Martell Webster

Wizards’ Webster expected to miss season after hip surgery

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WASHINGTON (AP) — Washington Wizards forward Martell Webster is expected to miss the entire NBA season after having surgery on his right hip.

The team says Webster’s operation, in Tennessee on Friday, repaired the labrum and damaged cartilage in his hip.

He has not appeared in a game this season because of the injury.

Webster, who signed a four-year contract with the Wizards in 2013, had surgery to repair a herniated disc in his lower back in June 2014 and appeared in only 32 games last season.

A first-round draft pick in 2005, Webster has averaged 8.7 points and 3.1 rebounds for his career. He turns 29 next month.

Wizards’ Martell Webster to be out for season after hip surgery

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We told you back before the Wizards’ season tipped off it could come to this. The bone spur in Martell Webster‘s hip kept him out of training camp, but he wanted to find an alternative to surgery, or maybe just play through it. He didn’t want to go under the knife.

Webster will go under the knife Friday, and it will end his season reports J. Michael at CSNMidAtlantic.com.

Martell Webster has tried to gut out the pain in his right hip, which has a tear in the connective tissue because of a bone chip, but he will have surgery on it Friday, CSNmidatlantic.com has confirmed, which will end his season without ever starting.

As a result, the Wizards will file for a Disabled Player Exception with the NBA which gives them the option of acquiring a 15th player at half of his $5.5 million salary slot. They also can acquire a player via trade but he’d have to be in the final year of his contract.

The recovery from this injury could last more than nine months and bleed into next year’s training camp. Webster is under contract for next season, but with a $2 million buyout the Wizards may consider. I expect the buyout will happen.

Webster never got a chance to see how he would fit with the small-ball Wizards this season due to the injury. The 10-year NBA veteran has averaged 8.7 points a game over the course of his career.

 

Wizards’ Martell Webster may need season-ending hip surgery

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He wants to try every alternative first. Or maybe just try to play through it.

But the bone spur in Martell Webster‘s hip that has sidelined him through the Wizards’ training camp until his first practices Tuesday — the thing that has kept him from trying to find his place in Washington’s new small ball style — could mean the end of his season.

Webster may need surgery, reports J. Michael at CSNWashington.com.

“When it gets to the point that nothing’s happening, the hip’s not getting better … I don’t know just go back to the drawing board and see if surgery is the best solution after exhausting all avenues,” Webster said Wednesday from the floor of Amway Center, where the Wizards will make their regular-season debut tonight vs. the Orlando Magic.

“I played the whole practice yesterday. Felt good. Literally on my last shot, after practice when we were getting up our spot shots, my last shot is when it started to flare up again. (Expletive) I probably could’ve given 10 minutes tonight if that hadn’t happened.”

Surgery would sideline him 4-6 months, very possibly ending his season. Could hip surgery spell the end of Webster’s 10-year career? He doesn’t see it that way.

“Yeah, of course,” Webster said when asked if he again thought about his career ending before he reaches 30… “But I don’t think me not playing again is in the foreseeable future, like in the next year or two. Now I could still play. If I got this surgery it’s not a career-ending surgery. It’s just a bone spur that’s rubbing up against my labrum. If I got the surgery, just go in and shave it off so that it doesn’t rub up against my labrum anymore. It’s not something that’s going to end my career. I’m not worried about that. I’ve got a lot of basketball left in me.”

Injuries have plagued Webster’s career, including limiting him to 32 games last season — and when he did play he was not good (his PER of 5.9 is a good way to sum that up). In theory Webster could be the kind of 3&D guy Washington could use, but if he can’t get healthy he can’t prove it.

The Wizards can buy out his contract for next season for $2.5 million, and even if he were healthy a team looking to land a big name free agent — *cough* Kevin Durant *cough* — would likely send him packing to free up the cap space. If Webster is going to land anywhere and play again, he needs to get and prove he can stay healthy.

That just may mean season-ending surgery.

Wizards’ Martell Webster still out with hip injury

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The Wizards planned to use Martell Webster as a stretch four in their revamped offense this season.

One problem: He hasn’t been healthy enough to play this preseason.

That might not change anytime soon.

Jorge Castillo of The Washington Post:

The eccentric 10-year veteran has been sidelined since the beginning of October with a sore right hip, which he said is arthritic, and recently traveled to Nebraska for a second opinion, according to people with knowledge of the situation.

When he will be able to return remains unclear.

For the Wizards to play smaller and faster, they need productive wings to eat minutes at shooting guard, small forward and power forward. Alan Anderson is out. I wouldn’t count on Webster, who has been hit hard by injuries over his career. Kelly Oubre is just a rookie.

At least Jared Dudley plans to return by the season opener. But are he, Bradley Beal, Otto Porter, Gary Neal and Oubre enough?

Washington has been starting Kris Humphries at power forward in the preseason, and he’s a better shooter than Nene, who’s headed for a reserve role. But Humphries is still a fairly typical power forward.

These injures seem to be limiting the Wizards’ ability to change their identity as much as they desired.

Report: Nene will come off bench for Wizards

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The Wizards reportedly tried trading Nene this summer.

Unable to find a taker, they’re keeping him – but apparently demoting him.

Jorge Castillo of The Washington Post:

Barring injury or a sudden strategy revision, Nene, a 13-year NBA veteran who has been a starter his entire career, will regularly come off the bench and play center — an assignment he has not exactly enjoyed in the past — behind Marcin Gortat. The expected change comes as the Wizards switch to a new read-and-react, pace-and-space offense that will utilize lineups with four three-point shooters and one big man more often.

“I have no clue,” a blunt Nene, 33, said Saturday. “That’s the coach’s decision.”

It had been clear the Wizards would use Nene and Gortat together less often this season, but it seemed the duo would still start.

Apparently, the preseason changes will be permanent. Gortat started Washington’s first two preseason games at center, and Nene got the nod against Bauru last night. Kris Humphries started at power forward in all three.

The Wizards mostly went big during the regular season last year, but they went small in last year’s playoffs – playing Otto Porter over Nene and sliding Paul Pierce to power forward – to great success. Here’s Washington’s offensive/defensive/net ratings in the postseason:

John Wall, Bradley Beal, Pierce and Gortat:

  • With Nene: 91.5/103.6/-12.1 in 92 minutes
  • With Porter: 125.2/103.9/+21.3 in 51 minutes

Even after Wall got hurt and Ramon Sessions become the Wizards primary point guard, the big/small splits remained similar.

Sessions, Beal, Pierce and Gortat:

  • With Nene: 99.0/109.8/-10.8 in 36 minutes
  • With Porter: 123.9/116.6/+7.3 in 27 minutes

But who becomes the stretch four now that Pierce is with the Clippers?

Humphries has more range than Nene, but not all the way to the 3-point arc. Drew Gooden has shown improved shooting as he has aged.

Those are both somewhat traditional big men, though.

If the Wizards really want to duplicate their success with Pierce, they have a few wings who could slide down – Jared Dudley (once healthy), Martell Webster and Porter. Their ability to play power forward will depend on the production of Washington’s other wings – Alan Anderson, Gary Neal and Kelly Oubre. The rookie Oubre is a particular wildcard.

Good for Randy Wittman working outside his comfort zone. He has often preferred to play big, even when statistics indicated it was a mistake. He’ll surely use Nene and Gortat together when matchups dictate, but there’s clearly a new normal in Washington.

Pierce, who has excelled at power forward the last couple years, set the stage for this transition. The Wizards aren’t quite as equipped to play this way without him, but their ceiling rises as a small, running team. It’s on Wittman to mix and match player combinations to find the right fit.