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Joe Lacob: I felt ‘really personally persecuted’ by other NBA owners after signing Kevin Durant

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Warriors owner Joe Lacob said he felt other NBA owners were mad at him after signing Kevin Durant.

Now, Lacob has raised the rhetoric.

Lacob, via Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

“That [NBA] owners meeting, the July after we got Kevin, was a difficult one,” Lacob said. “I felt really personally persecuted by the other owners.”

Here, via Getty Images, is Lacob celebrating Golden State’s second straight title:

Thoughts and prayers go out to him.

NBA offseason starting earlier than it has in three decades

AP Photo/Carlos Osorio
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The Warriors barely had a moment to celebrate their championship before LeBron James became center off attention.

The NBA offseason is upon us. On June 9.

That’s the earliest offseason start since 1986, when it also began June 9. The last time it started earlier was 1983, when it began June 1.

A history offseason starts:

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Why so early this year?

For the last several years, the NBA Finals have begun the Thursday between May 31 and June 6. (We’ll see next year whether the league uses May 30 or June 7.) This happened to be a year Thursday fell earlier in the range, May 31.

Then, of course, Golden State swept Cleveland to end the Finals as quickly as possible.

Now, we turn to LeBron, Paul George, DeAndre Ayton, Luka Doncic and everyone else with intriguing, unknown futures.

David West: Public has ‘no clue’ about Warriors’ behind-the-scenes issues

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The Warriors just won their second straight championship and third in four years. They have staked a credible claim as the greatest team of all-time. Their stars – Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green – are young enough to keep the title window open years ahead.

So, all is right with Golden State?

Maybe not, David West and Shaun Livingston indicate.

Marc J. Spears of The Undefeated:

Marcus Thompson of The Athletic:

West is essentially bragging – and inviting reporters to dig deeper now. Perhaps, whatever he’s alluding to will come out.

Durant, Green and even Curry have more complex personalities than often acknowledged. I can see how there’d be conflict.

But the Warriors have a strong culture and a lot of talent, the latter important because winning cures nearly all ills. Problems that would sink other teams are less likely to undermine the Warriors.

Mainly, I just want to know the details of what West is talking about.

Swept, sad and still starving for another title, what’s next for LeBron James?

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CLEVELAND – LeBron James sat in his locker, covered by more ice than clothing and his right hand – which he injured while punching a whiteboard following the Cavaliers’ devastating Game 1 loss – wrapped. He hunched his towel-covered head into his left hand. He leaned back and slumped in his seat, the towel still hiding his face, and sat that way for several minutes.

LeBron looked beat.

By the Warriors, by the burden he carried leading an underwhelming supporting cast to the NBA Finals, by the weight of his second Cleveland tenure possibly ending.

Will he use his player option to leave the Cavs this summer?

“I have no idea at this point,” LeBron said after Golden State swept Cleveland in the NBA Finals. “The one thing that I’ve always done is considered, obviously, my family. Understanding especially where my boys are at this point in their age. They were a lot younger the last time I made a decision like this four years ago. I’ve got a teenage boy, a pre-teen and a little girl that wasn’t around as well. So sitting down and considering everything, my family is a huge part of whatever I’ll decide to do in my career, and it will continue to be that. So, I don’t have an answer for you right now as far as that.”

A few days ago, LeBron spoke candidly about why he left the Cavaliers in 2010 – because the team wasn’t good enough. Tonight, he addressed why he returned in 2014.

“I came back because I felt like I had some unfinished business,” LeBron said.

Did leading Cleveland to its first championship in 2016 finish that business?

“That’s a trick question at the end of the day,” LeBron said, “and I’m not falling for that.

“It made me even more hungry to continue to try to win championships, and I still want to be in championship mode. I think I’ve shown this year why I will still continue to be in championship mode.”

The Cavaliers showed how they are not. They traded Kyrie Irving against LeBron’s wishes and whittled down their return for the star point guard to spare parts and the No. 8 pick – a valuable asset, but one that didn’t help the 2018 Cavs compete in these playoffs.

At times, LeBron’s weak supporting cast appeared to drive him mad. He vented at his teammates during a Game 4 timeout, and he melted down on the bench before Game 1’s overtime as he learned details of J.R. Smith‘s blunder. And, as we discovered, LeBron carried his frustration into the post-Game 1 locker room and tried to channel it through a whiteboard.

Gesturing while answering a question tonight, LeBron raised his right hand above the table and revealed a cast. The sound of cameras flickering overpowered the room.

“You guys like this brace, huh?” LeBron said, cracking a smile. “You guys like this cast, huh? You want me to sit it right here for you?

“Pretty much played the last three games with a broken hand.”

It hurts now, but LeBron has been through too much – 15 seasons, eight straight NBA Finals appearances and now six Finals losses (behind only Jerry West’s eight and Elgin Baylor’s seven all-time) – to totally sulk through this latest challenge.

LeBron knows precisely what that challenge is. It was down the hall covering itself in champagne while LeBron sat silently at his locker and contemplated.

Finally, LeBron emerged from the locker room and turned right down the hall. Unaware LeBron was headed toward the interview room rather than leaving, a security guard called from behind that LeBron and his group should go another way to avoid crowds. LeBron stopped to sort out the confusion. Turns out, he was going the best way to the interview room, and he kept going.

After his press conference, LeBron walked out of the interview room and made a pointed turn toward Bill Russell. LeBron leaned down to embrace the legend in his wheelchair.

Then, LeBron headed straight for the exit.

Golden State of Domination: Warriors win second straight title, sweep Cavaliers in NBA Finals

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CLEVELAND – The brightest dreams of the Bay Area and the darkest nightmares of everywhere else – especially here – have come to fruition.

The Warriors, already great then supercharged by Kevin Durant, blazed through the field to win their second straight championship and third in four years.

The 2018 title came with a sweep of the Cavaliers, capped by a 108-85 win in Game 4 Friday. It was the first sweep in the NBA Finals since 2007, when the Cavs lost to the Spurs.

Back then, LeBron James was about to start a three-year contract extension he signed the prior year. This summer, LeBron James holds a player option he could use to leave Cleveland – and many expect him to.

A couple days ago, LeBron reflected on leaving the Cavaliers in 2010 because they weren’t good enough. These historically great Warriors and Cleveland’s inept supporting cast have left LeBron looking spent. Can the Cavs get good enough quickly enough to convince LeBron to stay?

They aren’t close.

After Golden State won a competitive six-game Finals in 2015 and the Cavaliers made a historic comeback in a seven-game Finals in 2016, the third and fourth matchups between these teams have been barely competitive. Since signing Durant, the Warriors have dominated – especially on the biggest stage.

The combination of Golden State’s record (8-1) and point difference (+94) is unmatched over consecutive Finals.

Only the 2001-2002 Lakers and 1989-90 Pistons equal the record:

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And only a couple versions of the old-school Celtics top the point difference:

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Stephen Curry, Draymond Green and Klay Thompson now each have three rings – a significant line in their resumés when it comes to all-time rankings. Curry, with his two MVPs, could land quite high on those lists already. He put his Game 3 dud behind him and enters the discussion coming off a 37-point Game .

Curry (30), Durant (29), Thompson (28) and Green (28) are still young enough to keep the window open for several more years.

The Warriors have now reached four straight Finals and won three of them – a feat matched by only Magic Johnson’s Lakers (1985-88 with the Celtics winning in 1986) and Bill Russell’s Celtics (1957-66 with the St. Louis Hawks winning in 1958).

Where does this end?

Four in five? Five in six? Six in seven?

For these Warriors, it’s easy to let imagination run wild.

For the Cavs, this could be the end of the road. If so, it was a memorable four years with LeBron back. Cleveland will always have 2016 and the unprecedented comeback from down 3-1 in the Finals.

But Golden State has the present and an inside track on owning the future.

What will LeBron do about it? His free-agency decision will shape the rest of a league that has tried in vain to keep up with these Warriors or just surrendered to them.

Upending Golden State’s dynasty won’t be easy. LeBron knows that as well as anyone.

Nobody has found the answer yet. Any hope to starts with him.