Tony Snell

David Sherman/NBAE via Getty Images

Report: Andrew Wiggins’ contract extension was central to Jimmy Butler’s unhappiness with Timberwolves

3 Comments

In 2017, Andrew Wiggins signed a five-year, max contract extension with the Timberwolves.

In 2018, Jimmy Butler requested a trade from the Timberwolves.

You can apparently draw a straight line between those two events.

Bobby Marks of ESPN:

Wiggins has failed to live up to expectations, and the extension was at the root of Jimmy Butler’s unhappiness in Minnesota, league sources confirmed.

Wiggins’ contract troubled Butler in a couple ways.

Butler called Wiggins the “most god-gifted player on our team.” The problem: Butler was way better than Wiggins. That clearly bothered Butler, who scraped his way to the top. It’s easy to see how he’d view Wiggins as having more just handed to him and resent Wiggins for it.

When Butler was up for a contract extension with the Bulls, they reportedly told him they’d bury him behind Tony Snell if he didn’t sign. Wiggins’ hurdle for getting a max contract extension? He had to look the owner in the eyes and promise to try really hard.

Wiggins’ has regressed since signing his extension, leaving Minnesota with limited flexibility around his massive contract. Butler felt the brunt of that, too.

Last summer, he reportedly requested a renegotiation-and-extension that would’ve added four years and $155 million to his deal. But the Timberwolves didn’t have the cap space to make that happen – in large part because of Wiggins’ deal.

Of course, Butler knew that. It was unrealistic for Minnesota to trade Wiggins without bringing back salary at that point. So, I wouldn’t be surprised if Butler’s renegotiation-and-extension request were designed to create an excuse for a trade request. He might have wanted out for reasons other than just his own contract status.

Like the Timberwolves being saddled for years to come by an underachieving Wiggins on a max contract.

Butler got away, finding a great fit and a max contract with the Heat. Minnesota is still dealing with the same problem.

Joe Johnson working to prove Big3 is path back to NBA roster

Chris Schwegler/NBAE via Getty Images
1 Comment

When Joe Johnson signed with the Detroit Pistons, the headline everywhere seemed a variation of “The Big3 Is A Path Back To The NBA.”

Except Joe Johnson is not on an NBA roster yet — the contract he signed with the Pistons was only partially guaranteed. Meaning they can cut him at any point without too much pain. Johnson and Christian Wood are the guys considered to be battling for the final roster spot (Wood is on a non-guaranteed contract as well, although reportedly with a smaller guarantee).

Johnson, however, understands he is carrying the hope of a lot of Big3 players on his shoulders, and he takes that seriously, as he told Eric Woodyard of ESPN.

“That was another reason why I thought it was very important for me to take this opportunity, because those guys in the Big3, a lot of them anyway, have hopes to at some point to be able to get back in the league,” Johnson said. “So I just wanted to let everyone know that it’s possible just to get to this point. I mean, I’m not even all the way on the roster, but to get to this point, get your foot in the door. Then whatever you do from that point, it’s up to you.”

Johnson reportedly has been in good shape and performed well early in camp, but we’re weeks away from decisions being made.

Whether he makes the roster or not may come down to what the Piston coaches and front office prioritize. Johnson can provide depth at the three behind Tony Snell, and maybe a little stretch four at points, plus is a pro in the locker room. Johnson is a “we want to win more games now” kind of choice. Wood, at 24, is 14 years younger, is more athletic, and at this point has more upside, but he is a project.

If Johnson can make the Pistons’ roster the Big3’s pitch to guys such as Jamal Crawford or Corey Brewer (or even Carmelo Anthony) is “we can be your path back to the NBA.” Just getting into training camp provides some of that.

Roster battles are rare in an NBA of guaranteed contracts, but Johnson’s fight for a roster spot is worth watching.

With this era’s flame still flickering, Pistons load bench with name recognition

Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE via Getty Images
Leave a comment

NBC Sports’ Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

Just three teams have had the same trio of $16 million-plus-salary players each of the previous two seasons and next season:

Golden State won a championship, returned to the NBA Finals and enters next season with four-ish stars in a two-star league.

Detroit missed the playoffs, got swept in the first round and enters next season with, um, a reasonable chance at making the Eastern Conference playoffs.

The Pistons’ expensive core has underwhelmed while limiting flexibility. Drummond and Jackson are paid too much to trade for value and too good to tank with. The best option is probably the least drastic, keeping this group together and hoping for the best.

Same story last summer. Same story this summer.

But maybe not same story next summer.

Jackson’s contract expires after next season. Drummond has a player option he sounds ready to decline. At that point, the Pistons must decide what to do with Griffin – keep his top supporting players, find new ones or trade him to kickstart a rebuild.

In the meantime, Detroit added yet another expensive potential starter and a few recognizable reserves. This far into the plan – no matter how lackluster the results so far – the present remains a high priority.

The Pistons turned Jon Leuer‘s deadweight contract and the No. 45 pick into Tony Snell, No. 37 pick Deividas Sirvydis, No. 57 pick Jordan Bone, the Trail Blazers’ 2023 second-rounder and $3 million. I would’ve rather kept Snell and the No. 30 pick sent by the Bucks for taking his undesirable contract (and Detroit’s original second-rounder, No. 45). But that wouldn’t have generated the $3 million cash.

Milwaukee dumped Snell because he’s too expensive for a fringe rotation player there and due $12,178,571 in 2020-21. Leuer’s contract was expiring. But the Pistons are so desperate on the wing, they might start Snell.

The Pistons also signed Derrick Rose (two years, $15 million), Markieff Morris (two years, $6.56 million) and Joe Johnson (partially guaranteed, surely minimum). That’s a former MVP, someone who finished fourth in Most Improved Player voting at age 24 and a seven-time All-Star.

But those likely backups are past their primes. Rose looked like he’d fall out of the NBA before a resurgent/outlier-shooting season last year. Though helpful more often recently, Morris didn’t crack the Thunder’s playoff rotation. Johnson has been playing in a 3-on-3 league for NBA retirees.

Expectations shouldn’t be too high. But there’s at least hope this group packs more punch than departed Ish Smith provided off the bench. More bench scoring could limit the load on Griffin, who – even in his best season in years – wore down by the playoffs.

Because of Rose’s injury history, it was important to sign Tim Frazier (minimum) as third point guard. Claiming Christian Wood off waivers was another a good under-the-radar move. But signing Joe Johnson will make it harder for Wood to make the regular-season roster.

If all goes well, Detroit’s best move of the offseason will be drafting Sekou Doumbouya No. 15. I rated him No. 7 on my board. But that was because I like his raw talent in a weak draft, not because I’m convinced he’ll become a good NBA player. It’ll take a while to assess that pick.

This summer wasn’t easy for the Pistons, but it was simple. Their status quo could change soon. If they play well next season, they’ll face difficult choices with Jackson and maybe Drummond. If they don’t play well next season, that’ll invite its own problems.

They’re hoping to face the play-well issues and built this team accordingly. But with limited flexibility, the outlook remains similar, with next summer looming as the major inflection point.

Offseason grade: C

With Bucks hoping to take off, leaving behind Malcolm Brogdon a risky choice

AP Photo/David Zalubowski
3 Comments

Next season is the Bucks’ time.

They shouldn’t wait.

They can’t wait.

Milwaukee is very good. Good enough to win a championship. There are no overwhelmingly dominant-looking teams this year. Most of the top contenders will beat up on each other out West. In the Eastern Conference, the 76ers must develop chemistry after a major roster makeover, and Kevin Durant‘s injury puts the Nets another year away from title contention. The Bucks got a necessary and hard-learned lesson in how to compete deep in the playoffs last season. They look primed now.

Giannis Antetokounmpo will also be eligible for a super-max contract extension next offseason. His willingness to re-up might depend on Milwaukee’s success this season. The Bucks remaining elite is totally predicated on keeping the 24-year-old MVP. His satisfaction with the team must be the priority.

With all that swirling, Milwaukee parted with restricted free agent Malcolm Brogdon.

A young talented guard the Bucks held matching rights on – gone. In return, they got absolutely nothing that will directly help them in the ultra-important upcoming season.

Maybe that was the right call. By signing-and-trading Brogdon to the Pacers, Milwaukee got a first-rounder and two second-rounders and avoided paying a red-flagged player $85 million over four years. There’s a case the Bucks got enough value and preserved enough flexibility to justify the move, even considering next season’s high stakes.

But this was also an essential decision for avoiding the luxury tax. That can’t be dismissed. If Milwaukee weakened its roster due to a refusal to pay the luxury tax this season of all seasons, that’d be incredibly disappointing.

This could be a choice that significantly shapes the Bucks for the next decade. I wish I had a better sense of their motivations.

At least Milwaukee got done the rest of its heavy lifting this summer and even rebounded nicely from the loss of Brogdon.

The Bucks re-signed Khris Middleton for less than the max (five years, $177.5 million). It was essential to keep Antetokounmpo’s lone supporting star.

Brook Lopez – with his 3-point shooting and interior defense – is even more important to Milwaukee’s identity. In a tricky situation due to holding only his Non-Bird Rights, the Bucks cleared enough cap space to re-sign him for four years, $52 million.

Milwaukee also had enough cap space to re-sign George Hill (three years, $28,771,806 with $20 million guaranteed). Hill played well in the playoffs. He’s also 33. It’s worth signing Hill to this deal. He can back up Eric Bledsoe, who struggled the last two postseasons, and help at shooting guard with Brogdon gone. But it’s far from certain Hill will live up to this contract.

The Bucks found surprising reinforcements at shooting guard with Wesley Matthews (1+1 minimum) and Kyle Korver (one-year minimum). Both are past their primes, but that’s tremendous value for those two. The big question: Would they have come to Milwaukee if Brogdon hadn’t left open so much playing time? That must be considered in the Brogdon evaluation, but again, it’s difficult to discern.

Robin Lopez signed for the room exception on 1+1. He’ll back up his twin brother. The Bucks could use Robin’s size at the position, especially with Joel Embiid and Philadelphia looking like the top threat in the East.

These are all good deals for Milwaukee. This offseason could have gone far worse for the Bucks given the steps they had to take to open cap space for Brook Lopez and Hill.

Milwaukee traded the overpaid but still helpful Tony Snell and No. 30 pick to the Pistons for Jon Leuer then waived Leuer, accepting a $3,169,348 over the next three years. That was a nasty set of transactions, but it was necessary. The Bucks also lost Nikola Mirotic, who returned to Europe.

After that, it was standard low-end roster moves. Adding Dragan Bender is intriguing. Adding Thanasis Antetokounmpo is the cost of doing business.

It just keeps coming back to Brogdon. How much will the Bucks miss him? How much did his departure improve their ability to lure Matthews and Korver? What will Milwaukee do with the draft picks acquired from Indiana?

That last one is a biggie. Trade those picks in the right deal, and the roster next could be even than it would have been with Brogdon – especially if ownership is willing to enter the luxury tax.

I just have a hard time figuring out where the Bucks stand on that, and it makes me uneasy about their summer.

Offseason grade: C

Report: Bucks, Brook Lopez ‘motivated’ to agree to new contract together

Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images
2 Comments

Brook Lopez said he prioritized a one-year contract in free agency last summer so he could prove himself.

Lopez sure proved himself this season.

The center shined for the breakthrough Bucks. He became an elite 3-point threat for a big, spacing the floor for Giannis Antetokounmpo. On the other end, Lopez paired nicely with Antetokounmpo as a staunch rim protector.

But because Lopez spent only one season in Milwaukee, the Bucks have just his Non-Bird Rights. That makes re-signing tricky.

At least Lopez and the Bucks appear intent on finding common ground.

Chris Mannix of Sports Illustrated:

Both sides are motivated to get a deal done, per source

The Bucks showed their motivation by trading Tony Snell and the No. 30 pick to the Pistons for Jon Leuer.

Milwaukee can now open about $14 million in cap space while keeping cap holds for Khris Middleton and Malcolm Brogdon. The Bucks could use that cap room to re-sign Lopez then exceed the cap to re-sign Middleton and Brogdon.

If a $14 million starting salary isn’t enough for Lopez, Milwaukee can clear more room by stretching Leuer and/or George Hill. The Bucks must decide on whether to stretch Hill’s $1 million guarantee by Thursday. They can decide on Leuer’s $9.76 million salary anytime by Aug. 31.

This plan could get expensive. Middleton could command a max contract. As a restricted free agent, Brogdon could land a huge offer sheet from a team trying to poach him. How much luxury tax will Milwaukee pay?

But soon-to-be-super-max-eligible Antetokounmpo is watching. Securing his supporting cast is important.