T.J. Warren

Coby White astonished by Suns drafting Cameron Johnson No. 11 (video)

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North Carolina point guard Coby White – the Bulls’ No. 7 pick – was doing his NBA draft media session when the Suns chose North Carolina forward Cameron Johnson No. 11.

I recommend the video to see White’s emotions, but the the transcript captured his words:

Q. Cameron Johnson just went 11th. How do you react to that news?

COBY WHITE: Cam went 11th?

Q. Yeah, it’s right on the screen right there.

COBY WHITE: Wow. Wow. Wow, bro! That’s crazy. That’s so low, bro. Y’all know Cam? You don’t know how hard Cam worked. There’s a lot of people that doubt him. But wow, that’s crazy, bro. Wow, that’s so crazy. I’m so happy for him right now. Y’all don’t understand how happy I am for Cam. He proved it night in, night out that he deserves to be in the conversation for a lottery pick, man. He shot the ball like anybody I’ve never seen before in my life or played with. Wow. I’m getting chills up here.

I had a similar reaction – minus the deep happiness for Johnson, whom I’ve never met.

I was stunned.

Johnson ranked No. 27 on my board, and that wasn’t a major outlier. Johnson was a fifth-year senior who does little besides shoot. (At least he shoots very well). There are also long-term health concerns.

Suns general manager James Jones is definitely putting his stamp on the franchise. He traded T.J. Warren and the No. 32 pick to the Pacers, traded the No. 6 pick to the Timberwolves for the No. 11 pick and Dario Saric, traded for No. 24 pick Ty Jerome (another upperclassman) and gave undrafted Jalen Lecque an unusually large guarantee.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

Of all those moves yesterday, drafting Johnson so high was the eye-popping one.

It’s very cool White shared his joy for his teammate. That showed their bond and looked like a genuine moment.

But White also displayed a shock many of us were feeling, and that will probably be what gets remembered.

Winners and losers from 2019 NBA Draft

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Let’s just own this up front: Picking the winners and losers from a draft the night it happens is a fool’s errand. If we were doing this right, tonight we’d be picking the winners and losers of the 2016 NBA Draft, because it takes about that long to get a real sense of how teams did. (Denver with Jamal Murray, Toronto with Pascal Siakam, and the Bucks with Malcolm Brogdon nailed it; Philly did fine with Ben Simmons at No. 1, but Phoenix took Dragan Bender at No. 4 and misfired.)

That, however, is not the instant gratification world we live in.

So here are our winners and losers from the 2019 NBA Draft.

Winner:

The New Orleans Pelicans. Thanks, Captain Obvious. The Pelicans won the NBA Draft Lottery, so when the draft itself rolled around all they needed to do was not screw it up. They got it right and took Zion Williamson No. 1. That is a massive win. New Orleans gets the highest rated player in the draft since Anthony Davis, and the most marketable rookie probably since LeBron James. It may have been a no-brainer, it doesn’t make the night any less of a success.

As for the rest of their moves, David Griffin traded out of the No. 4 pick and turned it into the No. 8 pick (Jaxson Hayes), No. 17 pick (Nickeil Alexander-Walker), and the No. 35 pick (Marcos Louzada Silva of Brazil). There are some development projects in there, but we don’t need to see how they pan out to know the Pelicans still win because they drafted Zion Williamson.

Winner:

The Atlanta Hawks. Atlanta moved up in the draft last year to get Trae Young, and a year later that seems a wise call. This year the Hawks moved up again, this time to the No. 4 pick to get De'Andre Hunter — the highest floor player in this draft whose first name doesn’t start with “Z.” Hunter is going to be a quality wing defender who can knock down shots and make plays on the perimeter, having a Trevor Ariza kind of impact. Put that with Young, John Collins, and Kevin Huerter, and you’ve got something to build on in the ATL. The Hawks also snapped up Duke’s Cam Reddish at No. 10, a player with All-Star level upside who should be able to thrive in the NBA with more space on the floor (at least that’s what his supporters say, Reddish needs to prove there’s not some Andrew Wiggins in him).

The Hawks were already League Pass favorites the second half of last season, this season they will be even more show-stopping with these pick ups.

Loser:

The Phoenix Suns. They came into the draft with the No. 6 pick and a glaring need at point guard, plus they could use some more consistent wing play. Jarrett Culver was on the board at six and would have been a good fit next to Devin Booker. Coby White, the third highest rated point guard in this draft, was on the board. Instead, the Suns traded down in a deal with the Timberwolves, picking up Dario Saric — a nice stretch four but one who hits restricted free agency next summer and will be expensive to keep — and the No. 11 pick, which they used on Cameron Johnson, a good shooter out of North Carolina, but one who has hip issues and most teams had in the 20s on their boards. Earlier in the day, the Suns traded in-demand T.J. Warren and the No. 32 pick to the Pacers for cash considerations.

So to recap: The Suns gave up Warren, didn’t take Culver, and surrendered the No. 32 pick for Cam Johnson and Dario Saric. Um… not good.

The Suns aren’t total losers because they got Ty Jerome at No. 24, a quality pickup at that spot, and maybe they get a good, veteran point guard in free agency. Still, their moves remain head scratching.

Winner:

The Cleveland Cavaliers. The Cavaliers are a bad, rebuilding team. It’s understandable in the wake of a title run and LeBron leaving, but that is their reality right now. They simply need more talent on the roster. That means they had one goal in this draft: Take the best player, the guy with the highest upside, regardless of position. The Cavaliers did that. At No. 5 they took Darius Garland, a player some teams had as high as third on their draft boards — and they did it despite the fact they had Collin Sexton on the roster. That’s how you draft, take the best players and sort it out later. Then they took high upside guys late in the first round: Dylan Windler out of Belmont at No. 28 (42.9 percent from three) and trading up to get Kevin Porter Jr. at No. 30. Maybe that pans out, maybe it doesn’t, but they were good gambles at that point in the draft on guys who could be steals that late.

Loser:

Bol Bol. He was a winner in this sense: Not everybody can pull off that suit, but he did.

However, a 7’2″ skilled big man who captured the imaginations of fans — and who some teams might have taken late in the first round — fell all the way down the board to No. 44, when the Miami Heat took him. Then immediately traded him to Denver. He’s got a lot of potential, but two things scared teams off. First was the foot injury that required two screws be put in his foot — those kinds of injuries in big men scare teams. Second, and even a more significant factor, were serious concerns about his work ethic and how much he loves the game. Is he going to put in the work? Still, to see him fall and all the players taken ahead of him at the start of the second round — once the contracts are no longer guaranteed — was stunning. And awkward as he sat in the NBA’s Green Room, waiting.

Winner:

R.J. Barrett. He desperately wanted to be a Knick. Now he is, New York took him No. 3. Barrett was leaning into it and the New York crowd all night. Good for him, Barrett has the potential to be an outstanding player in the NBA. He’s got the tools.

But be careful what you wish for… New York has chewed up and spit out a lot of good players.

Report: Suns trading T.J. Warren, No. 32 pick to Pacers

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Most rotation Pacers will hit free agency this summer.

That’s why Suns forward T.J. Warren was a logical target. The combo forward can provide insurance for Indiana losing Bojan Bogdanovic or Thaddeus Young.

Getting an extra second-round pick doesn’t hurt, either.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

The Suns now project to have about $21 million in cap space. They could use that then exceed the cap to re-sign Kelly Oubre.

Or they renounce Oubre and open about $29 million in cap space. But in that scenario, they could no longer exceed the cap to re-sign Oubre.

There’s plenty of pressure now on Phoenix to optimize that cap room.

Warren (three years, $35.25 million remaining) might be overpaid. But he’s a good scorer who has refined his offensive game, becoming a solid 3-point shooter and reducing bad shots. He also avoids turnovers (in part because he doesn’t distribute much, but still). Defense is a weak spot, but Pacers center Myles Turner can erase mistakes in front of him.

This is a nice addition by Indiana with the second-round pick incoming.

The Pacers must open space to to acquire Warren. So, it seems highly unlikely all of impending free agents Bogdanovic, Young, Darren Collison and Cory Joseph will return. Indiana might even know one of those forwards is heading out, adding impetus for the trade.

But this is just good value for the Pacers, anyway.

Report: Mavericks, Pacers among teams interested in Suns’ T.J. Warren

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Phoenix traded for Kelly Oubre Jr. during last season, and for half a season he fit beautifully with Devin Booker at the two and Deandre Ayton at center. There was natural chemistry with potential to build upon.

That made T.J. Warren expendable, especially for a Phoenix team looking to clear cap space for a point guard and more talent on the roster. Warren, as well as Josh Jackson, have been available. Warren averaged 18 points a game last season before a bone bruise sidelined him for half a season, and he is owed a reasonable (by NBA standards) $35 million over the next three seasons.

Dallas and Indiana have interest in Warren, something first reported by Ian Begley of SNY and confirmed by others.

Warren is a solid rotation NBA wing, especially on a team that likes to play uptempo. He can knock down the three (42 percent last season, a massive jump from where he was earlier in his career) and is a guy who can get buckets (and explode for 25 or more a few times a season). His liability is on the other end, he’s not much of a defender.

There’s value in Warren, and he’s the kind of player who could be moved on Draft night. Or, maybe early in July. Something to watch as there is a lot of buzz around him right now.

Report: Former Hornets, Pelicans GM Jeff Bower may get “high ranking” job with Suns

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The Suns have a couple nice young players — Devin Booker is legit (don’t believe the haters), Deandre Ayton has potential, Kelly Oubre Jr. appears a good fit, guys like T.J. Warren and Josh Jackson might have roles — but the team needs a direction and a better-rounded roster. After firing GM Ryan McDonough at an odd time, then replacing him with an odder combo of people, Suns owner Robert Sarver is looking for the guy to give his team that direction.

Jeff Bower may be that guy, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN.

Phoenix Suns owner Robert Sarver has become focused on the candidacy of former Detroit and New Orleans general manager Jeff Bower to assume a high-ranking front-office role with the Suns, league sources told ESPN on Saturday.

Sarver has begun to inform other serious candidates that he’s retreating from them and moving toward a hiring that could be complete early next week, league sources told ESPN.

The idea is to have Bower guide James Jones, the current GM, who would keep his position and have trade power. Officially Bower would be a consultant, although he would have leverage.

This could be a good hire.

Bower has been around NBA front offices for decades and is well respected. Most recently he was the GM and day-to-day guy in Detroit under Stan Van Gundy (but Van Gundy had the hammer on deals and team direction). Before that, he was the Hornets GM where he made some wise draft picks — Chris Paul, David West, Baron Davis — but was squeezed by the odd ownership transfer there.

The biggest challenge for Bower if he gets the job? Keeping Sarver out of basketball operations. Saver has a reputation as a meddling owner who steps in over the basketball people to make calls on players and personnel. This is the owner who unleashed a bunch of goats in McDonough’s office without telling him (and those goats did what goats do, ate everything and defecated). Among the interesting tidbits along those lines is this note from Wojnarowski’s story.

Jones had sat in on interviews, along with Arizona Cardinals All-Pro receiver Larry Fitzgerald, league sources said.

Fitzgerald? Well, it’s a Sarver team. Bower would have his hands full.