Udonis Haslem

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Heat walk through haunted house together (VIDEO)

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Thursday is Halloween, and perhaps the night in the NBA that signifies that the regular season is here to stay for a very long time. Players get into the spirit of things, often wearing costumes to the arena before games and debuting custom painted sneakers.

This year for Halloween, the Miami Heat decided to take a group trip to a haunted house in their own arena. The organization filmed the experience, and the results were predictably hilarious.

Via Twitter:

The work that goes into making a haunted house is very impressive. Good ones are scary, complex, and keep you on the edge of your seat without being overbearing. The best part of videos like this is watching NBA players do the same thing a lot of us do when we’re scared — talk out loud to try to act like the situation doesn’t have the better of us.

Glad nobody got spooked too bad. Except Udonis Haslem. Dude was sweating his fears out.

Heat re-sign Udonis Haslem

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Players to spend their entire careers with the same team, by most seasons:

  • Dirk Nowitzki (21 with Mavericks)
  • Kobe Bryant (20 with Lakers)
  • Tim Duncan (19 with Spurs)
  • John Stockton (19 with Jazz)
  • Reggie Miller (18 with Pacers)
  • Udonis Haslem (16 with Heat)
  • Manu Ginobili (16 with Spurs)
  • John Havlicek (16 with Celtics)
  • David Robinson (14 with Spurs)
  • Joe Dumars (14 with Pistons)
  • Jerry West (14 with Lakers)

That’s 10 Hall of Famers/future Hall of Famers.

And Udonis Haslem.

Haslem isn’t the typical star who sticks with a team for that long. But Haslem – a Miami native who initially signed as an undrafted free agent – has endeared himself to the Heat with toughness and grittiness. He has won three championships in Miami, playing the enduring sidekick to Dwyane Wade. Haslem has proven his value to the Heat’s culture.

That’s why they’ll bring him back for a 17th season.

Heat release:

The Miami HEAT announced today that they have re-signed forward Udonis Haslem.

Haslem said during the season he’d retire with Wade then had a change of heart.

The 39-year-old Haslem has barely played the last few seasons. But he’ll provide veteran mentorship and a steady example.

He’ll get a $2,564,753 salary and continue a job he clearly enjoys. Why rush retirement when that’s available?

The Heat could have used that roster spot on a young player with more upside. But this is a return everyone in Miami will feel good about.

Report: Kevin Durant, Kyrie Irving taking discounts so Nets can give DeAndre Jordan four years, $40M

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Kevin Durant, Kyrie Irving and DeAndre Jordan will sign with the Nets.

But Durant and Irving won’t get max contracts – just so Jordan can get a lucrative deal.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Brooklyn added two stars. That’s what matters most.

But this is a ridiculous overpay for Jordan. He turns 31 next month and has already shown signs of decline. Maybe he’ll play more energetically with his new star teammates. But mere motivation isn’t enough to create assurances someone his age will live up to this contract.

Durant and Jordan are friends, and that’s what seemed to drive this arrangement. It reminds me of LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh taking discounts their first season with the Heat so Miami could sign Udonis Haslem and Mike Miller.

That Durant and Irving are footing the short-term cost of Jordan’s contract is a boon to the Nets. There are ways to structure Durant’s and Irving’s contracts with incentives to get them close to their max salaries. But they are not getting guaranteed maxes.

Brooklyn will have to deal with Jordan’s contract over the long run. It will likely make it more difficult to build a supporting cast around Durant and Irving.

But that’s a perfectly acceptable burden considering the upside of getting Durant and Irving.

Mike Conley, Khris Middleton, Steven Adams among 12 nominees for NBA’s Teammate of the Year

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Chauncey Billups, Shane Battier, Tim Duncan, Vince Carter, Dirk Nowitzki and Jamal Crawford have won the Twyman–Stokes Teammate of the Year Award.

Who’ll claim it next?

NBA:

Each of these players is a good teammate in his own way.

Steven Adams does all the dirty work to make the Thunder – especially Russell Westbrook – operate smoothly.

Mike Conley has remained steady amid a losing season full of trade rumors.

Jared Dudley is smart, always willing to share his opinion and happy to help younger teammates.

Channing Frye fosters better communication and relationships within the locker room.

Rudy Gay showed great determination recovering from a torn Achilles.

Udonis Haslem oozes veteran wisdom.

Andre Iguodala is highly intelligent, on and off the court, and tries to use his knowledge to help his teammates.

Kyle Korver continued to do his job after what could have been an ugly end with the Cavaliers, and he remains steadfast with the Jazz.

Khris Middleton set a tone for the four Bucks starters who entered this season on expiring contracts to remain focused and unselfish.

J.J. Redick is the 76ers’ veteran voice.

Garrett Temple is a bit of a surprising inclusion considering he got into a fight with Grizzlies teammate Omri Casspi earlier this season. But Temple, who was since traded to the Clippers, is renowned for his professionalism.

Thaddeus Young keeps becoming an even more complete player for his team. With Victor Oladipo sidelined, more of a leadership role has fallen on Young.

Grade-school phenom Allonzo Trier took winding road to success with Knicks

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Allonzo Trier appeared on the cover of The New York Times Magazine as a sixth grader. By then, the Seattle native was already spending his weekends jetting around the country for basketball games. In high school, he moved to Oklahoma then Maryland then Nevada to join teams.

“It’s become normal for the top high school, premier athletes,” Trier said.

Should it be normal?

“We’re not normal people,” Trier said. “You know what I mean? Who’s to say for the normal tech person, the normal other people that are at the top of what they do in their lives and their careers? So, I don’t really think there’s a limit you can put on somebody.”

The top-rated player nationally in his class in elementary school, Trier’s potential seemed limitless, and he worked tirelessly to fulfill it. But spending an up-and-down three years at University of Arizona and going undrafted left doubt about his NBA career as of just a few months ago.

Yet, Trier – who signed with the Knicks – is already proving he belongs.

He’s averaging 11.3 points per game. That’s one of the highest scoring averages ever for an undrafted rookie in his first professional season (minimum: 10 games):

image

*Don Barksdale finished at UCLA in 1947, but he spent a couple years playing AAU in Oakland while waiting for the NBA to integrate.

Trier just gets buckets. The 6-foot-5 guard is a methodical dribbler, capable of pulling up or slashing. His crafty moves draw plenty of fouls, especially for a rookie, and he’s a solid shooter.

Trier has a good chance to become just the 13th undrafted player to make an All-Rookie team, joining Yogi Ferrell, Langston Galloway, Gary Neal, Jamario Moon, Walter Herrmann, Jorge Garbajosa, Marquis Daniels, Udonis Haslem, J.R. Bremer, Chucky Atkins, Matt Maloney and Larry Stewart. Only Ferrell, Galloway, Daniels, Bremer, Stewart did it in their first professional season.

In some respects, the biggest surprise is how long it took Trier to reach this point. 247 ranked him No. 6 in his high school class, and everyone ahead of him – Ben Simmons (76ers), Skal Labissiere (Kings), Brandon Ingram (Lakers), Cheick Diallo (Pelicans) and Jaylen Brown (Celtics) – went one-and-done in college.

“We thought I was going to be out in one year,” Trier said.

But Trier broke his hand during his freshman year, wasn’t quite as sharp upon his return and stayed for his sophomore season. That came with expectations from Arizona coach Sean Miller.

“Coach Miller told me that was going to be my last year,” Trier said.

Then, Trier got into a car crash before the season. He failed a drug test, but won his appeal, the NCAA agreeing he unknowingly took Ostarine while recovering from the crash. Still, the NCAA ruled he couldn’t play until the drug completely left his body. “It was really dumb,” Trier said. “It was really tedious.” He missed most the season and again forewent the draft.

In his junior year, Trier got suspended yet again for trace amounts of Ostarine. “A joke,” Trier said. “C’mon now. You guys know what the deal was.” He appealed, and this time, the NCAA allowed him to return to the court within a week.

Trier finally turned pro this year, but he went undrafted.

That “undrafted” label is harsher than it sounds. The Knicks called him during the draft and offered to sign him if he went undrafted. Trier said “a few” teams would have drafted him contingent on him accepting a certain contract, but he turned them down in order to get to New York.

Still, more teams could have called. Someone could have liked him enough to draft him despite his unwillingness to pledge to contract terms beforehand.

“I’m angry. I was upset,” Trier said. “I thought it was like a joke that I didn’t get picked.”

He signed a two-way contract with the Knicks – importantly, for only one season. He earns $4,737 every day he’s on New York’s active list for a game or works out/practices with a teammate at the team’s discretion. On other days, he gets paid $544.

Between the start of G League training camp and the end of the G League season, Trier can spend 45 days with the NBA club. Today marks 45 days since G League training camps opened. Surely, the Knicks have had enough travel days and days off to extend Trier’s deadline at least another week. But it’s looming.

By then, the Knicks have three options:

  • Convert Trier’s contract to a standard contract. He’d get paid $4,737 daily the rest of the season and be eligible to play all New York’s remaining games. But next summer, he’d become a restricted free agent with a qualifying offer $200,000 above the league minimum – meaning his qualifying offer would project to be about $1.6 million.
  • Leave Trier on a two-way contract. He couldn’t play for New York until the G League season ends, but his qualifying offer next summer would be cheaper – a two-way contract with just $50,000 guaranteed.
  • Negotiate a new, longer contract with Trier. The Knicks have enough of their mid-level exception left to offer Trier a minimum salary on a contract that could last up to four years. New York also has the bi-annual exception, which could give Trier a starting salary up to $3,382,000 – but on a deal lasting only two years.

Whether he hits restricted free agency with a minimum+$200k or a two-way qualifying offer, Trier appears likely to command standard-contract offer sheets. So, the second option is likely off the table unless the Knicks are trying to scare Trier into accepting a more team-friendly multi-year deal.

But how could New York not reward an undrafted player who has shown so much determination, even outplaying teammates No. 9 pick Kevin Knox and No. 36 pick Mitchell Robinson?

“He basically just came into training camp and said, ‘I’m going to make this team.’ And then, once he made the team, he said, ‘I’m going to get in the rotation,'” Knicks coach David Fizdale said. “That’s the kind of kid he is. He’s a super competitor.”

Two-way contracts give teams immense control, but Trier’s play has given him unusual leverage. He has scored more than triple the points of any other two-way player this season. His ability to become a free agent this summer presses the Knicks to pay him more now.

But Trier, who turns 23 next month, is older than everyone drafted this year besides George King, Devonte' Graham, Devon Hall, Jevon Carter and Grayson Allen. Maybe Trier should be better than his rookie peers.

Trier’s all-around game is also lacking at this point. And his scoring often comes in isolation after taking his time with his moves. So, when he gets stifled, the shot clock has run down considerably before the Knicks can try another plan of attack. Trier must main very efficient as a scorer to justify continuing to play this way. Even as a two-way rookie, Trier plays with a star’s style.

Probably because he has spent so long as a star.

The New York Times Magazine featured him as an example of the trappings and pressures of high-level grass-roots basketball. The most telling quote in the story came from his mother, Marcie: “They’re doing nice things for my son, things that he needs and I can’t afford. So how can I say no?”

Trier was such a big deal as a kid, it was arranged for him to meet Kevin Durant during a media event Durant’s rookie year in Seattle. Durant and Trier had a mutual friend in Oklahoma, and then Trier transferred to Durant’s former high school in Maryland (Montrose Christian). Through those connections, Durant and Trier developed a friendship.

“I think he just dove into basketball, and it was therapeutic for him,” Durant said. “You can tell.

“He’s one of those kids that really, really, really loves basketball. He’s not doing it for money. He’s not doing it for fame. He’s not doing it for attention. Or to get girls. Or to buy s—. He’s actually a hooper. It’s rare in this league to have guys like that.”

That’s clearly why Trier has persevered through the bright lights , dark days and everything in between. That New York Times Magazine article took Trier to a wider audience, and he just kept plugging away.

“I was young, so I don’t think I understood it fully,” Trier said. “But now that I – I’m still young, so I still don’t understand it. But, one day, I think I’ll get a chance to look back and see the journey I went through and see, man, started at a young age, and it was a hell of a journey.”