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Kenneth Faried says the Nets were not honest with him

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Kenneth Faried is no longer a member of the Brooklyn Nets. The burgeoning young squad apparently didn’t have regular playing time for Faried, and things escalated between the former Denver Nuggets forward and the front office as the season went on.

Faried is now a member of the Houston Rockets, and he has contributed some during his first game in Texas. Still, Faried harbors some ill feelings toward the Nets, and made it known where he stood in an interview with the New York Daily News.

In particular, Faried said he felt Brooklyn was dishonest.

Via NYDN:

“It’s very frustrating. A lot of, ‘We’re going to play you when injuries,’ and a lot of, ‘We’re going to play you when in this moment, that moment,’” Faried said Tuesday. “Just tell me when you’re going to play me or tell me if you don’t want to play me. Tell me if you want me here or not. Because I’m a real honest player, I’m going to give you my heart, give you my all. And I wear my emotions on sleeve. I’m not going to be happy if you keep lying to me and telling me false statements.”

Faried appears happy to be in Houston, and remarked in the NYDN story about how coach Mike D’Antoni already came out and told him what his role would be moving forward.

His advanced numbers are still similar to what you’d expect from a player in his 20s, and although he’s probably never going to be the defensive guy you need, Faried is a useful rebounder and offensive guy for the second unit.

I’m glad Faried is happier with another team.

Paul George joined Knicks fans in cheering for Raymond Felton (VIDEO)

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There’s not much to cheer about at Madison Square Garden these days. Kristaps Porzingis is still not playing for the New York Knicks, and it’s not clear whether the team will land a big free agent like Kevin Durant this summer or strike out and continue their run of dismal play.

As such, it makes sense that New York fans are trying to keep themselves entertained, and that includes during Knicks games.

When the Oklahoma City Thunder came to town on Monday night, fans in Manhattan found themselves cheering for a former Knicks player on the Thunder bench. With the game out of reach, it only seemed appropriate.

In the fourth quarter, MSG started a chant for Raymond Felton, who played for the Knicks for three seasons over two stays. As cheers rained down from the stands, even Paul George got involved in the action.

Via Twitter:

George scored 31 points as the Thunder rolled New York, 127-109.

Mike D’Antoni: Not right NBA wouldn’t allow Rockets to trade Carmelo Anthony yesterday

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The Rockets signed Kenneth Faried, importantly to them, before their game against the 76ers yesterday. With Clint Capela injured, Houston needed another big against Joel Embiid.

But the Rockets had to open a roster spot for Faried. Their clear preference was trading Carmelo Anthony. Failing that, they’d release James Nunnally.

Houston agreed to deal Anthony to the Bulls but couldn’t complete the trade because the league office was closed, as is the norm on weekends and holidays (in this case, Martin Luther King Day). So, the Rockets dropped Nunnally, eating the remaining salary on his 10-day contract, increasing their luxury-tax bill and costing him the opportunity to play for a team that could use him.

Houston coach Mike D’Antoni, via Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

“I don’t think it’s right,” Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni said of having to terminate Nunnally. “There’s ways (the league) could have facilitated it.”

What happened to the Rockets was fair in that the rules were clear and applied equally to each team.

But I agree with D’Antoni. Games don’t stop for weekends and holidays. The league office shouldn’t, either.

Teams should have more ability to change their rosters on the fly, because games come so quickly. Halting business for weekends and holidays is antiquated. This is a global, multi-billion-dollar operation now.

The NBA can afford to employ enough people who review trades not to overwork any of them. It’d create a better product and make the sport operate more smoothly.

Three Things to Know: Carmelo Anthony to be traded, released, hit free agency. Then what?

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Carmelo Anthony to get traded, released, become a free agent. But then what? By the end of the day today (Tuesday), Carmelo Anthony will be released from Houston Rockets limbo.

And land in another kind of limbo — his future is not much more clear.

The Houston Rockets have agreed to terms and will trade Anthony and some cash to Chicago Tuesday. This deal ultimately saves Houston $6.2 million in salary and tax, and Chicago will net just a little under $1 million — everyone is doing it for the money.

However, Anthony is never going to put on a Bulls’ jersey. Much like his summer trade from Oklahoma City to Atlanta, this is just a move to find a team that could take him on then release him. Chicago expected to hold on to Anthony through the Feb. 7 deadline (on the off chance they can find a one-on-one trade for him) but not play him — the same on-the-roster-but-not situation he was in Houston. If/when the Bulls cannot trade him they will waive him on a buyout after Feb. 7.

Then Anthony will finally get his wish and be a free agent.

Then what?

Nobody knows. There are reports he has options for a landing spot, but if he had good ones he’d already be with that team. Clearly he is holding out for a better situation.

What would that look like? The Rockets prefer to have  Kenneth Faried in the rotation over ‘Melo at this point.

A contender/playoff team is going to ask him to come off the bench and play a role — something he was not willing to do in Houston. He felt his stature in the game — and ‘Melo is unquestionably a future Hall of Famer, and at his peak was an amazing bucket getter — entitled him to more than the small role the Rockets had for him. The problem is Anthony’s game no longer merits more than a smaller bench role. In Houston his offense slipped, he shot 32.8 percent from three, struggled to create good looks for himself in isolation, and was on pace for a career-worst .503 true shooting percentage. His defense remains a serious liability. His catch-and-shoot threes should improve, however, he simply cannot create efficient offense for himself anymore so he will be relegated to a shooter’s role. A role he does not want.

This brings us to the one team Anthony keeps getting linked to, the Los Angeles Lakers. (Which is more about LeBron James wanting to find his friend a good landing spot than the Lakers actually wanting him.) The role Anthony wants is currently filled on the wing by Kyle Kuzma — and Kuzma is better at it right now than Anthony can be (19.3 points per game, an athletic and attacking style that pairs well with LeBron). That means Anthony would have to accept a limited roll off the bench as a shooter, and he wouldn’t do that in Houston. Why are the Lakers going to cut a guaranteed contract so Anthony can battle Michael Beasley and Lance Stephenson for limited minutes?

Maybe a struggling team looking for a marketing boost picks up Anthony, although if you run a team with developing young players why take the ball out of their hands so Anthony can get up midrange jumpers?

A thin roster and injuries are likely to combine and find ‘Melo a home, which is why Portland — thin at the three and four — makes some sense on paper. But he didn’t want to go to Portland in the past and, again, will he accept a role on a team where Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum will have the rock most of the time?

Once the post-buyout roster shuffling ends, I expect some team will have a roster spot for Anthony, but the role is going to be limited. It’s hard to watch a great career end this unceremoniously, but here we are.

2) James Harden scores 37, but against a good team like Philadelphia the one-man show is not enough. James Harden is putting on a run for the ages — he has now scored 30 or more points in 20 consecutive games after dropping 37 on the Sixers in the biggest Martin Luther King Jr. Day game on the calendar. Harden is in Wilt Chamberlain territory with his scoring.

Harden has now scored 200 points over his last four games — and not one of those has come off an assist. Right now he’s the only reliable shot creator on the Rockets’ roster, he has to do everything.

Against a good team, that’s not enough.

Case in point, Philadelphia on Monday. Joel Embiid had 32 points, but more than that the Sixers had a balanced attack and good defense led by Embiid. The result was an easy 121-93 win.

Embiid was putting up points and had the highlight of the game with a chase-down block on Harden.

This is where the Rockets are right now: Harden is playing at an MVP level, but often against the better teams that alone is not enough. Rockets not named Harden shot 31.7 percent against Philly, and 17.2 percent from three. It was The Beard against the world, and ultimately the world is going to win that battle.

Expect more of these “huge numbers from Harden in a loss” games to come in the next few weeks, especially with Clint Capela out.

3) Klay Thompson lights up depleted Lakers for 44 points. No LeBron James. No Lonzo Ball. No Rajon Rondo.

No real chance of slowing Klay Thompson.

The guy the Lakers’ covet — and know they are not going to get because he’s not leaving Golden State as a free agent this summer according to every source around the league I talk to — hit 10 threes and dropped 44 on Los Angeles on Monday night. The shorthanded Lakers could do nothing about it.

DeMarcus Cousins had his moments in his second game. Not the most efficient scoring night — eight points on nine shots — but he had nine rebounds, five assists, and was +24 (and didn’t foul out this time). Defensively he drew a charge, made his presence felt in the paint, and on the other end even dove for a loose ball at one point that led to a Thompson three. Cousins has some conditioning work to do coming off a torn Achilles, but this game looked like a small step forward.

James Harden scores 37 but Joel Embiid’s 32 leads 76ers to 121-93 rout of Rockets

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PHILADELPHIA — Joel Embiid relished the chance to face James Harden, and wasn’t going to let a little back tightness stop him.

Embiid had 32 points and 14 rebounds to lead the Philadelphia 76ers past fellow MVP contender Harden and the Houston Rockets 121-93 on Monday night.

“I love playing against guys you guys say are better than me,” Embiid said.

Harden, selected Western Conference player of the week earlier in the day, finished with 37 points – giving him 20 straight games with at least 30.

Philadelphia played without four-time All-Star Jimmy Butler (sore right wrist), and Embiid more than made up for his absence.

“It was really fun for us,” Embiid said. “Don’t think it was fun for them.”

Embiid was questionable before the game with lower back soreness and coach Brett Brown hinted during pregame it might be best for the Philadelphia big man to sit this one out. Embiid clearly had other intentions.

“I want to fight with my teammates,” he said. “Whatever I have to do, I’ll do for my team.”

His 24 first-half points helped Philadelphia to a 65-50 halftime lead, and he punctuated an entertaining opening 24 minutes by pinning Harden’s layup attempt with 7.5 seconds left for a crowd-pleasing block. The duo had to be separated with 38.7 seconds left in the half, with each being issued a technical, after Harden took exception to Embiid’s foul on him.

The 76ers broke the game open in a dominant third quarter as they outscored Houston 29-13 to take a 94-63 advantage into the fourth. Ben Simmons stole Harden’s pass, made a layup and finished a three-point play after being fouled by Harden to make it 73-52. The lead kept growing, getting as large as 31.

“We were due for a game like this,” Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni said.

Harden had 10 points in the third but missed four of six field goal tries as the 76ers hounded him defensively with double-teams and different looks. A tired-looking Harden’s air ball with 12.3 seconds left in the third showed the effects of the Philadelphia defense – and, perhaps, Harden’s offensive workload.

With the game out of range, Harden sat in the fourth.

“This is not a great way to rest him, but we rested him today,” D’Antoni said.