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Bucks avoid luxury-tax exposure as Pelicans reportedly claim Christian Wood off waivers

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The Bucks’ mission: Win enough to keep Giannis Antetokounmpo long-term.

This summer will present an inflection point. Three Milwaukee starters – Khris Middleton, Brook Lopez and Malcolm Brogdon – will be free agents, and the luxury tax looms. (The Bucks recently signed Eric Bledsoe to an extension, providing some cost-certainty.)

Will Milwaukee pay the luxury tax to keep this team intact? If so, how much tax and for how long? It’s a long way off, but the Bucks ought to start considering the possibility of the repeater tax down the road.

That’s why it was so risky for Milwaukee to waive Christian Wood and sign Tim Frazier. That put the Bucks in jeopardy of paying the luxury tax this season if they won the championship (triggering bonuses in Tony Snell‘s contract) and Wood went unclaimed. Obviously, Milwaukee would probably gladly pay the tax, miss out on payments to non-tax teams and start the repeater clock to win a title this year. But it’s still better to win without those downsides.

Thankfully for the Bucks, they’re off the hook.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

https://twitter.com/ShamsCharania/status/1108474930688155650

This is a nice pickup by the Pelicans. The 23-year-old Wood has looked good in limited NBA minutes and in the NBA’s minor league. His 2019-20 minimum salary is unguaranteed until that regular season begins. So, this is a low-risk addition with solid upside.

Maybe Milwaukee could use Wood in the frontcourt right now. Nikola Mirotic just suffered an injury that will sideline him a few weeks, and Giannis Antetokounmpo is out for tonight’s game against the Cavaliers with an ankle injury.

It’s unclear how quickly Wood will report to New Orleans, but he could step into the lineup if Anthony Davis misses more time.

Report: Bucks signing Tim Frazier, waiving Christian Wood

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Bucks guard Malcolm Brogdon is out through the start of the playoffs.

Now, Milwaukee is swapping a big for another guard.

Chris Haynes of Yahoo Sports:

Though a combo guard, Brogdon has primarily played shooting guard this season. Tim Frazier is a point guard. So, this isn’t a clear replacement.

Frazier, who spent training camp with Milwaukee, is a decent backup point guard. He’ll provide depth behind Eric Bledsoe and George Hill – depth missing without Brogdon. But Brogdon was merely insurance at point guard. His main role was off the ball.

Perhaps, with Frazier, the Bucks will use Hill more at shooting guard. More likely, they’ll continue to lean on Khris Middleton, Tony Snell, Donte DiVincenzo, Pat Connaughton and Sterling Brown at the position.

Christian Wood is more than a small loss. The 23-year-old has looked good in the minor league and limited NBA minutes. He possesses long-term intrigue.

Milwaukee is rightfully emphasizing the present. I’m just unconvinced Frazier moves the needle now.

Tomas Satoransky patches Wizards’ annual hole

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DETROIT – Tomas Satoransky operates at his own pace.

The Wizards drafted Satoransky No. 32 in 2012, when he was playing for Sevilla. He didn’t feel ready for the NBA, so he stayed in Spain. His contract with Sevilla expired in 2014. He still didn’t feel ready and signed with Barcelona. He even signed an extension with Barcelona in 2016.

Later that year, Satoransky thought it was time. Still under contract with Barcelona, his buyout (reportedly about $2 million) was larger than what Washington could pay without it counting against the cap ($650,000). But Satoransky was so certain of his decision, he paid the remainder of the buyout himself. He knew that’d be a possibility and ensured his extension left the option open.

Yet – for all the years he spent timing his jump to the NBA juuust right – he realized his perception of the league was still based on his childhood in the Czech Republic.

“I just saw the stars, the shining moments and everything,” Satoransky said. “Obviously, when you come over, you have to also go through some tough times as a player, especially coming over from Europe, getting used to everything and like that. But once you have a good role in the NBA, you just feel like you’re blessed.”

By that standard, Satoransky is blessed.

And the Wizards might be, too.

Washington has struggled for years whenever John Wall sits. Eric Maynor, Garett Temple, Andre Miller, Ramon Sessions, Trey Burke, Brandon Jennings and Tim Frazier have cycled through as backup point guards. None did the job well enough. Wall called the Wizards’ bench their downfall last postseason, citing it as a reason he ran out of gas.

Satoransky might finally be the answer.

Since Wall’s first playoff season (2014), Washington has played like a 46-win to 54-win team with him on the court. In that same span, the Wizards’ win pace ranged from 16 to 29 whenever he sat. Teams obviously perform worse without their biggest star, but that gap was hard.

Washington has remained strong with Wall this year (52-win pace) – and is far better than usual without him (37-win pace).

Here’s the Wizards win paces the last five years, with Wall (red) and without him (blue):

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This chart probably sells Satoransky short. Washington has also used Frazier and Sessions at point guard when Wall sits. But Satoransky has proven most effective. The Wizards play at a 47-win pace with him.

The idea Washington was better without Wall was always silly. But Satoransky’s strong play in his absence helped sparked the discussion – and earned him a larger role in the playoff rotation.

“He’s played well, and he deserves some extra minutes,” Wizards coach Scott Brooks said.

How is Satoransky flourishing? By continuing to put himself in comfortable positions.

That starts with his role.

“I don’t feel like I need to be a starter or anything,” Satoransky said. “That’s the thing the NBA has. You have to be a starter or a second-unit guy. It doesn’t bother me. And I don’t understand too much. For me, coming from Europe, it makes much more sense that you have 12 players and they all play based on how they play in the game. That’s what I get used to. I understand you cannot have it here, for some reason.”

And it continues on the court, where Satoransky plays so cerebrally.

He ranks sixth in the NBA in assist-to-turnover ratio. The leaderboard with per-game numbers:

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Satoransky’s 3-point percentage (47.4) would lead the league – if he shot enough 3s to qualify. He’s just so selective (which obviously contributes to his high efficiency).

Satoransky is also deadly on floaters, but he also passes up too many of them. Even Brooks – who says he mostly likes Satoransky’s methodical style – wants the point guard to take more floaters.

“People around me, they’re always like I should be more aggressive,” Satoransky said. “But it’s just the way I was taught to play the game, right way, in Europe.

“Mentally for me it’s tough, but for sure I think in the NBA, you have to be a little bit – in some moments – a little selfish.”

Satoransky could probably handle it. He doesn’t restrain his game purely out of necessity. At 6-foot-7 with above-the-rim athleticism he only shows in flashes, he could do more.

“I never force anything,” Satoransky said.

Except his way into the Wizards’ playoff rotation.

Washington (42-38) will enter the postseason as the No. 6, No. 7 or No 8 seed. The team has plenty of internal problems. Advancing is more unlikely than likely.

But, for once, backup point guard probably won’t be the primary reason for elimination.

Report: Wizards ‘seriously considering’ bringing in Ty Lawson

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Ty Lawson was one of the guys squeezed by the tight market last summer and the fact most teams like their point guards. Lawson had a solid season in Sacramento in the 2016-17 season — 9.9 points and 4.8 assists per game, a true shooting percentage of 55.1 (close to the league average), and a PER of 15.7. Yet there were no contract offers for the veteran this summer, so he played in China.

The Washington Wizards are without John Wall for another month or so due to knee surgery, and now backup point guard Tim Frazier is done for the season, so the Wizards are looking for help. There were rumors of the Wizards looking at Derrick Rose, but Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN reported a better idea.

After a season in the China Basketball Association, guard Ty Lawson has emerged as a serious candidate for a deal with the Washington Wizards, league sources told ESPN….

Nevertheless, Lawson’s strong performance with Shangdong of the CBA, including 55 points in his final game, has merited deeper inspection, league sources said. Lawson is expected to get the opportunity prior to the All-Star break to make a case to Washington about signing him, league sources said.

Other options include Rose, Briante Webber or Ramon Sessions, league sources said.

Of those choices, I’d take a flier on Lawson first — so long as his off-the-court challenges with alcohol are under control. The Wizards need to do something, Tomas Satoransky has played well but he needs some help.

Report: Wizards’ Tim Frazier will have surgery after taking knee to the face

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Tim Frazier has been a rotational player in Washington all season for the Wizards, but it looks like he could be out for a few days after taking a need to face on Saturday night against the Chicago Bulls.

Playing early in the second quarter, Frazier lost his footing while trying to threaten from a triple threat position. Frazier started to fall forward, and as defenders rushed to trap him during a Washington pick-and-roll, he went to a knee. That’s when his face (and nose) collided with Bobby Portis‘ knee, and Frazier had to leave the game.

It was an ugly collision, especially on replay, and many were hoping the damage was light for Frazier.

Early on Sunday, reports came in that Frazier would get surgery on his nose and could perhaps be back in the upcoming week.

Via Twitter:

Are we destined to get yet another NBA player in a mask this season? We’ve already had Kyrie Irving and Ron Baker. Perhaps Frazier is next.