LeBron James’ 25 lead Lakers past Kings 101-86, moves L.A. to .500

3 Comments

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — LeBron James scored 25 points and recently signed Tyson Chandler had 12 rebounds as the Los Angeles Lakers beat the Sacramento Kings 101-86 Saturday night.

The Lakers, who began the season with three straight losses, moved to .500 (6-6) for the first time this season by holding the Kings, who entered the game averaging 118 points per contest, to their lowest scoring total of the season.

It was only the second time Sacramento has been held below 100 points this season, and it marked the first time Los Angeles had held an opponent below 100.

James hit three 3-pointers and had seven rebounds. He only had two assists, though he often fed teammates for open shots that missed – including Lonzo Ball, who was 2 for 10 from the field.

Chandler, playing in his second game with the Lakers, logged 23 minutes and scored three points. Los Angeles has won four of its last five.

De'Aaron Fox had 17 of his 21 points in the first half to lead the Kings, who shot 35 percent from the field and went 6-for-25 on 3-pointers.

The Lakers were ahead by six points at the half and held a 76-65 lead entering the fourth quarter. They built that lead to 20 points at 88-68 before the Kings responded with a 10-0 run, but Sacramento got no closer.

 

Tyson Chandler clears waivers, signs with Lakers

Getty Images
2 Comments

When JaVale McGee is on the court, the Lakers are 6.3 points per 100 possessions better on defense. Or, look at it this way: When he is on the court the Lakers have allowed 105.3 points per 100 possessions, which would be fifth in the NBA.

But then he has to sit. The Lakers’ most used non-McGee lineup — Lonzo Ball, Josh Hart, LeBron James, Lance Stephenson, Kyle Kuzma – gets outscored by 24.6 points per 100. When McGee is out, the Lakers are a bottom 10 defense.

Which is why the gamble on Tyson Chandler makes sense for them. Chandler may not have much left in the tank, we shall see, but the Lakers need to do something.

Chandler cleared waivers, as first reported by Chris Haynes of Yahoo Sports.

Then, as expected, he signed with the Lakers.

His contract with the Lakers is for the veteran minimum of $2.1 million — which not-so-coincidentally is how much of a discount he gave Phoenix off the $13.5 million they owed him this season.

Chandler is a big body, a guy who can call out coverages, gets rebounds, and on a veteran team may be able to stake out a role as a backup big off the bench who helps the interior defense. Or maybe not — the past two seasons the Suns’ defense was not appreciably better when Chandler was in the game. Once a very active and mobile defender, at age 36 he is not that anymore, and the players going against him can either pop out off a pick or force a switch, either way he struggles to defend in space anymore. He certainly is not going to be able to run the floor like the Lakers prefer.

Maybe Chandler works out well for the role the Lakers need him. If not, this is a low-risk gamble and the Lakers can just move one. Come the buyout season next February there likely will be some quality big men (Robin Lopez‘s name comes to mind) who could be on the market.

Lakers’ coach Luke Walton: ‘I don’t feel like I am going anywhere’

Getty Images
6 Comments

Magic Johnson’s voice carries serious weight. The fact that he’s around the team only part-time and spends most of his hours on his other business ventures doesn’t matter (GM Rob Pelinka runs basketball operations day-to-day). Magic is the franchise icon, the guy his name at the top of the flowchart, the guy who sat down with LeBron James at midnight on July 1 and sealed the deal — what he says goes.

And he reportedly made it clear to Luke Walton that the Lakers’ slow start — 2-5 when Magic spoke to Walton, 3-5 now — is not what’s expected. Even though even Magic himself said a slow start should be expected.

How does Walton feel about all this? He’s a pretty chill guy.

It’s a little harder when the distraction comes from inside the organization, but the point is the same for Walton.

Most observers expected the Lakers to start a little slow, LeBron James and a host of other veterans were thrown in with a young team that won 35 games last season and were still trying to figure things out before the roster upheaval. That screams “adjustment period” to anyone sane. Brandon Ingram and Lonzo Ball, the two guys with the ball in their hands the most last season, are taking longer to figure out how to play with LeBron and the sacrifices involved. That should have been expected. That doesn’t excuse everything — for example the Lakers’ 23rd-ranked defense — but it does mean there needs to be patience.

Walton is likely safe for a while — owner Jeanie Buss brought him in and she’s in his corner. That’s a strong ally to have. If this team is still struggling when we all get serious about Christmas shopping (so, Dec. 24), then things will look and feel different. But right now it is too early, and Walton should just keep doing what he feels is best.

But he had to notice his seat just got a little warmer.

NBA Power Rankings: Warriors, undefeated Bucks top the list

Getty Images
Leave a comment

This early in the season there is still a lot of volatility in the rankings, with teams making big leaps (or big falls) as we start to figure out who they really are. We do know the Warriors are very, very good. Looks like the Bucks may be, too.

 
Warriors small icon 1. Warriors (7-1, last week No 3). Golden State’s offense has been incendiary to start the season — Stephen Curry had a 51-point game and is aggressively hunting his shot again, Kevin Durant knows he can score from anywhere at any time, and then Monday Klay Thompson unleashed 14 threes on the poor Bulls. The Warriors are scoring at a 120 points per 100 possessions pace, more than 5 points better than anyone else in the NBA this season and more than 7 better than they were last season. And it feels like they can sustain this.

Bucks small icon 2. Bucks (7-0, LW 4). The NBA’s last undefeated team, the Bucks haven’t just won games they have dominated — Milwaukee has led by at least 16 points in every game this season. While coach Mike Budenholzer gets (and deserves) credit for opening up the offense, the real key is the Bucks have the second-best defense in the league (Boston) and is one of only two teams allowing less than a point per possession this season. The Bucks are playing a simpler, easier to understand system and are thriving in it. Great test Thursday night against those Celtics (on TNT).

 
Raptors small icon 3. Raptors (7-1, LW. 1). Tuesday night Kawhi Leonard showed what he means to this team — he smothered Ben Simmons and was a key reason the Sixers’ star had 11 turnovers on the night. Oh, and Leonard had 31 points in the game, too. It’s too early to use these words in any meaningful way, but Leonard has played at an MVP level to open the season. After a home-heavy schedule to start, the Raptors have 8-of-11 on the road starting Friday in Phoenix.

 
Nuggets small icon 4. Nuggets (5-1, LW 2).. Denver’s offense still has not found it’s groove to start the season, specifically the team is taking 28.7 threes a game (25th in the league) and is shooting 29.7% on those so far (for comparison, the team took 30.9 threes a game last season and it 37.1%). Gary Harris is shooting 26.9% so far but that will improve. The Nuggets’ defense has slipped a little but is still third rated in the NBA and is covering for the offense until that train gets rolling. Good home tests Saturday and Monday with Utah and Boston.

 
Blazers small icon 5. Trail Blazers (5-2, LW 7). Damian Lillard finished fourth in the MVP voting last season and is coming out playing even better this season: 29.6 points per game, shooting 37.7 percent from three, with a 65.9 true shooting percentage and a 30.6 PER, every one of those a career best. So far 71 percent of his shots are threes or at the rim. It’s stunning. Lillard led the Blazers to a 3-1 record on a recent road trip with some quality wins (Indiana, Houston, if Houston is still a quality win) and now the Blazers are home for six in a row.

 
Celtics small icon 6. Celtics (5-2, LW 9). After a rough start to the season on offense the Celtics are starting to find their groove, including scoring 217 points in a home-and-home sweep of the Pistons. Kyrie Irving found himself in that second Pistons win, scoring 31 on 16 shots, before that the offense has leaned on Marcus Morris. Yes, Marcus Morris — and he’s been up to the task off the bench. Saturday starts a tough five game road trip for the Celtics.

 
Jazz small icon 7. Jazz (4-2, LW 14). Good to see Grayson Allen find a groove against Dallas, 11 points and a +17 when forced into a larger role. Donovan Mitchell has stopped pressing and the Utah offense is starting to fall into place during a three-game win streak on the road (the Jazz are an impressive 4-0 on the road to start the season). Utah’s offense is two points per 100 possessions better this season than last (so far) and improvement on that end is the key to taking the next step forward for this team. Fun Rudy Gobert vs. Karl-Anthony Towns showdown on Wednesday night.

 
Pelicans small icon 8. Pelicans (4-2, LW 5). Two losses in a row for the Pelicans but both without Anthony Davis (elbow) so we’re not going to read much into that. The starting lineup is still a beast when Davis is healthy, outscoring teams by 34.4 points per 100 (and the elbow thing isn’t serious). The loss in Denver was the start of a five-game road trip against potential West playoff teams, a road trip where the Pelicans could use to get Davis back and make a showing because, while it’s early, in the ridiculously deep West these are the games that will matter in the end.

 
Pacers small icon 9. Pacers (4-3, LW 8). While the Pacers are 4-3 to start the season, they are outscoring teams by 6.3 points per 100 possessions, which is sixth best in the league (that per-possessions data suggests they should be at least 5-2). The big key for the Pacers is their shooting, they have hit a league-best 43 percent of their shots from three — but they take the league’s fewest shots from three, 22.6 per game. Victor Oladipo has found a groove and is back to being his old self, and with that the Pacers are showing last season was not some one-off fluke. Now we’ll see if they can take a step forward off it.

Pistons small icon 10. Pistons (4-2, 6). Boston’s defense made Blake Griffin look human again in a home-and-home, and the search for quality shooting and shot creators around him continues. All those wins count, but the Pistons have put together this quality start while having a -1.3 net rating, something that could catch up to them (or, they could swing their rating around) with 6-of-9 coming up on the road, almost all against other teams in the East.

 
Clippers small icon 11. Clippers (4-3, LW 12). The Clippers’ primary bench units are both destroying teams and are just a lot of fun to watch: Lou Williams, Mike Scott, Montrezl Harrell, and Shai Gilgeous-Alexander are killing it with either Milos Teodosic (+23.2 per 100) or Luc Mbah a Moute (+19.2 per 100) as the fifth man. Those bench units get out and run and Milos is just a walking basketball highlight show.

 
Spurs small icon 12. Spurs (4-2, LW 10). San Antonio is off to a quick start but has a net rating of -3.5 per 100 possessions to start the season — either their record or that rating will correct itself. San Antonio is the second-best three-point shooting team in the league percentage wise, hitting 41.3 percent from deep this season, but with a team full of guys who like the midrange they are taking just 23 shots from three a game, third lowest in the league. What the Spurs are doing well is taking care of the ball, turning the ball over on a league-best 11.4 percent of their possessions.

 
Grizzlies small icon 13. Grizzlies (4-2, LW 17). Memphis is back to the formula we have seen for years: An elite defense that keeps them in games (fourth best in the NBA), which covers up for a bottom 10 offense. In the past that has worked well enough to keep them on the fringes of the playoff race and have a couple of good runs — when everyone stays healthy. Jaren Jackson Jr. update, the rookie is averaging 11.5 points a game on 46.3 percent shooting, with 5.2 rebounds a night and a PER of 16.7. He’s impressing.

 
Hornets small icon 14. Hornets (4-4, LW 16). New coach, same problem in Charlotte: The Hornets are outscoring teams by 6.1 points per 100 possessions, but have a .500 record (when they should be 5-3) because they keep losing close games. The Hornets have lost by two to the Sixers, two to the Bulls, and one to the Bucks — three losses by a total of five points. Kemba Walker continues to tear up the NBA, averaging 30.1 points and six assists per night, shooting 41.4 percent from three with a PER of 28.3.

 
Sixers small icon 15. 76ers (4-4, LW 11). The 76ers are taking a lot of threes, 35.9 a game (fifth most in the NBA), but they are hitting just 33.8% of them so far. Robert Covington (42.9%) and J.J. Redick (39%) are pulling their weight, but Dario Saric (23.4% on 5.9 attempts per game), Joel Embiid (29.4% on 4.3 attempts) and Markelle Fultz (30.8% but just 1.6 attempts) are building a brick house right now. When Fultz, Embiid, and non-threat from three Ben Simmons are on the floor together the Sixers are -14.2 per 100 possessions so far. The starting lineup with Fultz continues to struggle mightily on both ends of the court.

 
Kings small icon 16. Kings (5-3, LW 25). I may have this team ranked too low — the Kings are playing good basketball right now, having won four in a row including a couple games on the road in Florida. De’Aaron Fox has been a second-season revelation, Willie Cauley-Stein is going to get paid like he wants if he keeps playing like this, and Buddy Hield is averaging 18.9 points per game shooting 44.7 percent from three. They have the point differential of a .500 team, so maybe this catches up with them a little, but the Kings are playing hard and much better than anyone expected.

 
Heat small icon 17. Heat (3-4, LW 21). Hassan Whiteside has been critical for the Heat on both ends of the floor this season and the team has been 16.1 points per 100 possessions better when he is on the court rather than sitting. We’ll see if he can keep it up as the season moves along (consistency has been an issue) but the start has been strong. That said, if your counting, Whiteside has yet to rack up a single assist this season.

 
18. Timberwolves (3-4, LW 13). Jimmy Butler has upped his distraction ante, deciding to sit out Wednesday’s game in protest of not getting traded yet (I love that the team is calling it “general soreness”). Those trade talks are heating up again, but nothing is imminent and the entire situation continues to be a cloud over this team. It is part of the reason they are inconsistent. Until the Butler situation gets resolved, fans will not know what they will get from this team night to night (and gamblers may want to stay away for the same reason).

 
Thunder small icon 19. Thunder (2-4, LW 22).. The Thunder have won a couple games in a row (Clippers and Suns), with Russell Westbrook and Paul George having a matching 55 points each across the two games. The Oklahoma City defense is also starting to come around, it’s sixth best in the NBA as of Wednesday. The second half against the Clippers was the model of what the Thunder want to be this season, Westbrook and George were playing with pace and running an entertaining offense while the defense got enough stops. Can they build off that is the question?

 
Mavericks small icon 20. Mavericks (2-5, LW 18). Talking to a scout about the Mavericks yielded a couple of impressions: Luka Doncic runs hot and cold as a rookie but there is a lot to like. What impressed more is how well DeAndre Jordan passes out of the high post (he had 9 assists in a loss to Utah). Jordan seems to really enjoy being put in a new role, asked to do things the Clippers did not (they had Chris Paul and Blake Griffin, you’re not making DJ a playmaker when you have those two). Plus, DJ shooting better than 80% from the free throw line makes him far more dangerous.

 
Lakers small icon 21. Lakers (2-5, LW 23). It’s early, but how are things going so far with LeBron James and the young core? When LeBron and Kyle Kuzma are on the court together, the Lakers have a net rating of -0.8 (per 100 possessions), basically playing teams even. LeBron and Josh Hart have a +1.5 rating together. LeBron and Lonzo Ball are -5.3 per 100. LeBron and Brandon Ingram are -6.2 per 100 — and that’s troubling because that’s the one the Lakers really need to work out.

 
Rockets small icon 22. Rockets (1-5, LW 15). Mike D’Antoni threatened to move away from the all-switching defense the Rockets used last season. However, he didn’t when he looked at the film and saw the numbers because the switches have not been the problem. The bigger problem in Tuesday’s loss to a tired Portland team was heart: When the Blazers made a second quarter run you could see the “here we go again” reaction from the Rockets and they folded. The Rockets are already five games back of the Warriors, and now Houston heads out on the road for 6-of-7. Then they come home to the Warriors.

 
Knicks small icon 23. Knicks (2-5, LW 24). Knicks fans got to dream of Kevin Durant last week (and they should soon start watching Duke games and dreaming of drafting that talent), but the Knicks themselves are playing a little better than their record indicates. Eyes Kanter is not happy coming off the bench, but the way Kris Middleton went at him and abused him in the pick-and-roll for the Bucks is a reminder of why Kanter is nice in the regular season but is hard to play in the playoffs.

 
Nets small icon 24. Nets (2-5, LW 28). Three straight losses, and while its easy to forgive the ones to the Warriors and the Pelicans, the Knicks handling handling them this week was a reminder of where this team really is. Still, there are positives: Jarrett Allen has evolved into a flat out beast of a rim protector (except against Noah Vonleh, somehow) and Caris LeVert continues to turn heads around the league.

 
Hawks small icon 25. Hawks (2-5, LW 26). While fans are tuning in to see Trae Young — who has good numbers but is up and down, as rookies tend to be — it is Taurean Prince that should be turning heads. In his third season he is averaging 16.7 points per game, and while his efficiency could be better he has become someone who can be a solid role player on a good team (but has to do more for the Hawks).

 
Magic small icon 26. Magic (2-5, LW 19). There is only one team in the entire NBA scoring an average of less than one point per possession — and you guessed it, it’s Orlando. There are guys who can score on this team, but Nikola Vucevic has never been known as someone consistent, and Aaron Gordon is shooting a little less than he did a season ago but otherwise his numbers are just in line with before.

 
Bulls small icon 27. Bulls (2-5, LW 29).. If one player this season is making pundits and reporters eat crow, it’s Zach LaVine. Almost everyone (*raises hand*) ripped the $78 million offer sheet the Kings gave him, then were dumbfounded the Bulls matched. Yet through seven games he’s averaged 28.1 points per game, shot 38.6% from three, and has a PER of 22.7. He can’t defend, but if he can keep scoring like that it more than makes up for it — and makes that a not insane contract the Bulls agreed to.

 
Wizards small icon 28. Wizards (1-6, LW 20). Having watched this team in person, it’s hard to describe how bad things are for Washington. It’s not just the Xs and Os stuff — although they sluff their way through cuts and play half-hearted without the ball, especially John Wall — but its the chemistry issues. Bradley Beal gets knocked down going to the rim and no Wizard comes over to help him up so Tobias Harris has to. There are almost no high fives around the team pregame. Otto Porter might as well be on an island. Scott Brooks may find his seat getting hot, but the problems run well beyond what a coach can fix.

 
Suns small icon 29. Suns (1-5, LW 27). Phoenix has the worst net rating in the NBA, with the third-worst defense and the sixth worst offense. Not picking up the fourth-year option on Dragan Bender was both the right move and a purging of the sins of the past administration. On the bright side, one move by the last GM looks good — Deandre Ayton is averaging 17.5 point and 10.3 rebounds a game, shooting 64.4 percent. He’s still learning how to defend, but he looks like he could be the franchise anchor the Suns were counting on.

 
Cavaliers small icon 30. Cavaliers (1-6, LW 30). Cleveland finally got a win, knocking off the Atlanta Hawks Tuesday. However, if you don’t have a coach — they fired Tyronn Lue over the weekend and Larry Drew has refused to take on the interim title without a healthy pay raise or some security — you don’t move to get out of the bottom of the rankings.

Lonzo Ball says he needs to “get engaged, more energy” on court

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Lonzo Ball has not yet found a rhythm playing with LeBron James — in the 145 minutes those two have been on the court this season (small sample size alert) the Lakers are getting outscored by 5.3 points per 100 possessions. Ball should provide defense, shooting, and a secondary ball handler who will push the pace with LeBron, but just like so many players before him Ball is finding the sacrifices and challenges of playing with LeBron a big adjustment some nights.

Like against the Timberwolves Monday, when he finished with just four points, one assist, and one rebound. When his offensive game wasn’t going early, Ball did not work hard on cuts off the ball, didn’t bring energy at either end, and just kind of floated through the game.

Tuesday Ball admitted he needs to do better, via Ohm Youngmisuk of ESPN.

“I just got to rebound the ball, get engaged, more energy, just do what I can to get myself going,” Ball said Tuesday.

“Just not doing my job,” Ball said.

Ball did miss most of training camp recovering from left meniscus surgery, and while he won’t admit it that is part of what is happening.

But part of it is adjusting to playing with LeBron is hard, especially for a guy who likes to be a playmaker with the ball in his hands. Just ask Kyrie Irving or Dwyane Wade or Kevin Love or Chris Bosh or a host of other guys who have been in these shoes. Players have to learn how to sacrifice and adjust, and that is far more mental than physical. Lonzo played off the ball a lot and very effectively at UCLA, he has the skill set and the game, but it’s different.

 

Brandon Ingram is having the same issue (although he had 24 points Monday). Kyle Kuzma and Josh Hart, who play more as finishers, have adjusted more quickly. It’s all going to be a sink-or-swim process with the Lakers and it’s far too early to make any calls (except for Hart, he’s a keeper). Ball is just struggling more publicly with it all right now.