Celtics talking trade with Cavaliers for No. 1 pick

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If the Cavaliers were publicizing their indecision for the No. 1 pick to draw trade offers – and I think they were – it’s working.

The Magic reportedly made a strong offer of No. 4, No. 12 and Arron Afflalo.

The Celtics want to trade up, too.

A. Sherrod Blakely CSN Northeast:

A league source has told CSNNE.com that the Celtics have engaged the Cleveland Cavaliers about acquiring the No. 1 overall pick in Thursday’s NBA draft.

multiple sources indicate Boston would lean more towards Wiggins than Parker.

The Celtics have the Nos. 6 and 17 picks, which obviously hold less value than No. 4 and 12. Aside from Rajon Rondo, Boston has no player with as much value as Afflalo.

So, unless they’re wiling to trade Rondo for No. 1, the Celtics probably can’t trump Orlando’s offer. Maybe adding multiple future first rounders would help – Boston has plenty from the Nets and Clippers – but I still doubt it’s enough.

There’s no harm trying, but Danny Ainge is probably better off hoping Joel Embiid falls to No. 6.

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Report: Kings, Pistons talked Josh Smith trade, but it’s dead now

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UPDATE 5:45 pm: The dream of Rudy Gay and Josh Smith competing for who could take the more ill-advised three pointer is dead.

While some talks did take place they have fallen apart, reports Jonathan Givony of DraftExpress.com. That’s the right move by the Kings, but it makes me a little sad.

3:48 pm: Maybe no contract is untradable, but Josh Smith’s deal should be standing right next untradable with his arm around it. Smith is owed three more years, $40.5 million fully guaranteed. Thanks again for that, Joe Dumars.

Stan Van Gundy wants to give Andre Drummond and Greg Monroe a chance side by side, and that would mean finding a new home for Smith and his contract.

Like maybe Sacramento, reports Marc Stein of ESPN.

That’s some odd thinking out of Sacramento: “I want to recruit Rajon Rondo so let’s get a guy who will take touches away from DeMarcus Cousins and take more awkward threes than Rudy Gay. And he costs a lot over the long term, all the better!”

Smith can put up points, that’s not the question, he averaged 16.7 points a game last season, it’s that he took 16 shots a game to get there. It’s his shot selection that drives coaches crazy — look at his shot chart from last season. Notice 30.2 percent of his shots came from where he is a good shooter and nearly 70 percent from where he is not.

source:

That said, a lineup of Rondo, Ben McLemore, Gay, Smith and Cousins would be wildly entertaining. Potentially in a train wreck kind of way, but entertaining.

I think this trade idea is a long shot at best, but it was too good to ignore.

If you’re looking for a more sure thing Kings trade, both Stein and other league sources say Kings are shopping the No. 8 pick around.

2014 NBA Draft Preview: Boston Celtics

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Picks: 6, 17

Needs: To choose a direction. Rajon Rondo becomes an unrestricted free agent in 2015, and to retain him, the Celtics probably need to improve next season. If they draft an unrefined (or injured) prospect – which could be the prudent move – it might contribute to Rondo leaving. That has to be considered, and Thursday is time for Boston to chart its course, one way or another

Trade possibilities: The Celtics are in the Kevin Love race, and no matter how the Timberwolves posture, that could still get resolved on draft night. Even if it doesn’t, Danny Ainge is a wheeler-and-dealer. Boston has held such a high draft pick just once in the last 18 years – and it was traded for a veteran Ray Allen. That – along with adding Kevin Garnett – led to a championship the next season. It’s human nature for Ainge to try to repeat his own success.

Predictions: If Joel Embiid is on the board at No. 6, I can’t see him sliding past the Celtics. But I think Embiid will be gone and Aaron Gordon will become the pick. There will be good prospects available at No. 17. How about Zach Lavine? Gordon and Lavine would give Boston an incredible amount of upside, though early rough patches might send Rondo out the door. Then again, Lavine and Rondo share an agent, so maybe drafting one of Billy Duffy’s clients could help hold everything together.

Rajon Rondo says Carmelo Anthony might be ‘missing piece’ for Bulls; Celtics also in the mix

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Carmelo Anthony is expected to opt out and pursue free agency this summer, and he’s the one player who’s believed to be the most available for another team to scoop up.

LeBron James may do the same, of course, but his leaving Miami remains a long shot. And Kevin Love can be had for the right offer in trade, but he won’t be a free agent until the 2015 season has finished.

That leaves Anthony as the marquee free agent, especially if opting out does in fact mean that he’s made a decision to play somewhere else.

Chicago would seem to be the frontrunner for his services, and Rajon Rondo believes that the addition of Anthony would immediately propel the Bulls into the championship conversation.

“I hate to say it, but he just might be [the missing piece],’’ Rondo said on ESPN’s Numbers Never Lie, via Basketball Insiders. “[The Bulls] have a great center in Joakim Noah who holds down the paint and one of the best pick-and-roll defenders in our league. And with Derrick Rose coming back, you have a Big Three in Chicago. Melo could be the missing piece, but if he does a move like that, we’ll have to figure out something in Boston.’’

Later in the interview, Rondo discussed his own team’s pursuit of free agents, and Anthony’s name was one he included in the discussion.

“You never know what Danny [Ainge] is capable of doing,” Rondo said. “I can’t tell you too much. We want to be contenders as well next year. We don’t plan on being down for too long. I think Danny has a lot of wiggle room with what he’s been able to do the past couple of years in the draft. So I’m looking forward to what’s going to happen. Hopefully [Carmelo Anthony] doesn’t go to Chicago.”

“I think after we try to get ‘Melo and add an additional piece, then who knows? The sky’s the limit,” Rondo added. “I play to try to win a championship every year. With ‘Melo, I think it’s very possible.”

The Celtics have plenty of draft picks to entice teams to make a deal, and also have assets like young, inexpensive talent and expiring contracts that could be of interest, depending on their trade partner’s priorities.

Anthony signing in Boston doesn’t seem likely, however, given how far away the Celtics are from competing for a title; he isn’t going to leave in the neighborhood of $30 million on the table in New York just for the sake of changing scenery. It has to be a situation where the team he goes to is immediately capable of contending for the championship — someplace like Chicago, for example.

The Knicks can still trade Carmelo Anthony – if he lets them. Maybe he should.

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Carmelo Anthony is not long for the New York Knicks, it seems.

The Bulls, Rockets, Mavericks and Heat are circling. Phil Jackson and Derek Fisher couldn’t persuade him to play out the final year of his contract, and though their meeting with Melo went well, I bet Melo’s meeting with other suitors will also go well.

The writing is on the wall.

At minimum, Melo wants to become a free agent, and at that point, he could leave New York in the dust. But to do that, he’d have to leave more than $33 million on the table.

Maybe the Knicks and Melo could help each other avoid those undesirable outcomes by working together to trade the star.

Players can’t be traded after a season when they’ll become free agents or might become free agents due to an option that offseason. So, Melo is currently untradable because he holds an early termination option (the functional equivalent of a player option). But he can become tradable by amending his contract to remove the option, guaranteeing his deal extends through next season.

That essentially gives him power to approve any trade.

Like where the Knicks would send him? Waive the option.

Don’t like where the Knicks would send him? Refuse to waive the option.

A trade could allow Melo to make more money and the Knicks to guarantee themselves compensation, maybe even netting them a 2014 draft pick. If they want to pursue this route, the clock is ticking. Melo must decide on his option by Monday.

What’s in it for Melo?

As soon as Melo terminates his contract, he’s committing to a salary reduction for next season. His max starting salary as a free agent is $875,003 less than his option-year salary.

That’s a relative small amount to relinquish in order to secure a long-term contract – a max of more than $129 million re-signing with the Knicks or $95 million elsewhere.

But the $875,003 matters, because if Melo were to opt in, the value of a max deal he signs next summer would be determined by his salary this season. Comparing deals signed after playing out the option year to max deals signed this summer, he’d make $11.7 million more if he re-signs or $8.7 million more if he leaves – and don’t forget about the $ 23,333,405 he’d make this season.

Of course, there’s no guarantee Melo would command a max contract next offseason.

Melo is coming off the two best seasons of his career. He’ll definitely draw max offers now.

But he’s also 30, and most players begin to decline around this age.

If Melo wants to simply terminate his contract and secure a long-term deal while he knows he can get one, I definitely wouldn’t blame him. That’s the safe route and the one he seems set to travel.

However, if he wants to leave New York, agreeing to a trade would net him an extra $68 million – as long as he still gets a max contract in 2015. It’s a risk, but the reward exists.

The best money is in re-signing with your current team, and it’s not too late for Melo to change his current team.

It might be too late for him to get the “Dwight Howard treatment,” but Melo can still cause a stir this weekend.

Melo has never been a free agent. He signed an extension with the Nuggets and another extension when traded to the Knicks.

I think Melo wants teams woo him, to line up at his door and one-by-one make their pitches. No doubt, it would be a fun experience.

The Knicks have already started the process, and they can grant teams permission to negotiate with Melo as part of a trade. Remember, trade partners must sell Melo, because he’s untradable without his consent.

And why would he give consent to a trade rather than just signing with that new team in a month?

Here’s the most Melo could earn by terminating his contract (orange) or agreeing to a trade and then signing a new contract in 2015 (blue). Both scenarios show re-signing with his current team and leaving his current team.

Path 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 Total
Waive ETO for trade, re-sign $23,333,405 $24,500,075 $26,337,581 $28,175,087 $30,012,592 $31,850,098 $164,208,838
Waive ETO for trade, leave $23,333,405 $24,500,075 $25,602,579 $26,705,082 $27,807,585   $127,948,726
Exercise ETO, re-sign $22,458,402 $24,142,782 $25,827,162 $27,511,542 $29,195,922   $129,135,810
Exercise ETO, leave $22,458,402 $23,469,030 $24,479,658 $25,490,286     $95,897,375

The most Melo could make by leaving the Knicks now is $95,897,375

But if he gets traded to a new team and re-sign there in 2015, a new max contract would be worth $140,875,433 over five years – bringing his six-year total, including this year’s option salary, to $164,208,838.

And if Melo chooses poorly on where he’s traded now and wants to leave his next team in 2015, he could still get four years and $104,615,321 on a max contract – a total of $127,948,726 with this year’s option salary.

Again, deferring a new contract for a year carries major risk. That’s offset by a small bump in guaranteed salary next season and the potential for an even larger payday as a free agent next year than he could get this year. But it is a gamble.

What’s in it for the Knicks? 

If the Knicks lose Melo, they’d like something in return.

They’ll obviously have to weigh the odds he walks as a free agent, the possibility of a sign-and-trade and and what they’re offered in a trade before June 23. But that equation is increasingly pointing to trying to trade him now.

The first step would be granting other teams permission to pitch Melo. After all, he must consent to a deal by waiving his early-termination option.

Simultaneously, New York would negotiate with potential trader partners. Unlike a sign-and-trade, which couldn’t happen until July, this type of trade could land the Knicks a first-round pick in next week’s draft. If they’re rebuilding without Melo, it would be extremely helpful to begin that process now rather than wasting a year.

Finding a workable trade will be difficult, because the team trading for Melo gets him for only one year guaranteed. That will limit New York’s return, but something is better than nothing.

Making matters more difficult is the current trade climate. 

It’s still technically the 2013-14 season through June 30, so 2013-14 salaries are used in trades. Though several teams can easily create cap space when the clock turns over to 2014-15 in July, few have space now.

Plus, because teams can’t trade players who will become free agents this summer or might become free agents due to an option, a ton of players are off the table. The Heat, with only Norris Cole and Justin Hamilton available to deal, would be completely out of the picture in these discussions.

And nearly everyone with a player option has veto power. The standard deadline for a player option or early-termination option is June 30, so as Melo must agree to a deal, so must nearly any player who holds one of those options.

Want to go to New York? Remove the option now. Don’t want to go to New York? Wait to opt in until after Melo’s early deadline.

Because of these restrictions, trades can be very difficult to cobble together. Here are a few examples of what could work:

  • Bulls: Melo for Carlos Boozer, Ronnie Brewer, Lou Amundson, No. 16 and No. 19 picks in 2014 draft
  • Rockets: Melo for Jeremy Lin, Omer Asik, No. 25 pick in 2014 draft, 2016 first-round pick
  • Mavericks: Melo and Raymond Felton for Jose Calderon, Brandan Wright, Samuel Dalembert, Wayne Ellington, Shane Larkin, Jae Crowder, 2016 first-round pick, 2018 first-round pick
  • Warriors: Melo for David Lee, Harrison Barnes, Draymond Green
  • Celtics: Melo for Jeff Green, Keith Bogans, Joel Anthony, No. 6 pick in 2014 draft

What’s in it for the trade partner?

Well, you get Melo, one of the NBA’s best scorers.

That’s not without risk, though.

If those above offers seem low, it’s because a team acquiring Melo this way would get him for only one year before he becomes a free agent. That should be a concern, but not as large as it might initially appear.

By agreeing to a trade, Melo would be signaling his interest in re-signing with his new team. Plus, his new team can offer him more money in 2015 free agency than anyone else. It would be relationship set up to succeed.

No team should trade for Melo unless it plans to re-sign him next summer, but if everything goes south quickly, his new team could always flip him before the trade deadline and cut its losses.

Will it happen?

Probably not.

There are a lot moving parts. The Knicks, another team and Melo must all satisfy each other to reach a deal – and there isn’t much time left.

But in all the Melo options being discussed, a trade is overlooked. It’s worth examining.

If, after this process, Melo wanted to stay with the Knicks, he could either terminate his contract and re-sign for $129 million or opt in and then re-sign for up to $164 million. He’s previously ruled out the second option, but that was probably at least partially based on the desire to explore his options. With his options explored in this scenario, maybe he takes his chances on staying in Ne York and earning a larger payday next year.

There’s really no risk in Melo and the Knicks pursuing a trade now. If they don’t find a suitable deal, Melo can opt out Monday as originally planned and hit the ground running in free agency come July 1.

But for the potential of an extra $68 million to Melo and a 2014 draft pick for New York, it’s probably worth the effort to try to find a deal.