Marcus Smart on shoving Joel Embiid, getting ejected: ‘I’ll do it over again’

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Marcus Smart losing his cool, shoving Joel Embiid to the floor, and getting ejected in the third quarter against Philadelphia — after Embiid gave Smart some shoulder when setting a screen — led to a collective shaking of the head in Boston. The Celtics were up 11 when it happened and they need Smart and his defense on the court, and he lost his composure. Then the Celtics lost the game. Then Smart got fined $50,000.

Smart himself, not so filled with regret. He said he would do it again.

The instinct to “protect” himself is a natural one, although if you say the game isn’t physical enough then you have to accept the physicality.

But Smart has to think time and place — Smart got ejected at in a terrible spot. It’s part of the reason the Celtics lost an important Eastern Conference showdown (the ejection also fired up Embiid, who scored the next 8 points for the Sixers). There are times to get revenge if it is warranted, but Smart didn’t think that way, he just reacted emotionally. And it cost him and the team.

The playoffs are coming, emotions will be high, and Smart has to be, well, smarter than that.

 

 

Celtics’ Marcus Smart fined $50,000 for shoving Joel Embiid to ground

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Marcus Smart — the guy who days before said he thought the NBA should be more physical — lost his cool on Wednesday night against the Sixers when things got physical.

It cost him. Twice.

The first was his ejection from the game, where is his teammates missed his defense — Boston was up 11 when the incident happened but this fired up Joel Embiid (he scored the next eight Sixers’ points) and eventually Philadelphia came back to win the game.

It’s also going to cost Smart a cool $50,000, the league announced Thursday. Smart was fined for “forcefully shoving Philadelphia 76ers center Joel Embiid to the floor.” However, this is double the normal NBA fine for these kinds of incidents, which came down because Smart has a history:

“Smart’s fine was also based on his repeated acts of unsportsmanlike conduct during NBA games, including two prior incidents this season which have resulted in fines,” the league said.

Embiid received a technical on the play for his foul on Smart when setting the screen. Smart can’t react like that, however.

Three Things to Know: Joel Embiid in middle of everything leading Sixers past Celtics

Associated Press
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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Joel Embiid in middle of everything leading Sixers past Celtics. Bench play? Philadelphia don’t need no stinkin’ bench play.

When GM Elton Brand made the mid-season trades to bring in Jimmy Butler and Tobias Harris, he sacrificed depth to create the best starting five in the East: Ben Simmons, J.J. Redick, Butler, Harris, and Joel Embiid. For one night at least, it worked the way Brand envisioned it — the Sixers starters scored 110 of the teams’ 118 points, were +11 on the night, and propelled the Philadelphia to a confidence-boosting win over Boston, 118-115.

Joel Embiid was the instigator in the middle of it all. Before and after the game.

It’s not just the 37 points and 22 rebounds, although the Sixers don’t win without that performance. Embiid also was the guy who elbowed Marcus Smart on a screen — then Smart lost his cool, wildly overreacted in shoving Embiid to the floor, which earned Smart an ejection (and a fine in the next 48 hours).

Boston was never the same after that.

Embiid scored the next eight points after the ejection, and the fired-up big man was a force the rest of the way. Embiid bullied his way inside — determined to show he can score on Al Horford — and in doing so led an attacking style that got Philly to the free throw line 46 times in the game. Also late in the game, Boston ran plays to get Kyrie Irving switched onto Embiid and both times Embiid got the stop, including one impressive recovery and block.

Then in the final minutes, the Sixers turned the keys over the Jimmy Butler — he had two critical threes, then a dagger jumper along the baseline followed by a meme-worthy celebration.

After the game, Embiid stayed the center of attention with this interview where he said he was the most unstoppable player in the NBA (somewhere James Harden’s eyebrows raised).

If you’re a Sixers fan, there were certainly things to like out of this win, particularly down the stretch. They now have a matchup that works against Boston — they went right at Kyrie Irving’s defense and bullied him inside, then shot over him. Having Smart on the court would help Boston, but it doesn’t completely solve that problem. With this Sixers starting five, there is no place to hide Irving.

(Not that a meeting of these teams in the playoffs is any kind of lock, the Sixers are looking like the three seed, Boston will be four or five, meaning if they meet it will be the Eastern Conference Finals. And if that happens both teams will have evolved since this game.)

That said, there are Sixers questions still, specifically can they lean on the starters like this in the playoffs (Simmons played 42 minutes, Embiid 41)? There are no back-to-backs and more rest is built in, but it’s still asking a lot and at points Philly is going to need something from its bench. With staggered minutes for the starters the weaknesses can be hidden better in the postseason, but the bench still needs to step up. It’s a puzzle for Brett Brown to put together.

What we know now is this: These starters make the 76ers a threat and can take them a long way in the playoffs.

2) James Harden drops 57, Rockets still lose in overtime to the Grizzlies. Interesting stat of the night: James Harden has seven 50+ point games this season, but the Rockets are 4-3 in those games.

The one-man Harden show was back and it carried the Rockets again — he scored 28 of his 57 points on the night in the fourth quarter and overtime, and had 15 during a 17-2 Rockets late run. That included three free throws to tie the game and force OT after a ridiculously bad foul by Justin Holiday. The kind of foul that will give J.B. Bickerstaff an ulcer.

However, the Grizzlies are scrappy, and as an organization they are trying to win — they have to give a pick to Boston one of the next three years, they would rather do it this season. The pick is top 8 protected this draft, and currently Memphis has the seventh worst record in the league. If the standings do not change Memphis has a 14.2 percent chance of giving up the pick, but make up the 1.5 games it is behind Washington and that jumps to nearly 40 percent. Memphis wants to win games.

Jonas Valanciunas got the memo and helped them do that. He grabbed the offensive rebound and was fouled with 0.1 left in overtime, sinking the game-winning free throw (he finished with a career-high 33 points).

Houston remains the three seed, but they are just half-a-game up on four seed Portland. Houston needs some more wins to make sure they don’t slide down the standings (and into the Warriors side of the bracket).

3) Toronto beats slumping Oklahoma City in overtime. It was the night Oklahoma City celebrated Nick Collison, retiring the jersey the ultimate glue guy who put the franchise first.

The Thunder could use a guy like that right now.

Since the All-Star break, the Thunder are now 5-10 with the worst offense in the NBA over that stretch (104.6 offensive net rating). That was on display Wednesday in a loss to Toronto, where the Thunder had a 100.9 offensive rating.

Toronto led most of the way and was in control, complete with Kawhi Leonard seeming annoyed by Paul George‘s defense.

At home in OKC you knew it was coming — Thunder made a run and ultimately tied the game with 4.8 seconds to go on a driving Russell Westbrook layup.

It forced overtime, but there Paul George fouled out, the Raptors scored nine in a row, and that was the ballgame.

With the loss, the Thunder fell into a three-way tie with the Spurs and Clippers for the 6/7/8 seeds in the West, with OKC technically being the eight seed based on tiebreakers. That would mean Golden State in the first round, the worst possible outcome for Oklahoma City. There are 10 games left in the Thunder season and they need to find wins fast or it could be a quick postseason for a team that just a couple of months ago was talked about as potentially the second best team out West.

Marcus Smart shoves down Joel Embiid from behind, gets ejected (video)

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Marcus Smart recently bemoaned the lack of physicality in the NBA.

After Joel Embiid dropped his shoulder into him on a screen, Smart brought some to tonight’s Celtics-76ers game.

Smart shoved Embiid in the back, sending the center to the floor. A cheap shot? Yes. Embiid wasn’t looking. But Smart would surely argue Embiid started it. I also doubt Smart intended to push Embiid from behind. Smart just wanted to get at Embiid as quickly as possible, and Embiid happened to be facing the other way when Smart arrived.

Smart got a flagrant 2 and the accompanying ejection. Embiid received a technical foul.

Danny Ainge: Brad Stevens deserves least blame ‘by far’ for Celtics’ problems

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The Celtics are reeling. They’ve gone 1-5 since the All-Star break and face chemistry issues.

How much blame does Boston coach Brad Stevens deserve for the team’s struggles?

Celtics president Danny Ainge on 98.5 The Sports Hub, as transcribed by Darren Hartwell of NBC Sports Boston:

“There’s blame to share for everybody, but I will say this: He’s the least, by far, of anybody that there is to blame,” Ainge said of Stevens.

“Because I know that Brad is going to be prepared, and I know that Brad is putting in the work to do whatever he can to try to help this team and fix this team. So, that is the very bottom of the rung.”

“I know that he takes more responsibility than anybody, in my opinion, as to the success and lack of success,” Ainge added. “He takes ownership in the things he needs to do better.

“Anyway, he’s the least of all the problems that we have on our team right now.”

Ainge could have easily left it at, “There’s blame to share for everybody.” His strong support for Stevens seems like a message to Celtics players to get in line behind the coach.

I wonder how that goes over in the locker room.

Stevens remains a highly respected coach. He did an excellent job in Boston the previous four years.

But, at Butler and with the Celtics previously, he has largely succeeded by overachieving with moderate talent. He develops strong equalitarian-leaning game plans, communicates them well and gets his players to buy in.

The challenge in Boston this year is different.

The Celtics are loaded with at least theoretical talent. Kyrie Irving is a star. Gordon Hayward was a star before he got hurt. Jayson Tatum, Jaylen Brown and Terry Rozier played big roles on a team that reached the conference finals without Irving and Hayward last year then have had to take backseats this year. Al Horford and Marcus Smart can’t be ignored, and the way he played until lately, neither could Marcus Morris.

Irving’s leadership has been turbulent. His impending free agency casts a cloud over everything. Rozier and Morris are also in contract years.

It’s a lot for a coach to manage. Stevens not totally flourishing in this situation is not necessarily an indictment of him. This is new ground for him, and he can learn on the job.

But it does seem Stevens must coach better for Boston to realize its potential.