA comeback

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Andrew Bynum last played a game in the NBA in March of 2014. The former Los Angeles Lakers big man traveled around from team-to-team, first with the Philadelphia 76ers, then with the Cleveland Cavaliers, and finally with the Indiana Pacers.

About to turn 31 years old, Bynum now apparently wants back into the NBA.

That’s according to a report from The Athletic’s Shams Charania, and via a video of Bynum working out that was recently posted to social media.

Via Twitter:

Bynum doesn’t look as out of shape as he has in the past, although he is past his prime and could have a hard time finding his way back into the league. Set aside any personal issues for a moment, the skill-set that Bynum brought to the table half a decade ago is not as valued in today’s NBA.

Fold back in some of the personality and work ethic concerns that plagued Bynum throughout his career and it’s hard to see where he could end up. Then again the Lakers have signed just about every weirdo guy in the league to one team, so perhaps Bynum finds his way back to LA?

This is the exact kind of summer content we have been waiting for. It’s weird, it makes no sense, and the outcome is completely up in the air. I never want the regular season to start. Just give me more of this.

Rumor: Suns may target Patrick Beverley, Cory Joseph, Spencer Dinwiddie for trade

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The Suns want to trade for a point guard, and this summer targeted for some big names (Kemba Walker, Damian Lillard, Terry Rozier) only to strike out.

That doesn’t mean they’re done trying. John Gambadoro of 98.7 FM in Phoenix, who is connected within the Suns, laid out a number more rumors, via the station’s website.

Among targets, the Suns have discussed the Los Angeles Clippers’ Patrick Beverley, Indiana’s Cory Joseph and the Nets’ Spencer Dinwiddie.

First things first, these are the teams internally that the Suns would like to target, that’s very different from having an actual trade conversation with a team that goes anywhere. This is a wish list for Phoenix (and if I were with the Suns I would leak something like this to show the fans how hard we’re working, even if it wasn’t likely to come to pass).

All three of those guys are players in the final year of their contracts who maybe become available around Christmas or after if their teams struggle to start the season, or other players on their teams make them more expendable. However, all three also would extract a pretty big price to get, then the Suns would have to re-sign them in free agency.

Beverley is in the final year of his $5 million contract (which is not fully guaranteed, but the Clippers aren’t cutting him), and he is coming off microfracture and meniscus surgery on his knee that sidelined him most of last season. He is a guy other teams are watching because if he is healthy, and if the Clippers fall back in the West, they could decide to move more into a rebuild mode and make guys available (that is not a sure thing. However, owner Steve Ballmer is trying to get a new arena constructed in Los Angeles and may not want to lose a lot while going through an approval process with plenty of opposition).

Joseph is in the final year of his $8 million contract, and the Pacers have high hopes of not only making the playoffs but doing some damage there, taking a step forward off last season. With that, they have Darren Collison and rookie Aaron Holiday at the point as well — if Collison can stay healthy and if Holiday can show he is ready to contribute at a backup level now then maybe the Pacers will listen to offers. But those are two big “ifs.”

Dinwiddie is in the final year of a steal of a contract at $1.7 million. The Nets like Dinwiddie a lot and have some real decisions to make about the future of their point guard spot this season, primarily how much do they like D'Angelo Russell and how much are they willing to pay him a year from now as a restricted free agent. Even if the Nets decide they want to spend to keep Russell, they love Dinwiddie and it’s hard to imagine them moving him without a lot coming back their way in the trade.

None of these trades are likely, but it’s something to watch as we slide into the season.