Quinn Cook

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Report: Lakers to make LeBron James starting point guard

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The Lakers pitched LeBron James on playing more off the ball.

That plan predictably flopped.

His supporting cast was lacking. Though he indicated a desire to spend more time off the ball, when push came to shove, LeBron took over. Just like always.

This year, there won’t be any pretenses.

Chris Haynes of Yahoo Sports:

The new-look Los Angeles Lakers are heading into the 2019-20 season with the intention of starting LeBron James at point guard, league sources told Yahoo Sports.

The Lakers’ other options at starting point guard:

So, LeBron will now fill a position of need while opening a starting forward spot that can be filled by someone better than those other point guards. The Lakers could start Anthony Davis, DeMarcus Cousins and Kyle Kuzma in the frontcourt. But who besides Danny Green will defend opposing guards?

The Lakers could also start Green and either Kentavious Caldwell-Pope or Avery Bradley in a three-guard lineup with LeBron running the point but defending a forward. At that point, there wouldn’t be a massive difference in LeBron’s role relative to what he has always done.

No matter what, the offense will run through LeBron. By naming LeBron point guard, the Lakers just avoid starting another player who operates primarily with the ball. In the micro, this is a good, clarifying move.

In the macro, LeBron is 34 years old. If he’s tasked with bring up the ball and initiating the offense every time, that adds to his load. When playing forward next to a point guard, it’s easier for LeBron to defer at times.

Expect this to make the Lakers better – as long as LeBron’s health holds up.

Report: Lakers bringing back Alex Caruso for another season

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Fan favorite and hustling back up point guard Alex Caruso will be back with the Lakers.

With minutes available at the point, the Lakers went with a name they knew, a player who came up through their G-League program, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN.

Caruso will be fighting with Rajon Rondo and Quinn Cook for minutes.

Most likely Rondo will start at the point for the Lakers because he’s Rondo. There are politics to be played, veterans to be appeased. But the Lakers need to consider giving Caruso a real chance to get rotation minutes, he was +9.1 per 100 when on the court with LeBron last season.

The 6’5″ point guard out of Texas A&M has good size and defends his position well, and he plays well working off the ball, or he can run the show as a lead guard for a stretch. He isn’t a great shooter, but he took two threes a game in the 25 games he was in last season and hit them (48 percent), and with his size he’s a pretty good finisher at the rim. His handles aren’t quite where they need to be, but we’ll see what the hard worker looks like after a summer in the gym.

Outside Los Angles, Caruso gets a shrug from fans, but in LA he’s become a fan favorite and has looked like a rotation-level guard. Which is basically what Rondo and Cook are. We’ll see what kind of minutes Caruso gets, but he deserves a few.

Report: Lakers signing DeMarcus Cousins, Rajon Rondo

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Anthony Davis called the Pelicans losing DeMarcus Cousins and Rajon Rondotough.” Maybe relatedly, Davis decided to leave New Orleans.

Now, Davis, Cousins and Rondo will reunite with the Lakers.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Tania Ganguli of the Los Angeles Times:

The Lakers’ first several free-agent agreements were with players who contribute without the ball – Danny Green, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, JaVale McGee, Quinn Cook, Jared Dudley and Troy Daniels. That’s important on a team led by LeBron James, who should have the offense run through him.

Cousins and Rondo are departures from the strategy of loading up on complementary players.

LeBron can’t do everything alone. There’s a fine line between a helpful additional creator and someone who clashes with LeBron.

Both Cousins and Rondo appear to be past their peaks. Cousins, who turns 29 this summer, has missed substantial time the last couple years with a ruptured Achilles and torn quad. It’ll take major work for him to regain his star status or anything close to it. Rondo, 33, has exited his prime.

Cousins likely came cheap, maybe even a minimum contract. The market on him had cooled. Considering his upside, this was a fine bet by the Lakers based on basketball ability. He’s so skilled for his size. Cousins could work well enough with LeBron and Davis.

Rondo, on the other hand, has already shown to be a terrible fit with LeBron. Rondo might even be the Lakers’ starting point guard. Though the fit is awful, there aren’t many capable point guards remaining in free agency. The problem was the Lakers putting themselves in position where Rondo has even a case as the best option.

Cousins and Rondo also bring a lot of, um, personality to a team that already has plenty. There is risk of increasing locker room combustibility, even at their low salaries. As everyone predicted, that became a problem last season. Apparently, the Lakers aren’t too concerned about a repeat.

Ten best players not taken in 2019 NBA Draft

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Fred VanVleet hounded Stephen Curry in the NBA Finals, hit big shots, and played an important role in the Toronto Raptors winning their first ever NBA title.

VanVleet was undrafted.

So was his teammate Jeremy Lin. And the Warriors’ Quinn Cook. Then there’s Seth Curry, Robert Covington, Kent Bazemore, Joe Ingles, Yogi Ferrell, Allonzo Trier, Jonathon Simmons, Langston Galloway, Matthew Dellavedova, Royce O'Neale, Maxi Kleber… and that’s just the tip of the iceberg of undrafted players making an impact in the NBA.

Who are the guys overlooked in the 2019 NBA Draft that teams may regret not snapping up? Here are our top 10:

Luguentz Dort, 6’4” shooting guard, Arizona State. He was the Pac 12 Freshman of the Year and his value at the next level is as a defender, he was tenacious as an on-ball guy (although not every scout is so sure about that). Some people thought he was a late first-round pick. What scared teams off? He’s a shooting guard who shot 30.7 percent from three last year. That has to improve (and reportedly has in workouts). OKC quickly locked him up after the draft.

He also has to become a better finisher at the rim, he was inconsistent there. But with his potential, it’s a surprise to see him go undrafted.

Naz Reid, 6’10” center, LSU. He has a world of potential, and while he’s a project big man, there were a lot of project bigs taken in this draft. Minnesota locked him up after the draft.

Reid can put the ball on the floor, shot better than 35 percent from three, has a good touch, and is the kind of big who could grab the board and bring the ball up himself. However, he seemed disinterested in defense (and occasionally offense) this season. Does he love basketball? That may have been the biggest reason he fell, but he has a chance to prove guys wrong.

Brian Bowen, 6’7″ wing, Sydney Kings. It didn’t take long after the draft for the Indiana Pacers to lock Bowen up.

Rather than play in college, Bowen went to Australia and played against men (and alongside Andrew Bogut). He’s got an NBA shooting touch, more confidence now, and knows how to play a physical game. It’s a surprise a team didn’t give him a shot before the Pacers.

Shamorie Ponds, 6’1” point guard, St. Johns. He’s got a lot of playground in his game, both for good and bad. He’s got impressive handles and uses that and some hesitation moves to get space and get to the rim or pull up for a jumper. After that, he’s got work to do. He has to get stronger, he has to be better at setting up teammates, his shot needs to be more consistent, and his defense needs to improve. A project, but if he puts in the work he could be a rotation guard in a few years.

DaQuan Jeffries, 6’5” wing, Tulsa. He has the raw tools to be a 3&D role player in the NBA — he’s very athletic, shooting range, he has a 7-foot wingspan — but it’s going to take a lot of development to get him there. Orlando is going to give him that chance.

Jeffries’ ball handling has to improve, and he has to be far more consistent. He had a good showing at the Portsmouth Invitational, which helped boost his draft stock, but just not enough.

Jontay Porter, 6’11” center, Missouri. The concern here is obvious — he has two ACL tears. He wasn’t the most athletic prospect to begin with, but the medical reports are the reason he fell out of the draft. Porter has skills as a shooter out to the arc and he plays a high IQ game, plus he fights hard for rebounds and tries on defense. Some team should bring him in this summer and give him a chance.

Terence Davis, 6’5” shooting guard, Mississippi. A guy who has moved up draft boards as the day got closer, but apparently not enough. He a good athlete he has been a decent shooter, if a bit streaky, but if he can become a more consistent shooter and add a little playmaking to his game, Davis can be a role player in the NBA. He’s got to improve his defense and accept a role, but if he can do that he can develop into a scorer off the bench in the league.

Louis King, 6’8” forward, Oregon. Teams see the potential for a stretch four in him, he shot 38.6% from three last season, but he’s just got to get stronger. He’s not quick enough to be a very switchable defender. That said, he can become a role player if he puts in the work — and that’s the big question. Reports have teams concerned about his work ethic and love of the game, and that likely doomed his chances. He has to repair that this summer.

Jalen Lecque, 6’4” guard, Brewster Academy. This is all about the potential. Lecque played last season at a prep school, not in college, he’s a top-shelf athlete with NBA wingspan (6’8.5”) who could be an impressive NBA defender. That’s why the Suns gave him a non-guaranteed contract.

Lecque is very, very raw, his shot isn’t there yet, the game seemed to move too fast for him at the Draft Combine, and there is a lot of development to do here. Still, gambling on a guy with athletic upside is a smart play.

Zach Norvell Jr., 6’5″ shooting guard, Gonzaga. In a league that needs shooting, Norvell can get red-hot and has ridiculous range. Yes, there were questions about his athleticism, and with that who he could defend, but considering who was taken it’s surprising to see a good shooter left on the sidelines.

• One Bonus note: Teams were not nearly as high on Tacko Falls as fans. Maybe he proves everybody wrong and pans out, but he has no range to his game. He’s an old-school style center in a league getting away from those kinds of players, and teams were concerned he cannot keep up with the pace of the NBA. This isn’t college where he can just be planted near the rim, plus he needs to get a lot stronger to compete inside in the NBA. He’ll get a Summer League invite, no doubt, but he has a lot of work to do to get where he wants to be.

Here’s what Warriors were thinking on Stephen Curry’s final shot

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If I told you that Stephen Curry was going to get the final shot to stave off elimination in an NBA Finals game, nobody would bat an eye. But on Thursday night as the Golden State Warriors took on the Toronto Raptors in Game 6 of the 2019 NBA Finals, many were left scratching their heads about the play called for Curry that would have saved their season.

With 9.6 seconds to go and the Warriors down by just one point, Golden State had a sideline out-of-bounds play drawn up. It began with a series of crosses between Draymond Green, Quinn Cook, and Curry.

Initially it appeared that Cook might be open on the near corner. Nobody would put it past Kerr to call a play with an option for a role player: remember it was the Warriors coach who famously said that only fans want star players to take the final shot because “people are idiots”.

But in classic Warriors fashion, the play was more devious than that. Andre Iguodala‘s inbound pass went to the far side of the floor — nearly out of play — to Green, who was being fronted by Pascal Siakam. As the pass came in, Curry rounded a screen at the top of the arc by DeMarcus Cousins.

The pass across the court, although it looked wild, was purposeful. Much like the Golden State offense itself, the travel of the ball was implemented as a way to draw the eyes of off-ball defenders away from what was really happening. As the pass went to Green, Serge Ibaka naturally started to float that direction and ball watch. As he did so, he turned his back on the most dangerous shooter in NBA history.

That’s exactly what the Warriors wanted.

With Fred VanVleet still fighting over Cousins’ screen, and Ibaka’s attention locked onto Green, the space Golden State wanted was created. Ibaka was a step too far into the lane to recover tightly on Curry. Miraculously, the Warriors guard was open on the far side, right next to Green and ready for a pass.

Of course, the result of the play was a clanked shot for Curry and a scuffle for the ball that wound up with Green calling a timeout the Warriors didn’t have. A cluster of officiating took the gas out of the initial Raptors celebration, but the result was the first-ever Finals win for Toronto.

Some may still argue that it was a poor shot for Golden State. Fine. The Warriors created the space they needed, and if there is a guy you want taking that shot, Curry has to be one of the top choices. This play is a Brad Stevens extravaganza that has been run with success before, so it’s not as wild as everyone has made it out to be.

There were a lot of factors that led to Golden State losing this game, and the final shot was not the most important one. Injuries, depth, and defensive prowess are probably higher up the list for Kerr.

Meanwhile, Curry is going to want to have that one back. No doubt this Golden State team will be jonesing for another chance at an NBA Finals appearance next year.