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Another LeBron James mural vandalized in Los Angeles

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Most of Los Angeles — and the vast majority of Lakers fans — are fired up that LeBron James is coming to Los Angeles. They see a return to glory for the franchise (well, once they get the rest of the roster right… sorry Lance Stephenson).

However, there is a segment — particularly the die-hard Kobe fans — who are having trouble assimilating to the new reality.

So when an artist did a LeBron James mural near Venice in Los Angeles recently — a really well-done tribute — it was quickly vandalized. Then eventually covered up.

This week another artist did another impressive LeBron/Lakers mural — this one with LeBron looking up at the Lakers’ legends — and once again, it was vandalized.

I’m not shocked by any of this, but it is depressing. If you’re vandalizing art, you are a cowardly buffoon.

There’s no way to really know the motivation behind the second attack, although the smart money is on it being the same as the first one — a few people think they are protecting the Lakers’ brand by not welcoming the best player on the planet to a team that hasn’t made the playoffs in five years. It’s incredibly flawed logic, but frankly flawed logic has become trendy in recent years, it can get you elected to all kinds of offices.

Credit real Lakers fans who showed up to help fix this.

Michael Beasley reportedly joins Lakers on one-year contract

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Because a locker room with Lance Stephenson, JaVale McGee, and Rajon Rondo — with LaVar Ball circling around it — did not have enough distractions…

Michael Beasley, welcome to the Los Angeles Lakers.

It’s one year for $3.5 million.

Beasley is another eccentric guy for the Lakers’ collection. Remember when he changed teams from Minnesota to Phoenix and rather than move his stuff he just had a big estate sale and sold it all? Beasley by himself isn’t a distraction at this point, but all of those personalities in one locker room and… I do not envy Luke Walton right now.

Beasley had a solid offensive campaign for the Knicks last season, averaging 13.2 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.7 assists playing more than 22 minutes a night (he also started 30 games for them). He can attack off the dribble and score, gets to the line, and shot 39.5 percent from three — the man has embraced his role as a scorer off the bench and he can get the Lakers some buckets.

He’s also going to give up a lot of buckets because he does not play defense (he did rebound a little better last year, but that’s only when the guy missed despite his lack of D).

How Walton fits all this together remains to be seen. Beasley played 93 percent of his minutes last season at the four, where the Lakers will start Brandon Ingram but also rotate LeBron James and Kyle Kuzma through. Guys are versitle and basketball is evolving to being positionless, but that’s a lot of guys eating up minutes for similar roles.

At the price they are paying, this is a decent signing by the Lakers. Beasley will get them points if he stays healthy (he did play 74 games last season). I’m sure Magic/Pelinka will sell this as “adding another veteran playmaker to our roster,” and they will ignore all the baggage that comes with it. All those guys are on one-year contracts, the Lakers are looking farther down the road at much bigger targets than the new guys in the locker room.

But man, that Laker locker room this season is going to be a piece of work.

Kawhi Leonard for DeMar DeRozan could be NBA’s first immediately clear and enduring star-for-star trade in nearly two decades

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In 2011 – well before DeMar DeRozan earned even serious All-Star or All-NBA consideration – Kawhi Leonard called him a “great player.”

In 2014 – before Leonard became Finals MVP and arguably the NBA’s best two-way player – DeRozan said, “If Kawhi gets his hands on you, you’re not going anywhere.”

Leonard and DeRozan were ahead of the curve on assessing each other, but the rest of us have caught up. Both players are universally recognized as stars. Traded for each other this week, they could fulfill the Raptors-Spurs deal as a rare trade that was recognized immediately and in hindsight as star-for-star.

Sometimes, we don’t realize when a star-for-star trade is made. Paul George for Victor Oladipo was a star-for-star trade, but we didn’t yet grasp Oladipo’s abilities.

Sometimes, we think a star-for-star trade was made and it wasn’t. Kyrie Irving for Isaiah Thomas looked like a star-for-star trade, but Thomas hasn’t been healthy since and the odds are strongly against him regaining star status.

I’m looking for trades immediately recognized as star-for-star and then stood the test of time. To set a parameter, both players were All-Stars before and after the trade. There have been just nine such trades in NBA history:

2008: Chauncey Billups for Allen Iverson (Denver Nuggets-Detroit Pistons)

I needed some way to define star-for-star trades, and this deal technically fits. But it completely violates the spirit of the exercise and is included here for only posterity. Allen Iverson deteriorated rapidly in Detroit. He made a couple more All-Star games from the fan vote, nothing to do with his remaining ability.

2001: Jason Kidd for Stephon Marbury (New Jersey Nets-Phoenix Suns)

Kidd pleaded guilty to spousal abuse earlier that year, perhaps opening the door for his exit from Phoenix. He was clearly the better player and only continued to prove it after the trade, leading the Nets to consecutive Eastern Conference titles.

Marbury was at least intriguing – four years younger and a flashy scorer. He was legitimately good during the two All-Star seasons of his career, his last in New Jersey and second in Phoenix. But he mostly confirmed he was a big-stats-on-a-bad-team player.

1997: Shawn Kemp for Vin Baker (Cleveland Cavaliers-Seattle SuperSonics-Milwaukee Bucks)

This actually looked like a star-for-star-for-star trade with Kemp (Seattle to Cleveland), Baker (Milwaukee to Seattle) and Terrell Brandon (Cleveland to Milwaukee). Brandon was coming off consecutive All-Star seasons with the Cavs, but he never regained that level. Kemp and Baker didn’t maintain it for long. Each remained an All-Star the season following the trade then never made it again.

Kemp was unhappy with the Sonics because he got paid less than Jim McIlvaine, who signed a seven-year, $33 million deal. The Collective Bargaining Agreement allowed no feasible way for Seattle to renegotiate Kemp’s contract, so he rebelled by arriving late to practices and flights. His weight ballooned in Cleveland, and cocaine and alcohol issues steadily derailed his career over the next several years.

Baker appeared disenchanted with the Bucks after they posted losing records his first four seasons, and Milwaukee feared him leaving in 1999 free agency. The result for the Sonics was far worse than the one the Bucks feared for themselves. Baker began drinking heavily in Seattle. Before, after and even during games. But the Sonics still re-signed him to a seven-year, $86 million deal in 1999 that proved to be highly toxic. Baker hung around longer than Kemp, but both trended sharply downward after this trade.

1982: Bernard King for Micheal Ray Richardson (New York Knicks-Golden State Warriors)

Coming off an All-Star year with the Warriors, King signed an offer sheet with the Knicks. Golden State matched and King planned to return. But just before the season, the Warriors traded him to the Knicks for Richardson.

Richardson was a perennial All-Star in New York, but the Knicks had tired of his attitude and contract demands. Unfortunately, this trade contributed to his spiral. While his agent negotiated terms with the Warriors, Richardson remained in New York and abused drugs. He didn’t kick the habit in Golden State and lasted less than a season there, getting flipped to the Nets. He got clean in 1985, winning Comeback Player of the Year and regaining his All-Star status. But it didn’t last, and Richardson was banned from the league in 1986 for his third positive test for cocaine.

King was no stranger to off-court problems himself. He won Comeback Player of the Year in 1981 after issues with alcohol and pleading guilty to misdemeanor attempted sexual assault (and facing more serious related charges). He starred for the Knicks a couple seasons, hurt his knee then was never the same player again.

1980: Dennis Johnson for Paul Westphal (Phoenix Suns-Seattle SuperSonics)

This is another trade that fits by technicality, not spirit. Westphal got hurt, crossed the wrong side of 30 and underwhelmed in his lone season in Seattle. He was never the same player again. But fans voted the popular guard an All-Star starter that year with the Sonics, anyway.

1978: Bobby Jones for George McGinnis (Philadelphia 76ers-Denver Nuggets)

George McGinnis possessed so much size, athleticism and natural talent, people always wanted more from him. So, every problem involving him in Philadelphia felt huge. He fit poorly with Julius Erving. McGinnis had some bad moments in the playoffs on a team with championship expectations. His practice habits were poor even when he wasn’t sneaking cigarettes.

Eventually, the 76ers had enough and shipped him to Denver for Bobby Jones.

Jones, still a star in his own right, was much more adept at fitting in. He made six All-Defensive first teams in Philadelphia. After consecutive All-Star appearances with the 76ers, Jones won Sixth Man of the Year on their 1983 title team.

McGinnis remained an All-Star his first year with the Nuggets, but his experience in Denver largely made everyone there miserable. Nuggets coach Larry Brown endorsed trading for McGinnis, loathed the forward’s practice habits then wanted McGinnis traded. Larry Brown changing his mind – who ever heard of such a thing? When Denver kept McGinnis, Brown resigned. But McGinnis got hurt and lost his confidence, and the Nuggets traded him back to Indiana, where he played in the ABA before signing with Philadelphia and finished his career.

1972: Elvin Hayes for Jack Marin (Baltimore Bullets-Houston Rockets)

Drafted No. 1 by the Rockets, Elvin Hayes led the entire NBA in scoring as a rookie. But four losing seasons later, Hayes and the Rockets were losing patience with each other. Houston blamed him for posting stats – 27 points and 16 rebounds per game – that were more gaudy than actually helpful. He blamed the team for putting so much pressure on him, it caused health problems.

Despite already having Wes Unseld – who actually won Rookie of the Year over Hayes – as a big and sharing widespread concern over Hayes’ mindset, the Bullets rolled the dice on Hayes anyway. Asked whether the trade was a one-for-one, Bullets coach Gene Shue quipped, “No. We get Elvin’s psychiatrist, too.”

The Bullets eventually realized what a steal they got. Hayes was an all-time great. In nine years together, Hayes and Unseld led the Bullets to three conference titles and the 1978 NBA championship.

Marin had just two All-Star seasons – the year before this trade and the year after. The Bullets just wisely traded him at age 27, in the middle of his short prime.

1968: Wilt Chamberlain for Archie Clark (Los Angeles Lakers-Philadelphia 76ers)

This trade is often listed as one of the most lopsided in NBA history – for good reason. The Lakers got Wilt Chamberlain, arguably a top-five-ever player coming off an MVP season. Philadelphia got the unmemorable trio of Archie Clark, Darrall Imhoff and Jerry Chambers.

But Clark was an All-Star, both the season prior to this trade and a few years later after the 76ers flipped him to the Baltimore Bullets.

Chamberlain declined from peak form in Los Angeles, but he remained excellent during his five years there and helped the Lakers win a title.

1964: Bailey Howell and Don Ohl for Terry Dischinger (Baltimore Bullets-Detroit Pistons)

The first star-for-star trade was actually a star-and-star-for-star deal. And Baltimore got the two best pieces in the deal.

The Pistons had just suffered through a miserable year – losing a lot while playing for a tyrant coach. Charlie Wolf imposed strict rules that alienated his players. Howell and Ohl were happy to leave town, and each remained very good with the Bullets.

Dischinger, 1963 Rookie of the Year, certainly seemed to be worth acquiring. And he continued to produce like a star his first season in Detroit. But he went into active military service, missed the following two seasons and returned a far lesser player.

Who could have predicted the escalating conflict in Vietnam would swing the Pistons’ fortunes so significantly?

That uncertainty is why we don’t know whether the Leonard-DeRozan trade will join this club.

Each player must make an another All-Star team. Leonard is a lock if healthy, but his quad issues are a huge uncertainty. DeRozan will turn 29, and he’s heading to the better conference. But he’s joining a well-coached team built to win now, and success will boost his chances. The NBA, with captain-picked All-Star teams, might even pick All-Stars regardless of conference. The league should also increase All-Star rosters to 13 players each, matching the regular-season active-roster size, but that idea has less traction.

There are so many variables.

But this trade has a better chance than any recently to fit my star-for-star criteria.

NBA Summer Power Rankings: Warriors still on top, but Lakers, Raptors climbing

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The dust of the NBA offseason has largely settled after the Kawhi Leonard trade — sure, Carmelo Anthony has yet to be released in Oklahoma City, but we know he will ultimately land in Houston — and between free agency and Summer League we have a sense of what teams will look like come the fall. So here are the “everyone is chasing Golden State” power rankings as we get to the end of July.

 
Warriors small icon 1. Warriors (Last season 58-24). The NBA’s best team improved this summer, which had some people calling it unfair and asking the league to change the rules. Which is wrong-headed, but that’s another story. The Warriors’ biggest move this summer was to secure Kevin Durant, and there was an under the radar decisions such as inking Jonas Jerebko. The Warriors were the one team that could patiently wait for DeMarcus Cousins to get healthy, then give him a reputation-changing platform, so he asked in, and that gives the Warriors options.

 
Celtics small icon 2. Celtics (55-27). Despite the rampant rumors and fervent excitement of some Celtics fans — “trade up for a top five pick” or “trade for Kawhi Leonard” — Danny Ainge knew he had the best hand in the East already, so he didn’t take risks. He largely stood pat. A Marcus Smart is not yet done but likely will be soon. The Celtics are going to get healthy (Kyrie Irving, Gordon Hayward) and key players will improve (Jaylen Brown, Jayson Tatum) next season. They will set the bar in the East and could be a threat to the Warriors thanks to that defense.

 
Rockets small icon 3. Rockets (65-17). The clear second best team in the NBA last season got a little worse this summer — it was not a disaster, but their depth and defense took some hits, and with the Warriors ahead of them there was little margin for error already. GM Daryl Morey did lock up Chris Paul (on a fair four-year deal). However, Trevor Ariza and Luc Mbah a Moute are gone now, and Clint Capela remains unsigned (he’ll be back, the question is the price). Carmelo Anthony can fit with them on offense (if he can accept a role), but he doesn’t help on the other end of the court (James Ennis will help there, some).

 
Sixers small icon 4. 76ers (52-30). They were a 52-win team that will be better next season because key players — Ben Simmons, Joel Embiid, Dario Saric — will improve, plus Markelle Fultz will get added to the mix. This team is well positioned and going to take a step forward. Maybe not as fast a Brett Brown and fans wanted — the Sixers went big game hunting this summer and came up empty — but they can afford to be patient. A big name player will come, eventually. It’s good to be a Sixers fans right now.

 
Raptors small icon 5. Raptors (59-23). Kawhi Leonard may not want to be there, but if he’s fully healthy — and that remains a question mark — Leonard elevates the Raptors up to a team with a legitimate chance to come out of the East (and that makes them a contender). That the Raptors were able to keep OG Anunoby and Pascal Siakam and Fred VanVleet gives this team depth and versatility. Nick Nurse, you’ve got a contender with an unhappy superstar on it, welcome to your first NBA head coaching season. Good luck.

 
Jazz small icon 6. Jazz (48-34). Of all the teams clumped in the West at seeds 3-12 (the potential for 46 to 52 wins), Utah is the one I trust the most because they will defend. Every night. Even if Donovan Mitchell plateaus in his second season, Utah has Ricky Rubio back, adds Grayson Allen, and should have a full season of Rudy Gobert protecting the paint (and Derick Favors back if he does miss some time). Plus, I trust Quin Snyder to keep them sharp and competing night in and night out.

 
Thunder small icon 7. Thunder (48-34 LW 9).. OKC got their biggest prize — Paul George chose them, and that makes the Thunder a threat for years to come. They are soon going to lose Carmelo Anthony, which helps their defense (but dings them on offense a little). The Russell Westbrook/George/Andre Roberson/Steven Adams foursome is as good as you’ll find in the league, but they still need to find some depth around those guys. I like re-signing Jerami Grant and Raymond Felton, but that’s not enough.

 
Lakers small icon 8. Lakers (35-47). Los Angeles won the summer — they landed LeBron James. He should pair well with Brandon Ingram and Kyle Kuzma (and better with Lonzo Ball than some think), but every other move was far more about keeping cap space and flexibility to get another star than it was winning now. Magic may say he wanted winners/playmakers, he’s going to grasp the need for shooters fast. Rajon Rondo is good when he cares, JaVale McGee can fill a role, but Lance Stephenson is a head scratcher. This is a playoff team as constructed, but expect more moves.

 
Spurs small icon 9. Spurs (47-35). They did not hit a home run in their trade with the Raptors, but they got what they wanted — an All-NBA level player who can make them dangerous and keep them relevant for a couple of years (until Gregg Popovich retires and the rebuild starts). This team won 47 games last season basically without Leonard, DeRozan makes them a little better (at least on offense). No Tony Parker just feels strange. Adding Marco Belinelli will be a good fit thanks to his shooting.

 
Pacers small icon 10. Pacers (48-34). They quietly had a very good summer. Indiana added Tyreke Evans for bench scoring, Doug McDermott and Evans for shooting, some depth a the point with Aaron Holiday, and a bruiser in the paint with Kyle O'Quinn. Put them in the mix around Victor Oladipo and the existing core and this team could have home court in the first round.

Bucks small icon 11. Bucks (44-38 LW 18). Their smartest move of the summer was landing the best Xs and Os coach on the board in Mike Budenholzer, who should put all that talent in better positions than a year ago. Coach Bud will make Giannis Antetokounmpo better. The Bucks desperately need shooting and floor spacing and the additions of Ersan Ilyasova and Brook Lopez help with that, to a degree. Will they miss Jabari Parker? I don’t think that much.

 
Pelicans small icon 12. Pelicans (48-34). They lost DeMarcus Cousins and Rajon Rondo, but with the addition of Julius Randle they can better embrace the fast pace at which the team thrived the second half of last season (Randle can play with either Anthony Davis or Nikola Mirotic). There’s still not much to like about this team on the wing, but if Jrue Holiday can stay healthy the Pelicans will cause problems in the West.

 
Nuggets small icon 13. Nuggets (46-36).. The most important thing Denver did this summer was lock up Nikola Jokic long term, that keeps this team relevant for years, he is a cornerstone big man. Great roll of the dice on Isaiah Thomas, and if he is willing to take on the sixth man role he can thrive at a mile high. Keep Paul Millsap healthy this season and the Nuggets are a playoff team (and maybe even if he isn’t).

 
Blazers small icon 14. Trail Blazers (49-33). This was the three seed in the West last season and they are bringing back Jusuf Nurkic in the paint to keep their top-10 defense going. They added more shooting and depth with Seth Curry and Nik Stauskas, plus in the draft picked up Anfernee Simons and Gary Trent Jr. Despite rumors of a shakeup, there were no dramatic moves, which means team is still going to rise and fall with Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum.

 
15. Timberwolves (47-35, LW 13). They made a leap forward into the playoffs last season, but can they take another step forward this season? They lost Nemanja Bjelica and probably Jamal Crawford, and Anthony Tolliver does not make up for that. Bigger question: Will the strained locker room dynamics hold this team back? Will Jimmy Butler be traded? Can Andrew Wiggins find a way to fit his game into this roster this season?

 
Wizards small icon 16. Wizards (43-39). Marcin Gortat is out, he clashed with John Wall, so the chemistry issues in the Washington locker room should get better, right? Oh yea, they added Dwight Howard. They added Austin Rivers as well. The Wizards are solid, but Washington has never consistently lived up to its potential, what will make next season any different?

 
Heat small icon 17. Heat (44-38). Miami wanted to make a bold move this summer, but with no takers for the Hassan Whiteside or Tyler Johnson contracts, they essentially have to run it back with the Goran Dragic led team of a season ago. They kept Wayne Ellington, which was smart, but to get better Bam Adebayo and Justise Winslow need to make leaps. Everyone is keeping an eye on the decisions of Dwyane Wade and Udonis Haslem, will they retire?

 
Mavericks small icon 18. Mavericks (24-58). Dallas is not coasting through Dirk Nowitzki’s final season (although they will use that to sell tickets at every turn). They made the move of the draft getting Luka Doncic, then made an aggressive move to land DeAndre Jordan at center. Pair those two with Dennis Smith Jr., Harrison Barnes, Wesley Matthews, and Nowitzki and you have a team that could have one of the biggest single-season leaps in wins in a long time, and maybe make the playoffs in the West.

 
Grizzlies small icon 19. Grizzlies (22-60). They are not tanking, on the orders of ownership they are aiming for the postseason. The Grizzlies had a strong offseason adding Jaren Jackson Jr. (maybe the best player of the draft at Summer League), Jevon Carter, and through free agency Kyle Anderson and Omri Casspi. The real question to how good the Grizzlies can be comes down to one simple thing: How many games can Mike Conley and Marc Gasol stay healthy and play together? If that number is north of 65, the playoffs are not out of the question.

Pistons small icon 20. Pistons (39-43). Stan Van Gundy is out and Dwane Casey is in as coach, but what is he going to do with a roster built around Blake Griffin, Andre Drummond, and Reggie Jackson. If those three stay healthy this can be a playoff team in the East, but would you bet on that health? If Casey can get more out of Stanley Johnson and Luke Kennard that would help this team considerably.

 
Clippers small icon 21. Clippers (42-40). Despite losing Chris Paul, Blake Griffin, JJ Redick, DeAndre Jordan and Jamal Crawford — all in just more than a year — the Clippers are not going into rebuild mode. They have a roster of good players with Tobias Harris, Marcin Gortat, Danilo Gallinari, Avery Bradley, Lou Williams, Patrick Beverly and more, but everything has to go right for them to make the playoffs. Rookie Shai Gilgeous-Alexander impressed in Las Vegas.

 
Hornets small icon 22. Hornets (36-46). It still feels like “Kemba Walker vs. the World” in Charlotte. They have gotten a little better around the fringes — Dwight Howard is out and Bismack Biyombo is in, Malid Monk impressed in limited Summer League run, and they add Miles Bridges — but it’s on new coach James Barego to get more out of them somehow. Seeing Tony Parker in teal rather than black and silver is just going to look strange.

 
Bulls small icon 23. Bulls (27-55).. They have more than $38 million wrapped up next season in guys coming off ACL surgeries in Zach LaVine and Jabari Parker, which is a big gamble. Wendell Carter Jr. showed real promise — on both ends of the floor — in Summer League. Put all of them with Lauri Markkanen (and Kris Dunn) and you have a team that can score buckets but is not going to stop anybody. If this team doesn’t rise up this year, Fred Holberg’s seat is going to get warm.

 
Cavaliers small icon 24. Cavaliers (50-32). LeBron James is gone, and while they say they want to compete shouldn’t take long for owner Dan Gilbert to fully embrace the rebuild and trade Kyle Korver, Kevin Love, Tristan Thompson and every other veteran. After that, they can see what a young core of Collin Sexton, Larry Nance Jr., Cedi Osman and the rest can do.

 
Knicks small icon 25. Knicks (29-53, LW 22). There was good news out of Summer League, where Kevin Knox showed a lot of potential with his athleticism, and Mitchell Robinson averaged 13 points and four blocks a game. The bad news, Frank Ntilikina looked pedestrian (not good for a second-year player). With Kristaps Porzingis out likely at least half the season (and he could miss it all) this team isn’t going anywhere this year, it’s about development.

 
Magic small icon 26. Magic (25-57). For the first time in a long time, the Orlando Magic are going to be interesting. They re-signed Aaron Gordon, and at Summer League the young front line of Jonathan Isaac and Mohamed Bamba showed a lot of defensive potential. Throw Jonathan Simmons in the mix with defensive-minded coach Steve Clifford, and the Magic should get plenty of stops. The offense will be a work in progress, but the Magic will be a team worth watching.

 
Suns small icon 27. Suns (21-61). Phoenix did the smart things this summer: they locked up Devin Booker and drafted Deandre Ayton No. 1. They can roll out an interesting young core — Booker, Mikal Bridges, Josh Jackson, and Ayton that will be fun to watch, and Trevor Ariza will provide some locker room guidance (although at $15 million the question is why?). The rebuilding plan is starting to take shape, and their could be an interesting team to watch (except at point guard).

 
Kings small icon 28. Kings (27-55). They can roll out an interesting young core of De’Aaron Fox, Bogdan Bogdanovic, Buddy Hield, Justin Jackson, Harry Giles (who looked solid at Summer League), and maybe the best of them all Marvin Bagley III. They are rebuilding and not going to win a lot of games yet, but there is some potential there. Also, the Kings still have more than $20 million in cap space, expect them to do something with it (they can take on a bad contract for a first-round pick, if they want).

 
Nets small icon 29. Nets (28-54). Just what will Brooklyn get out of D’Angelo Russell in a contract year? It’s an interesting story line in Brooklyn, along with watching the development of Jarrett Allen at center and Rondae Hollis-Jefferson. New GM Sean Marks has done a great job digging Brooklyn out of the hole the last administration dug, now he can really put his vision together for this rebuilding team.

 
Hawks small icon 30. Hawks (24-58). Trae Young was down then up at Summer League, eventually adapting to the length and athleticism of defenders at that level — but come October that level is going to take another massive jump. John Collins at center impressed a lot at Summer League, he could be a future star. Will the Hawks get anything out of Jeremy Lin (between him and Dennis Schroder, someone is getting traded). Embrace the rebuild, Hawks fans: It’s going to be a rough year, but look for signs of growth and hope.

Report: Jahlil Okafor, still trying to land contract, works out for four teams in Vegas

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Jahlil Okafor was never going to find a new home early in free agency. Once the big names — and second tier, and third tier— names shook out, then some team was expected to step forward with a minimum contract and see if the former No. 3 pick could find a role on their team. Something he could not do with the Nets last year.

He’s still waiting.

Okafor did work out for teams in Las Vegas, to show that he is healthy and can contribute, reports Sean Deveny of The Sporting News.

According to sources, Okafor, the No. 3 pick in the 2015 NBA Draft, worked out for four teams last Wednesday in Las Vegas, and remains hopeful of signing with a team ahead of training camp next fall.

Okafor averaged 17.5 points per game as a rookie in Philadelphia in 2015-16. He has spent the last few months working out in Miami with trainers David Alexander and Idan Ravin, fueling speculation that he could land with the Heat, especially if Miami finds a trading partner for Hassan Whiteside.

First things first, it’s unlikely the Heat will find someone to take on Whiteside right now, and any team that does is going to want a treasure chest of sweeteners the Heat may not want to surrender.

In addition to the Heat, the Bulls and Pacers have been rumored to have some interest, although both of those should be taken with a serious grain of salt.

How much is any team interested? Enough to even offer a fully guaranteed contract for next season?

Maybe not. Okafor — with his old-school, below the rim, back-to-the-basket offensive game, not to mention a serious lack of defense — does not fit the direction the NBA is trending with bigs. He may need to accept a non-guaranteed invite to training camp somewhere and prove he deserves a roster spot. Humbling, to be sure, but reality.

At some point, some team will give him a shot. Probably. But Okafor has a lot of work to do to find a role in the modern NBA.