Seth Curry

Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Ten best players not taken in 2019 NBA Draft

3 Comments

Fred VanVleet hounded Stephen Curry in the NBA Finals, hit big shots, and played an important role in the Toronto Raptors winning their first ever NBA title.

VanVleet was undrafted.

So was his teammate Jeremy Lin. And the Warriors’ Quinn Cook. Then there’s Seth Curry, Robert Covington, Kent Bazemore, Joe Ingles, Yogi Ferrell, Allonzo Trier, Jonathon Simmons, Langston Galloway, Matthew Dellavedova, Royce O'Neale, Maxi Kleber… and that’s just the tip of the iceberg of undrafted players making an impact in the NBA.

Who are the guys overlooked in the 2019 NBA Draft that teams may regret not snapping up? Here are our top 10:

Luguentz Dort, 6’4” shooting guard, Arizona State. He was the Pac 12 Freshman of the Year and his value at the next level is as a defender, he was tenacious as an on-ball guy (although not every scout is so sure about that). Some people thought he was a late first-round pick. What scared teams off? He’s a shooting guard who shot 30.7 percent from three last year. That has to improve (and reportedly has in workouts). OKC quickly locked him up after the draft.

He also has to become a better finisher at the rim, he was inconsistent there. But with his potential, it’s a surprise to see him go undrafted.

Naz Reid, 6’10” center, LSU. He has a world of potential, and while he’s a project big man, there were a lot of project bigs taken in this draft. Minnesota locked him up after the draft.

Reid can put the ball on the floor, shot better than 35 percent from three, has a good touch, and is the kind of big who could grab the board and bring the ball up himself. However, he seemed disinterested in defense (and occasionally offense) this season. Does he love basketball? That may have been the biggest reason he fell, but he has a chance to prove guys wrong.

Brian Bowen, 6’7″ wing, Sydney Kings. It didn’t take long after the draft for the Indiana Pacers to lock Bowen up.

Rather than play in college, Bowen went to Australia and played against men (and alongside Andrew Bogut). He’s got an NBA shooting touch, more confidence now, and knows how to play a physical game. It’s a surprise a team didn’t give him a shot before the Pacers.

Shamorie Ponds, 6’1” point guard, St. Johns. He’s got a lot of playground in his game, both for good and bad. He’s got impressive handles and uses that and some hesitation moves to get space and get to the rim or pull up for a jumper. After that, he’s got work to do. He has to get stronger, he has to be better at setting up teammates, his shot needs to be more consistent, and his defense needs to improve. A project, but if he puts in the work he could be a rotation guard in a few years.

DaQuan Jeffries, 6’5” wing, Tulsa. He has the raw tools to be a 3&D role player in the NBA — he’s very athletic, shooting range, he has a 7-foot wingspan — but it’s going to take a lot of development to get him there. Orlando is going to give him that chance.

Jeffries’ ball handling has to improve, and he has to be far more consistent. He had a good showing at the Portsmouth Invitational, which helped boost his draft stock, but just not enough.

Jontay Porter, 6’11” center, Missouri. The concern here is obvious — he has two ACL tears. He wasn’t the most athletic prospect to begin with, but the medical reports are the reason he fell out of the draft. Porter has skills as a shooter out to the arc and he plays a high IQ game, plus he fights hard for rebounds and tries on defense. Some team should bring him in this summer and give him a chance.

Terence Davis, 6’5” shooting guard, Mississippi. A guy who has moved up draft boards as the day got closer, but apparently not enough. He a good athlete he has been a decent shooter, if a bit streaky, but if he can become a more consistent shooter and add a little playmaking to his game, Davis can be a role player in the NBA. He’s got to improve his defense and accept a role, but if he can do that he can develop into a scorer off the bench in the league.

Louis King, 6’8” forward, Oregon. Teams see the potential for a stretch four in him, he shot 38.6% from three last season, but he’s just got to get stronger. He’s not quick enough to be a very switchable defender. That said, he can become a role player if he puts in the work — and that’s the big question. Reports have teams concerned about his work ethic and love of the game, and that likely doomed his chances. He has to repair that this summer.

Jalen Lecque, 6’4” guard, Brewster Academy. This is all about the potential. Lecque played last season at a prep school, not in college, he’s a top-shelf athlete with NBA wingspan (6’8.5”) who could be an impressive NBA defender. That’s why the Suns gave him a non-guaranteed contract.

Lecque is very, very raw, his shot isn’t there yet, the game seemed to move too fast for him at the Draft Combine, and there is a lot of development to do here. Still, gambling on a guy with athletic upside is a smart play.

Zach Norvell Jr., 6’5″ shooting guard, Gonzaga. In a league that needs shooting, Norvell can get red-hot and has ridiculous range. Yes, there were questions about his athleticism, and with that who he could defend, but considering who was taken it’s surprising to see a good shooter left on the sidelines.

• One Bonus note: Teams were not nearly as high on Tacko Falls as fans. Maybe he proves everybody wrong and pans out, but he has no range to his game. He’s an old-school style center in a league getting away from those kinds of players, and teams were concerned he cannot keep up with the pace of the NBA. This isn’t college where he can just be planted near the rim, plus he needs to get a lot stronger to compete inside in the NBA. He’ll get a Summer League invite, no doubt, but he has a lot of work to do to get where he wants to be.

Blazers start hot, again. Warriors come back, again, win in OT to eliminate Portland

1 Comment

Monday night saw the third installment in the Portland/Golden State movie franchise. We had seen this same plot in the last two films/games— Portland races out to an early lead thanks to unexpected hero, Golden State comes back and executes better down the stretch, then Golden State finds a way to win.

Monday night was just more dramatic.

It was almost the Meyers Leonard game — he had a career-best 25 points before the half and finished with 30 points on 12-of-16 shooting.

Adding to the drama, the Warriors delayed their comeback to the fourth quarter, but comeback they did.

Stephen Curry — who had a triple-double on the night and had 37 points to lead all scorers — sparked the comeback but was almost remembered for traveling with an exaggerated Harden step back rather than taking a potential game-winning two (and his brother Seth Curry was all over the travel call).

In the end, none of that mattered.

It was Draymond Green — who also had a triple-double with 18 points, 14 rebounds, and 11 assists — that hit a dagger three in OT off a Curry assist, and that proved to be too much for the Trail Blazers to overcome.

Golden State won 119-117 in a game of little defense, and with that takes the series in a 4-0 sweep.

The Warriors will now have nine days off to get Andre Iguodala, Kevin Durant, and DeMarcus Cousins healthy — all three sat out this game — before taking on either the Bucks or Toronto in the Finals (which will start in the East city).

Portland is done for the season, but they should look back with pride on the growth this team has shown. They found a third star in Jusuf Nurkic, and then without him still made it all the way to the Western Conference Finals. This season was a step forward for Portland, something to build on.

Portland just did not have the matchups or answers for Golden State.

Steve Kerr, without three guys who started Game 1 of the playoffs against the Clippers, threw out the kind of rotations usually seen on the second night of a back-to-back in January, but the Warriors depth came through. Kevon Looney had a strong game with 12 points and 14 rebounds. Shaun Livingston had eight points, Jordan Bell started and had 7.

More than depth, what separated the teams in this series was Golden State could crank up the defense when it needed it. The Warriors played with more defensive intensity in the fourth, holding the Trail Blazers to 6-of-23 shooting. In overtime, Portland shot 3-of-10.

The Warriors shot just 3-of-12 in overtime, but had five offensive rebounds and Green’s dagger three, and that was enough. They won a tough game without their stars. It’s the kind of win you expect from champions.

It’s a movie we have seen before.

Golden State cranks up defense, comes from 17 down to win dramatic Game 2

3 Comments

Portland is going to look back on this as a game — maybe THE road game — they should have won.

However, the history books will record this as another game where the Warriors were dominant in the third quarter, got 61 points from the Splash Brothers Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson, had Draymond Green and Andre Iguodala playing great defense, and the champions just made more plays down the stretch and won. As they have done so many times before.

Golden State held on for a dramatic 114-111 win that has them in command of the series up 2-0 heading to Portland for Game 3 Saturday.

“We stole that game,” Warriors coach Steve Kerr said afterward. “I thought they outplayed us for much of the night, the majority of the night, but we brought enough competitive fire to overcome their great play.”

Curry carried the Warriors offense for stretches of the night and finished with 37 points, although hitting just 4-of-14 from three. Thompson had 24 points, while Green had 16 points, 10 rebounds, 7 assists, and had his best game of these playoffs.

Damian Lillard led Portland with 23, while C.J. McCollum had 22. Seth Curry had 16 off the bench plus made a couple good defensive plays on his brother.

Portland was in control through much of the first half. Part of that was the Warriors returning to their sloppy ways with the ball — Golden State had 10 first-half turnovers leading to 18 Portland points — and showing a lack of intensity on defense.

However, the lead was more about what Portland did right, starting with shooting 11-of-22 from three in the first half. CJ McCollum had 16 points, Damian Lillard played within himself and handled the trapping defense with six assists and zero turnovers, and they had strong bench play with seven points each from Seth Curry (who also had a steal from his brother) and Rodney Hood.

More importantly, in the first half — and largely through the game — Portland cleaned up the defensive issues that were so glaring in Game 1. Bigs came out a little higher to contest Curry and Thompson, but also guys did better getting over screens to challenge.

In the third quarter, the Warriors came out taking the game more seriously, cranking up their defensive intensity, being much more aggressive with their traps. In particular, the Warriors locked in on Lillard, who had been both a playmaker and a scorer, and made his life more difficult. Green and Kevon Looney owned that end of the court. The defense sparked a 13-0 run and the Warriors briefly retook the lead, although it was tied after three.

The fourth was back-and-forth, but the Trail Blazers had a six-point lead in the final minutes.

Then the Warriors, as they do, found another level of intensity.

“We’ve done this before, I think our experience helped us,” Kerr said.

That new level of play was just enough. And a little too much for Portland.

Kevin Durant will not travel to Portland, will miss Games 3 and 4

1 Comment

If you believe Seth Curry, the Warriors are going to be a lot tougher to defend for a few more games.

After team doctors re-evaluated Kevin Durant before tipoff of Thursday, team president Bob Myers announced on NBC Sports Bay Area that Durant will not travel with the Warriors to Portland for games 3 and 4 of the Western Conference Finals.

Warriors GM Bob Myers told NBC Sports Bay Area’s Greg Papa on “SNC: Warriors Playoff Central” that Durant will stay in Oakland and rehab with Warriors trainer Rick Celebrini while the rest of the team battles the Blazers at Moda Center on Saturday and Monday.

In a subsequent press release, the Warriors said that Durant “has shown good progress” and will be re-evaluated in a week. That could be after Game 5 back in the Bay Area.

DeMarcus Cousins, who is recovering from a torn left quadriceps muscle suffered in the second game of the postseason, also will be evaluated in a week. The report says Cousins’ “has progressed to on-court work, but is still not ready for live action.”

Durant suffered a strained calf in Game 5 against Houston, back on May 8. It was expected to take a week or two to heal, and we are still within that timeframe. The Warriors are not going to rush them back because they have not felt threatened by the Trail Blazers.

With Stephen Curry leading a faster-paced, more motion-based offense, the Warriors have won Game 6 on the road and eliminated the Houston Rockets, then back home won Game 1 against the Trail Blazers.

Despite the claims of some talking heads seeking attention, the Warriors are not better without Durant. You’d need to repress the last two years of the NBA to think that. The Warriors are more fun, more entertaining, and still very good, but not better.

Seth Curry: Warriors harder to guard without Kevin Durant

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
5 Comments

If Kevin Durant didn’t know any better, he might think the Curry brothers are dissing him.

I think Durant does know better. But the comments are coming one after another.

First, when Durant got hurt against the Rockets, Warriors teammate Stephen Curry said, “During the timeout, we all looked at each other, and there were a couple smiles in terms of what that meant for us as a team and the guys that were going to need to step up in those moments. Again, next-man-up mentality.”

Now, Trail Blazers guard Seth Curry, via Sam Amick of The Athletic:

“I think they are harder to guard (without Durant),” Seth said. “They move around faster when he’s not out there. They’re definitely not a better team, but they’re harder to guard. Obviously, they play a different style of basketball when Steph and Klay (Thompson) are the focal points offensively, and we haven’t played that team in a while. We’ve got to reshift our focus and make some adjustments coming into Game 2.”

We went through this a couple years ago, when Tyronn Lue said the Celtics’ sets were harder to defend than Golden State’s.

In a very narrow sense, Lue and Seth Curry are correct. It’s harder to get in position against the Durant-less Warriors, who have much more ball and player movement without him. There are a lot of actions to stay on top of.

But Golden State is not easier to defend without Durant when it comes to the primary purpose of defense – preventing scoring. The Warriors don’t pressure defenses to keep up in the same ways when Durant plays, but he’s still an elite scorer. He doesn’t need complex sets to get good shots. So, the defensive game plan can be simpler to execute. It’s just harder to defend effectively.

Seth Curry essentially acknowledged this. When he said the Warriors definitely aren’t a better team without Durant, Seth Curry didn’t mean because of Durant’s defense. Seth Curry meant they’re better offensively with him. Lue, whose Cavaliers were in the midst of a rivalry with Golden State, might have been at least partially trying to tweak the Warriors.

And it’s not as if Golden State completely stagnates with Durant. He, Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green and Andre Iguodala still play plenty of beautiful basketball. But there is a give-and-take between style preferred by Durant and the style preferred by his star teammates and Steve Kerr.

As for Stephen Curry’s comments about smiling, the phrasing was weird. I think the idea was the Warriors, as competitors, relished this opportunity to prove themselves. Durant might even respect that.

He also might feel, if they want to prove themselves without him, he can give them that opportunity by leaving in free agency.

As I’ve said all along, this postseason run will matter toward Durant’s decision. His injury adds a wrinkle. How will Golden State play without him? How will he feel about that?

Another question: How will he receive what people say about the Warriors’ play without him?