Terrence Ross

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Do you believe in Magic? They sure do

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NBC Sports’ Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

The Magic just had their best season in seven years. Orlando was buzzing. Management poured more than $160 million into keeping the roster intact.

All for a 42-40 team that lost 4-1 in the first round.

The Magic should feel good about their breakthrough season. They ended the longest playoff drought in franchise history.

But this summer showed major long-term commitment to a group that has proven capable of just moderate winning and lacks obvious upside.

The major investments: Re-signing Nikola Vucevic (four years, $100 million) and Terrence Ross (four years, $54 million). Vucevic was an All-Star last season, and Vucevic finished fifth in Sixth Man of the Year voting. They’re good players.

But Vucevic didn’t become an All-Star until his eighth season. Most players who make their first All-Star game so late in their career don’t return. He also plays center, where there’s a surplus of capable players. That’s an expensive price for his age-29-through-31 seasons.

Likewise, Ross will turn 29 next season. He’s a streaky scorer who flourished in a bigger role last season. I’m just not convinced he’ll keep it up to justify his price tag.

At least Orlando structured the contracts well. Like Aaron Gordon‘s terms signed the year before, Vucevic’s salaries declines throughout his deal. Ross’ increases in the second year then declines. That should help the players hold more value later.

In the meantime, the Magic want to keep winning now. They’re the only Eastern Conference playoff team to return every starter.

They also re-signed key backups Khem Birch (two years, $6 million) and Michael Carter-Williams (minimum) for reasonable value. That continuity could make the difference next season. Orlando really took after Birch and Carter-Williams joined the rotation last season.

The Magic signed Al-Farouq Aminu (three years, $29,162,700) to add depth. In a vacuum, I like that move. In Orlando, Aminu is another power forward on a team overloaded with bigs.

It’s already difficult enough to find proper opportunities for Aaron Gordon and Jonathan Isaac. Aminu only complicates matters. All three can play both forward spots. Maybe the Magic envision always having two interchangeable forwards on the floor, allowing them to maintain a style. But all three are better at power forward. There were probably better ways to allocate resources.

Signing Aminu with the mid-level exception necessitated stretching Timofey Mozgov to stay out of the luxury tax. That’s a not-small $5,573,334 cap hit each of the next three seasons.

Orlando drafted yet another power in the first round, Chuma Okeke at No. 16. But considering Okeke tore his ACL in March, the Magic could look quite different by the time he’s ready to contribute. They might get a long runway with him, as he has yet to sign his rookie-scale contract and could spend next season on a minor-league deal. Six years of team control, up from the usual five for a first-round pick, could matter significantly.

There are paths for Orlando to reach the next level – Gordon becoming a star, Isaac breaking out, Mohamed Bamba getting on track after a disappointing rookie year, Okeke getting healthy and proving correct the advanced models that rated him as a top prospect, Markelle Fultz rediscovering his form. None seem like great bets, especially because it might take a couple hits to propel this forward.

There’s a decent chance this summer’s spending works out. Winning increases the value of everyone involved. It creates flexibility not afforded to losing teams. And it’s just fun while it’s happening.

But I think it’s slightly more likely Orlando regrets locking into these players at those prices – that the Magic don’t win enough then head right back to the wrong side of mediocre while facing new long-term costs.

Offseason grade: C-

Lakers move fast to bring back Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, JaVale McGee

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Kawhi Leonard taking his time to come to a decision — it was less than six days, remember LeBron’s “The Decision” was July 8, but free agency moved a lot faster this year — hurt the Lakers more than any other of the teams in the mix for Leonard.

The Lakers had two top-seven NBA stars in LeBron James and Anthony Davis, but now rather than add a third star the Lakers were scrambling early Saturday morning to round out their roster. A lot of the players they might have targeted — J.J. Redick, Trevor Ariza, Terrence Ross, even bringing back D'Angelo Russell, just to name a few — were off the table.

The Lakers moved fast to get Danny Green but paid a lot to get him at two-years, $30 million. Then they moved to bring back Kentavious Caldwell-Pope and JaVale McGee, reports Ramona Shelburne of ESPN.

Last season McGee started 62 games for the Lakers and averaged 12 points and 7.5 rebounds a game, with an efficient True Shooting percentage of 63.4. While Davis is far and away the best center on the Laker roster, he prefers to play as a four next to a more traditional five, which means McGee likely starts at center this season for the Lakers. (As a side note, this is where the Ivica Zubac trade last season hurts the Lakers even more.)

Caldwell-Pope averaged 11.4 points per game and shot 34.7 percent from three, plus he played solid defense. He was overpaid and certainly was brought in originally (two seasons ago) in part because he was a Rich Paul client (the agent of LeBron and Davis), but he has played solidly for them. This contract is at a reasonable rate, close to the league average.

The Lakers made decent moves to start rounding out their roster without Leonard, as much as could be expected with where the market stood on July 6. However, the fits are not going to be ideal at this point and it’s going to take adjusting throughout the season as well (both with trades and grabbing guys off waivers from other teams who fit).

 

Report: Terrence Ross signs four-year, $54 million deal to return to Magic

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Terrence Ross is heading back to the Orlando Magic.

As free agency opened on Sunday afternoon, Ross was reported to have signed a new four-year, $54 million deal with his current team. It was the big pay day that the Portland native has been searching for, and one that came after a great year for Ross.

Ross, 28, was an excellent spot-up shooter and pick-and-roll ball-handler for Orlando last year. He’s still an average defender, but he’s reasonable on that end of the floor and his contract isn’t exorbitant.

Via Twitter:

Orlando made the playoffs in the Eastern Conference last season, and it looks like they want to keep some of their core players. Ross was a vital wing for the Magic, and his new contract comes on the heels of a report that Nikola Vucevic will also be returning to Central Florida.

Ross’s deal puts the Magic in a bit of a sticky cap situation for this year, but moving forward the team should have some open space over the next two seasons to add some improvement around their core.

Clippers’ Lou Williams won second-straight, third overall Sixth Man of Year Award

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The Clippers bench play this season was the reason they made the playoffs (and pushed the Warriors to six games in the first round). Montrezl Harrell blossomed into his own as part of that.

However, it was Lou Williams who made it all work, which is why he won his second straight (and third overall) Sixth Man of the Year Award on Monday night. He garnered 96 of the 100 first-place votes.

Williams spoke from the heart about second chances and his faith in himself.

“Four years ago, I thought I was done, like I was coming to the end of my career,” Williams said.

Williams averaged 20 points a game and he is still one of the better bucket getters in the NBA, an isolation master. What he did better this year, however, was playmaking, dishing out 5.4 assists per game. His teammate Montrezl Harrell — the NBA’s best energy big off the bench last season who finished third in the Sixth Man voting — was the biggest beneficiary of those passes.

Indiana’s Domantas Sabonis came in second in the voting, with Spencer Dinwiddie of the Nets third and Terrence Ross of Orlando fifth. Here is the voting breakdown.

Kawhi Leonard scores 39, drills three in final minute to beat Sixers

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If you’ve ever swam in the ocean, you know it when you feel it. It’s a slow realization, as you paddle forward with no forward progress made. A thousand faint news stories flash across your mind, you try to quickly remember the best way to fight against a riptide. The only goal is to not get sucked even further into the abyss.

In large part, this has been the experience of the Toronto Raptors throughout much of their playoff history this decade. Toronto seems to be perennial losers, and not just because of former Eastern Conference foe LeBron James (although he hasn’t helped). The playoff performances of stars like Kyle Lowry, DeMar DeRozan, Jonas Valanciunas, Rudy Gay, and Terrence Ross have waxed and waned from year-to-year.

But now? Now the Raptors have Kawhi Leonard.

Sunday’s Game 4 matchup between the Raptors and the Philadelphia 76ers was a rough-and-tumble, drag-it-out fight between the second-round combatants. Toronto’s bench was better than it was in Game 3, and the Raptors avoided a third straight loss to even the series, 101-96.

Leonard scored 39 points to go with 14 rebounds and five assists. More important than that, Leonard gave Toronto a finish by a superstar who was not afraid of the continual pounding from Philadelphia. Jimmy Butler, who showed zero fear playing at home, could have easily been the victor of Sunday’s matchup. But Leonard was everywhere for his team.

The former San Antonio Spurs star scored or assisted on four of Toronto’s seven buckets in the fourth quarter, and added three additional points on free throws. His dominance culminated in a 3-pointer with 1:01 left in the fourth quarter with both Joel Embiid and Ben Simmons draped all over him.

At the end of the shot clock, Leonard poured in a 3-pointer to give Toronto a four-point lead.

Via Twitter:

The rest of the Raptors squad was solid in a way that Leonard needed to backup his performance. Marc Gasol and Lowry combined to shoot 13-of-26, scoring a cumulative 30 points with 11 rebounds and 10 assists. Danny Green added 11 points, going 8-8 from the free-throw line.

Philadelphia was led by Butler, who scored 29 points to go with 11 rebounds and four assists. The entirety of the Sixers starting unit scored in double-figures, but no player on the bench matched that feat. Embiid scored 11 points — seven of which came from the charity stripe — and despite his near triple-double of eight rebounds and seven assists, the Cameroonian big man shot just 28.5 percent from the field. After the game, Embiid said he was battling an illness.

This series has been more interesting than many expected, but Leonard may just be the ultimate determining factor or Toronto. In years past, it wasn’t just Raptors fans who felt as though in a situation like Sunday, Toronto would fold. But Leonard changes the dynamic not just of the talent on this team, but its fortitude as well.

Kawhi Leonard has those big old claws, and allows him to pull even further against the current. Plus, his playoff experience tells him he knows he just needs to swim parallel to shore in order to get out of this current the Raptors are in. By evening the series on Thursday, 2-2, Leonard did just that.