NBA COVID-19
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Unknown long-term effects of COVID-19 has team execs concerned

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Doctors and scientists studying the coronavirus and COVID-19 are concluding this is not a respiratory disease, but a vascular one. That means the virus does not attach in the lungs and the airway, like the influenza virus; instead, this coronavirus attaches to blood vessels. This means any area of the body where there are smaller blood vessels — the heart, lungs, kidney, brain, and more — is at risk of long-term damage from mini-clots in those vessels (something found in autopsies of some COVID-19 victims).

The heart issues in particular — and everything we don’t know about a virus that is still only about 10 months old — has NBA team executives concerned about the long-term effects on players as they head to Orlando for the restart of the season.

Baxter Holmes of ESPN had fantastic insight on this subject, speaking to team officials for his story.

“There are unknown effects it has on lung capacity, unknown effects it has on cardiac health,” said one general manager of a team entering the NBA bubble, speaking on the condition of anonymity. “What if a 24-year-old catches it in Orlando and, in 14 days, he quarantines and is fine, but then he has these everlasting heart problems? [Or he] gets winded so easily, or he becomes a little bit too susceptible to fatigue? … These are all the unknowns.”

The NBA and the NBPA were particularly focused on the heart and cardiac concerns based on studies that found exercise while ill by people who had even a mild form of COVID-19 increased the risk of heart issues. The NBA’s director of sports medicine John DiFiori put it this way (as general advice) in the ESPN story:

“If you don’t feel well, don’t try to push through this. This is not a situation where anyone, whether you’re an athlete or not, should try to push through or minimize symptoms or try to ignore symptoms and try to push through to try to continue to work or continue to play a sport.”

What that means for players is if they test positive in the Orlando bubble they will be put on a two-week quarantine without exercise or much activity. The challenge then becomes that once said player is cleared they will have lost some conditioning and need to work out to get in shape again — they cannot just step back onto an NBA court and play. The bottom line, if a player tests positive they may be out more than only two weeks.

Ultimately, doctors know little about the long-term impacts of the disease on the body because this strain is so young — even the first people in China who had COVID-19 and recovered did so fewer than nine months ago. There are concerns about impacts on the heart and lung — not to mention other areas of the body — and far more questions than answers.

Which is why the NBA and players union want to be cautious. And why team executives are concerned.

Home to three Pistons titles, the Palace of Auburn Hills demolished

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One of Michigan’s most beloved sports and entertainment venues was turned into rubble on Saturday with a series of controlled explosions.

The shell and roof of the Palace of Auburn Hills, which was home to three championship Detroit Pistons teams and three Detroit Shock teams and played host to some of the world’s biggest musical acts during its nearly 30-year run, crumbled to the ground following a series explosive pops.

The rest of the arena had already been removed.

The Palace, which opened in 1988, held more than 22,000 people for NBA games and up to 23,000 for concerts and other shows, according to nba.com.

After the Pistons relocated in 2017 to downtown Detroit, the arena about 30 miles (48 kilometers) northwest of the city continued to host concerts and music events, the last in September 2017 by rocker Bob Seger.

It also became the second suburban Detroit arena that found little real use after its main sports tenant took its games back to the city.

The Detroit Lions played at the nearby Pontiac Silverdome from 1975-2001 before moving to Ford Field in Detroit. The Pistons also called the Silverdome home for a decade before The Palace opened.

The Silverdome was taken down with a partial implosion in 2017.

William Hall, a project manager for Schostak Brothers & Co., told the Oakland Press of Pontiac that the Palace site should be cleared of debris by the end of the year.

A new mixed-use development project is planned for the site.

“There have been some companies we’ve already talked to about possible development of the property,” Hall said. “I would say we’ve had conversations with at least half-a-dozen people. This property is very interesting and for a lot of businesses, its proximity is very attractive.”

Boston ‘going to move very slowly’ with Kemba Walker return to play

Kemba Walker Boston
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For Boston and Kemba Walker, the target is the playoffs, not the eight seeding games running up to the postseason.

Which is why the Celtics are going to be cautious with Walker and his troublesome left knee, do a little load management early, and target the postseason for him to go all out, coach Brad Stevens told reporters, via A. Sherrod Blakely of NBC Sports Boston.

“We’re going to move very slowly with Kemba Walker and let him strengthen (the left knee),” said Celtics head coach Brad Stevens following the team’s first practice in Orlando, Fla. on Friday. “And make sure that he’s all good to go as we enter the seeding games and obviously, the playoffs.”

Stevens suggested a minutes limit for Walker during the seeding games.

Walker missed 14 games this season and lingering left knee soreness was an issue — the team was already looking at getting him time off before the coronavirus put the season on hold. Walker said last week that four-month break gave his knee time to heal up and get healthy. Like a lot of players, Walker is eager to get back at it.

Stevens is smart easing Walker back into action, there is no need to push things. Boston needs Kemba Walker in the playoffs, the seeding games are not as vital (Boston just needs to not give up te 2.5 games to Miami and slide out of the three seed).

The Celtics enter the Orlando restart bubble as maybe the biggest threat in the East to Milwaukee. They bring an athletic and switchable lineup (Kemba Walker, Jayson Tatum, Jaylen Brown, and Gordon Hayward, with Marcus Smart off the bench) that was top five in the league defensively and can score. There is a lot to like if the Celtics can get their rhythm back, and if Tatum can keep up the All-NBA level of play he had the last month or so of the season.

Boston also will need a healthy Kemba Walker or that. So he will get eased back into play.

Celtics assistant Kara Lawson hired as Duke women’s basketball head coach

Celtics assistant coach Kara Lawson
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Grizzlies assistant coach Niele Ivey left for Notre Dame.

Now, the NBA is losing another assistant coach to women’s college basketball – the Celtics’ Kara Lawson.

Duke:

There’s a pipeline developing between female NBA assistant coaches and women’s college basketball. Florida also pursued Spurs assistant Becky Hammon a few years ago.

If Lawson and Ivey want to become NBA head coaches, this could be a step back. There’s a well-worn path from NBA assistant coach to NBA head coach. Jumping from women’s college basketball head coach to NBA head coach would be unprecedented.

But Duke women’s basketball head coach is a premier job, and it looks like a step up from her position in Boston.

Lawson sounded sharp as a TV analyst for the Wizards and, after getting hired by the Celtics last summer, quickly impressed in Boston. She’ll probably succeed with the Blue Devils.

If she does, that should create even more opportunities for her – including back in the NBA.

Last year, the Cavaliers hired Cal women’s basketball head coach Lindsay Gottlieb as an assistant coach. The pipeline can go both ways.

Mike Woodson reportedly has second coaching interview with Knicks

Knicks coach interview
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Let’s start with the reality of the situation: Every source where the Knicks are mentioned, every bit of reporting on this topic, says the New York coaching job is Tom Thibodeau’s to lose. He is the runaway favorite.

But if it’s not him, is it Mike Woodson deja vu?

The Knicks have done their due diligence in this search — they interviewed 11 people — and that now includes bringing back former New York coach Mike Woodson for a second interview, reports Ian Begley of SNY.TV.

Friday was Woodson’s second interview with the club. Woodson and all other candidates had initial interviews with the Knicks last month or in the first week of July. The Knicks’ second-round interviews are expected to conclude in the coming days. It is unclear if any candidates will be asked to interview a third time.

New York plans to make a decision its next head coach before July 31, when the NBA resumes its regular season in Orlando.

Woodson is the last Knicks coach to win a playoff series (2013, if you’re keeping track) and had a 109-79 record in the job. David Fizdale — the coach the Knicks fired this season — wanted Woodson on his staff, but management shot it down, reports Marc Berman at the New York Post.

It’s difficult to imagine Leon Rose‘s first big move as Knicks president would be to reach back in time and restart the Woodson era. That’s not moving the franchise forward.

But Woodson and the Knicks are talking.