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Report: Lakers coaching staff urged Magic Johnson to re-sign Brook Lopez and Julius Randle

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Lakers president Magic Johnson’s decisions last summer mostly backfired. (LeBron James signing with the Lakers was LeBron’s, not Johnson’s, decision.)

The Lakers let Julius Randle and Brook Lopez walk in free agency then signed Rajon Rondo, Lance Stephenson and Michael Beasley.

Randle is having a solid season for the Pelicans. Lopez is thriving with the Bucks.

Rondo, Stephenson and Beasley have collectively underwhelmed. The Lakers will almost certainly miss the playoffs.

The consequence in Los Angeles: Lakers coach Luke Walton will probably get fired after the season.

But maybe Walton tried to get himself a better roster.

Bill Oram of The Athletic:

Johnson ignored the pleas of the coaching staff that he retain Brook Lopez and Julius Randle.

Let’s assume this happened. Did the coaching staff have any unheeded roster advice that doesn’t look as good in hindsight? That probably won’t leak to the public. This is selective and self-serving.

NBA coaches generally must earn roster input. Walton hadn’t. The Lakers were bad last season with Walton coaching Lopez and Randle.

Though Randle seemingly made expected progress given his age, Lopez was really unlocked by Milwaukee coach Mike Budenholzer. That might not have happened with Walton in Los Angeles.

Nobody deserves more blame for the Lakers’ failures than Johnson, who assembled an ill-fitting roster abound LeBron. Johnson must do better this summer.

But listening more to Walton isn’t the simple answer.

Report: Pelicans blame Lakers for leaking Anthony Davis trade-talk details

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The Pelicans are rumored to have deliberately sabotaged the Lakers’ chemistry through Anthony Davis trade negotiations. Lakers president Magic Johnson said the Pelicans didn’t act in good faith during trade talks. Lakers owner Jeannie Buss called it “fake news” Los Angeles offered its entire roster despite nine players – Lonzo Ball, Kyle Kuzma, Brandon Ingram, Josh Hart, Ivica Zubac, Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, Rajon Rondo, Lance Stephenson and Michael Beasley – reportedly being offered in various proposals.

Are the Lakers the victim here?

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

Throughout the two-week saga stemming from Davis’ trade request, the Pelicans became frustrated about how public the Lakers-initiated discussions had become.

“We get off the phone with (the Lakers), and a minute later, offers are out there,” one Pelicans source with direct knowledge of discussions told The Athletic.

Lakers superstar LeBron James made these trade negotiations public before they even began between the teams, saying he wanted to play with Davis. The Lakers clearly negotiated through the media, too.

Quibble with the methodology, but the Lakers were right to strongly pursue Davis. He’s a special player.

They’re just dealing with the fallout now.

Presumably, the Lakers will try again to acquire Davis this summer. How will they build trust with New Orleans then?

The Pelicans will likely have the same owner, Gayle Benson, and same New Orleans Saints influence that dug in their heels against sending Davis to Los Angeles. Though general manager Dell Demps got fired, interim and potential long-term replacement Danny Ferry was in the organization for prior trade talks, too.

The Celtics are in the driver’s seat for Davis because of their rich pool of assets. The Lakers’ disconnect with the Pelicans doesn’t hurt, either.

Failure of LeBron’s Lakers this season piles on pressure to win offseason again

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LOS ANGELES — It was a surreal moment:

LeBron James — sitting in front of his locker with his feet in an ice bucket, more ice wrapped around his knees and lower back — was talking about something unthinkable in his previous 15 seasons: shutting it down early because he needs to think long-term.

“Well, I mean, that’s a conversation that would probably be had between me and Luke [Walton]…” LeBron said. “We didn’t take care of business, so you kind of look at the rest of the games, and the percentages of what’s going on there in the future, and see what makes more sense not only for me but the team itself as well.”

At one point Monday night in a crushing loss to the across-the-hall Clippers, LeBron grabbed his groin (the injury that sidelined him for 17 games) and asked out. That loss leaves the Lakers playoff chances are all but dead, which leads to reflection about what is best now for the 34-year-old LeBron.

Father time seems to be winning the race (as he always does). What we have not seen this season, particularly since his return from injury, is the LeBron who just takes over games. The guy who carried the Cavaliers to the Finals last season. LeBron has put up good numbers — he had 27 points on 18 shots against the Clippers Monday — but he has rarely been able to summon up his otherworldly dominant self that just wins games by force of will.

What the Lakers also lack is a team that can lift LeBron up when he stumbles — and that goes back to decisions made last July that prioritized maintaining cap space for the summer of 2019. From the start the Lakers called this a multi-year process and prioritized having the cap space to bring in another star next to LeBron over everything.

However, missing the playoffs in year one of the LeBron era was not part of the plan. It just piles on the pressure on the Lakers’ brain trust of Magic Johnson and Rob Pelinka to repeat what they did last summer and win the offseason. Again.

If not, the LeBron experiment in Los Angeles likely ends without banners and parades.

•••••••••••••••••••

The Lakers won the last offseason on July 1, the moment LeBron announced he was coming to Los Angeles. LeBron didn’t drag out the process and listen to everyone’s pitches as he had in the past, he made his call early then hopped on a plane with his family to go on vacation.

What followed was a plan that had the NBA shaking its head — surround the Lakers’ new star with playmakers, not shooters as had been the case during LeBron’s eight straight trips to the finals. LeBron reportedly pushed for this, he wanted someone else (or someones else) to be able to create shots, he didn’t want to be the only focal point of the offense. Magic and Pelinka bought in.

Except that the Lakers also needed to preserve max cap space to potentially get LeBron a running mate in the summer of 2019, so they were only handing out one-year contracts. In their minds, that meant letting Julius Randle walk, now he is averaging 20.5 points and 8.7 rebounds a game for the Pelicans, setting himself up for a healthy pay raise next summer. It meant letting Brook Lopez walk, and he has been critical in turning the Bucks into the NBA’s best regular season team.

It meant one-year deals for the free agents who had no choice but to take one-year deals — Rajon Rondo, Lance Stephenson, JaVale McGee, and Michael Beasley. When you look at who has struggled for the Lakers during this recent critical stretch of losses, it’s those guys, not the young stars like Brandon Ingram or Lonzo Ball. The hand-picked veteran playmakers have let the Lakers down. Well, except for Michael Beasley, because he’s out of the league and playing in China.

•••••••••••••••••••

It’s a fun parlor game among league front offices, and especially among Lakers fans: The blame game with the Lakers for missing the playoffs again.

Luke Walton will be the fall guy and deserves a slice of the blame pie. His lineups have been odd, he’s leaned on veterans even when they have not been good, and when adversity hit he could not get everyone to pull the rope in the same direction.

Injuries certainly have played a big role, although every team battles injuries and the best keep winning (Denver’s starting five has played fewer than 200 minutes together this season, the Thunder have never had Andre Roberson, etc). LeBron himself is taking more heat than he has seen in years. In Cleveland (and to a lesser degree Miami), he got credit when the team won but the losses just rolled off his back and the blame hit teammates or the front office. Not in Los Angeles. Healthy or not, LeBron has not been as dominant.

However, the largest piece of the blame pie for this season has to go to Magic Johnson and Rob Pelinka — the president and general manager, the brain trust of Lakers basketball operations. Their roster construction doomed this team.

They prioritized maintaining cap space for next summer to land another star.

Then, at the trade deadline, came the very public process of chasing Anthony Davis. Not only did the Lakers never really get close in negotiations, but every young Laker on the roster also heard their names in trade talks. As it does with virtually every young NBA player, it shook them. The players were questioning if LeBron wanted to play with them. The hustle and spark of the Lakers has not been the same since.

It has all come together to form a tidal wave of uninspired play that has the Lakers about to miss the playoffs for the sixth consecutive year, a franchise record.

But the Lakers have that cap space.

•••••••••••••••••••

The failure to make the playoffs both ramps up the pressure to bring in another star and makes it a little more difficult. Is there really an elite free agent looking at the Lakers situation from the outside right now — the roster construction, the bright lights of media scrutiny for the franchise, the impatient fan base — and thinking it is the most desirable place to be?

That said, the Lakers are still a draw. The chance to capitalize on the marketing opportunities in Los Angeles, and the chance to win with LeBron, will still tempt free agents.

Just maybe not the guys at the top of the free agent board.

Kawhi Leonard has been predictably mum on free agency, but Toronto has a chance to retain him. Plus, I had heard from sources as far back as Summer League that he didn’t like the idea of the brighter spotlight and drama that comes with playing next to LeBron on the Lakers, which is why he was leaning Clippers if he leaves Canada.

Kevin Durant called the media and environment around LeBron “toxic,” which is a clear indication he’s not thinking Lakers if (or more likely when) he bolts the Bay Area. (It should be noted Durant didn’t mean that as a shot at LeBron as much as the social media and noise around LeBron right now.)

Nobody thinks Klay Thompson is leaving the Warriors unless they lowball him, and with Durant eyeing greener pastures, there is no way the Warriors don’t max Thompson out, according to reports. He stays put.

Who is left? Is Jimmy Butler a fit next to LeBron? Kyrie Irving and LeBron have patched up their differences, but that’s very different from joining forces again. Kemba Walker might be the best fit of this tier of players, but does he want to leave Charlotte and come West?

The Lakers also are not out of the Anthony Davis sweepstakes. What happens in the East playoffs, particularly with slumping Boston, could have a big say in that team’s offseason moves and how much they would throw into a trade for Davis. Also, which team wins the draft lottery and the right to draft Zion Williamson can be a player in the trade talks. Most importantly, will the new GM of the Pelicans, whoever that may be, value the young Laker players differently than the former GM Dell Demps, who was unimpressed? Can the Lakers flip a couple of those young players into a player/players the Pelicans do want?

There are a lot of moving parts. This summer is going to be wild and unpredictable, and it’s going to take deft management to sail through those turbulent waters.

Do Magic and Pelinka have that in them?

Lakers fans need to hope they do. If the Lakers don’t dominate the off-season again, the surreal and disappointing moments around the team will only multiply.

Report: Lakers pausing talks with Carmelo Anthony

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LeBron James has quietly and not-so-quietly said he wants the Lakers to sign Carmelo Anthony.

The Lakers have seemed less interested.

They reportedly would sign him only if they had an open roster spot and didn’t have to waive anyone. Well, they opened a roster spot just before the trade deadline by dealing Ivica Zubac and Michael Beasley. A tepid buyout market left few other candidates for that vacancy. If the Lakers didn’t want Anthony, they were were running out of excuses for not signing him.

But they stumbled into a rationalization. And I mean stumbled.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

The Los Angeles Lakers and free agent Carmelo Anthony are pausing talks on a possible contract agreement unless the franchise makes a turn back toward pursuit of Western Conference playoffs contention, league sources told ESPN.

The Lakers had been leaning toward signing Anthony for the rest of the season — until losses in four of the past five games left the organization and Anthony’s camp wondering if it made sense to bring Anthony, 34, into an unsettled environment with suddenly so little chance of making the playoffs, league sources said.

If a washed-up Carmelo Anthony – regardless of the Lakers being on the same page or not – decided he didn’t want to sign in Los Angeles, this replaces LeBron throwing an inbound pass off the back of the backboard in a loss to the Suns as the Lakers’ low point this season.

I do wonder how much of this is spin, the Lakers coming up with a justification for not signing a player they never wanted to sign or Anthony finding a story to explain why he remains unsigned – or both.

The Lakers missing the playoffs would be embarrassing. At 4.5 games and two teams out, they’re a huge longshot to reach the postseason. But they have to try. Having LeBron in his prime demands it.

I never thought Anthony would help this team. But if they thought a week ago Anthony was the right player to help them win, I’m not sure why that assessment changes now.

Perhaps, the Lakers never actually believed Anthony was that player. The Rockets showed great care to protect Anthony’s ego, and maybe the Lakers are just being similarly considerate.

We’ll get a better idea of what actually happened here if and when Anthony signs elsewhere.

Former Lakers forward Michael Beasley signing in China

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Before the season, Michael Beasley said the Lakers “can be exactly where we want to be at the end of the year.”

I doubt he envisioned himself being in China.

But that’s where he’s headed after getting traded to and waived by the Clippers.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Beasley has played in China twice before and dominated. High-volume scorers like him translate well.

At 30, Beasley might be nearing the end of his NBA chances. He can still contribute a little, but the bar is higher for someone who brings headaches and silliness.

If he again plays well in China, he’ll probably get another chance with an NBA team next season. But that’s certainly not a lock.