Langston Galloway

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Sixers reportedly interested in trade for Pistons’ Luke Kennard, Langston Galloway

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Philadelphia is aggressive heading into the trade deadline, looking anywhere and everywhere for shooting and playmakers to spark their middle-of-the-pack offense. The Sixers have been linked to numerous players: Robert Covington, Malik Beasley, Davis Bertans, E’Twaun Moore, and Andre Iguodala.

Now add Detroit’s Luke Kennard and Langston Galloway, and free agent Jeff Green to the mix. From by Keith Pompey of the Philadephia Inquirer:

Add those names to the list of wing players the Sixers have expressed interest in acquiring in a trade and/or free agent signees, according to multiple league sources. One source confirmed that Green worked for the Sixers in Miami while the team was there to face the Heat a couple of weeks ago…

League sources believe any Sixers’ trade deal will almost certainly include the team parting ways with second-year guard Zhaire Smith.

It’s going to take more than Smith, an athletic two guard with some promise but who has been pedestrian for Delaware in the G-League this season — to get a deal done. He is a throw-in with a package for one of those players.

Kennard and Galloway would bring the kind of shooting the Sixers need.

Galloway is a very good catch-and-shoot guy from three – 5.1 a game this season, shooting 40.7 percent on them. Kennard is shooting 39.9 percent from three on 6.5 attempts a game this season. Both fit with the Sixers’ inside-out style of play and both would come off the bench and, along with Furkan Korkmaz, give Philly some floor spacing. Kennard would cost more to get in a trade.

Green is a fallback option. Utah released Green — to get more run for Georges Niang — but he averaged 7.8 points a game while shooting 32.7% on threes for them.

Detroit, with Blake Griffin likely out for the season, is open for business at the trade deadline. Andre Drummond is available and has multiple teams interested in acquiring his skills. Other players, including Derrick Rose, could draw interest.

Philadelphia has the 15th-ranked offense in the NBA. Joel Embiid is a beast around the basket, and Ben Simmons has taken just 17 shots outside the paint all season long (and two of those where end-of-quarter heaves from beyond halfcourt). That’s led to a clogged paint and some spacing issues. Philly heads into the trade deadline needing shooters and maybe a more traditional point guard to run the show at times. Whether they have the players and picks to make a trade happen is another question, but GM Elton Brand is being aggressive.

 

Watch Derrick Rose’s game winner, Pistons beat Pelicans 105-103

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NEW ORLEANS — Derrick Rose is 31 and his body has taken a beating, but the 2011 NBA MVP showed once again he can still take over a game and knock down the decisive shot.

Rose hit a 14-foot jumper in the lane with 0.3 seconds left and scored 17 of his team-high 21 points in the fourth quarter to lift the Detroit Pistons over the skidding New Orleans Pelicans 105-103 on Monday night.

It was Rose’s second consecutive strong fourth-quarter performance for the Pistons, who have won four of five. New Orleans lost its ninth straight.

“I don’t talk or boast or brag about it, but I still have goals,” said Rose, who has endured a series of physical setbacks, including an ACL tear, that have resulted in him playing for five teams over the past five years.

“I know overall where I’m at as a player and as a person, and I believe in myself,” Rose added. “That’s where it all starts – with me believing in myself – and going to an organization and playing for a team that believes in me, too. I believe this is the start.”

With the game tied at 103, Detroit worked an isolation play for Rose, who dribbled the ball out top against Jrue Holiday, one of the best defenders in the league.

Rose drove into the lane, spun to the right and hit his jumper over Holiday’s outstretched arms.

“He has everything,” Holiday said. “I think it was a good play on his part. I’m not going to take anything from him. He’s a great player and the shot that he made was a tough shot. There was nothing I could do about it.”

Pistons coach Dwane Casey said Rose is not completely recovered from a strained right hamstring that forced him to miss five games last month. But his leg must be improving. In a 108-101 victory over Indiana on Saturday, Rose had 10 fourth-quarter points – including four in the final 1:14 and a floater in the lane with 18.4 seconds left that iced the game.

“This man has done it,” Casey said. “His timing and his rhythm – I still don’t think he’s back 100%, but it’s coming. We’ve just got to make sure we play high IQ basketball.”

Rose went 7 of 8 from the field and drained both 3-point attempts during his fourth-quarter flurry.

After his go-ahead basket, New Orleans inbounded the ball from halfcourt toward Jaxson Hayes, but the rookie center could not get the tying tip-in.

Brandon Ingram‘s 18-foot turnaround gave New Orleans a 103-101 lead with 1:11 to go, but Rose hit a spinning layup to tie it at 103 with 38.7 seconds remaining. Ingram then missed a tough-angle jumper from the left baseline over Blake Griffin, who switched over to guard him in the final 90 seconds.

Ingram led the Pelicans with 31 points but scored only four in the fourth quarter.

“We knew Blake couldn’t guard Ingram for long periods of time, but for one possession or two possessions, we wanted him to use his physicality (on Ingram), and he used it,” Casey said. “He did a great job on him.”

Detroit had three players in double figures besides Rose: Langston Galloway (16 points), Luke Kennard (14) and Andre Drummond (13). Drummond also grabbed 10 rebounds.

The Pelicans missed their first 10 3-point attempts in the third quarter and Detroit erased a six-point deficit to take a 67-61 lead.

 

Watch Malik Monk drain game winning three-pointer at buzzer, Hornets beat Pistons

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Things haven’t always gone the way Malik Monk hoped during his first two seasons with the Charlotte Hornets.

But coach James Borrego said the third-year shooting guard never stopped working – and now he’s starting to see some big results.

Monk knocked down a contested 3-pointer at the buzzer to give the Charlotte Hornets a 109-106 victory over the Detroit Pistons on Friday night, helping snap a four-game losing streak.

“Every game is getting better and better, so hopefully I just keep going up,” said Monk, who finished with 19 points on 8-of-12 shooting. “I’ve been working hard for these two or three years and I’ve been waiting for my moment.”

It came after Pistons point guard Derrick Rose drove the lane and threw the ball away with a second left. Monk, who was the third option on the inbounds play from midcourt, came flying around a screen, caught the pass from Cody Martin and buried the jumper with a smooth stroke over the outstretched arm of Andre Drummond.

Langston Galloway had a career-high 32 points on seven 3-pointers for Detroit, and Drummond added 16 points and 20 rebounds.

The Pistons have lost four straight.

 

Ten best players not taken in 2019 NBA Draft

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Fred VanVleet hounded Stephen Curry in the NBA Finals, hit big shots, and played an important role in the Toronto Raptors winning their first ever NBA title.

VanVleet was undrafted.

So was his teammate Jeremy Lin. And the Warriors’ Quinn Cook. Then there’s Seth Curry, Robert Covington, Kent Bazemore, Joe Ingles, Yogi Ferrell, Allonzo Trier, Jonathon Simmons, Langston Galloway, Matthew Dellavedova, Royce O'Neale, Maxi Kleber… and that’s just the tip of the iceberg of undrafted players making an impact in the NBA.

Who are the guys overlooked in the 2019 NBA Draft that teams may regret not snapping up? Here are our top 10:

Luguentz Dort, 6’4” shooting guard, Arizona State. He was the Pac 12 Freshman of the Year and his value at the next level is as a defender, he was tenacious as an on-ball guy (although not every scout is so sure about that). Some people thought he was a late first-round pick. What scared teams off? He’s a shooting guard who shot 30.7 percent from three last year. That has to improve (and reportedly has in workouts). OKC quickly locked him up after the draft.

He also has to become a better finisher at the rim, he was inconsistent there. But with his potential, it’s a surprise to see him go undrafted.

Naz Reid, 6’10” center, LSU. He has a world of potential, and while he’s a project big man, there were a lot of project bigs taken in this draft. Minnesota locked him up after the draft.

Reid can put the ball on the floor, shot better than 35 percent from three, has a good touch, and is the kind of big who could grab the board and bring the ball up himself. However, he seemed disinterested in defense (and occasionally offense) this season. Does he love basketball? That may have been the biggest reason he fell, but he has a chance to prove guys wrong.

Brian Bowen, 6’7″ wing, Sydney Kings. It didn’t take long after the draft for the Indiana Pacers to lock Bowen up.

Rather than play in college, Bowen went to Australia and played against men (and alongside Andrew Bogut). He’s got an NBA shooting touch, more confidence now, and knows how to play a physical game. It’s a surprise a team didn’t give him a shot before the Pacers.

Shamorie Ponds, 6’1” point guard, St. Johns. He’s got a lot of playground in his game, both for good and bad. He’s got impressive handles and uses that and some hesitation moves to get space and get to the rim or pull up for a jumper. After that, he’s got work to do. He has to get stronger, he has to be better at setting up teammates, his shot needs to be more consistent, and his defense needs to improve. A project, but if he puts in the work he could be a rotation guard in a few years.

DaQuan Jeffries, 6’5” wing, Tulsa. He has the raw tools to be a 3&D role player in the NBA — he’s very athletic, shooting range, he has a 7-foot wingspan — but it’s going to take a lot of development to get him there. Orlando is going to give him that chance.

Jeffries’ ball handling has to improve, and he has to be far more consistent. He had a good showing at the Portsmouth Invitational, which helped boost his draft stock, but just not enough.

Jontay Porter, 6’11” center, Missouri. The concern here is obvious — he has two ACL tears. He wasn’t the most athletic prospect to begin with, but the medical reports are the reason he fell out of the draft. Porter has skills as a shooter out to the arc and he plays a high IQ game, plus he fights hard for rebounds and tries on defense. Some team should bring him in this summer and give him a chance.

Terence Davis, 6’5” shooting guard, Mississippi. A guy who has moved up draft boards as the day got closer, but apparently not enough. He a good athlete he has been a decent shooter, if a bit streaky, but if he can become a more consistent shooter and add a little playmaking to his game, Davis can be a role player in the NBA. He’s got to improve his defense and accept a role, but if he can do that he can develop into a scorer off the bench in the league.

Louis King, 6’8” forward, Oregon. Teams see the potential for a stretch four in him, he shot 38.6% from three last season, but he’s just got to get stronger. He’s not quick enough to be a very switchable defender. That said, he can become a role player if he puts in the work — and that’s the big question. Reports have teams concerned about his work ethic and love of the game, and that likely doomed his chances. He has to repair that this summer.

Jalen Lecque, 6’4” guard, Brewster Academy. This is all about the potential. Lecque played last season at a prep school, not in college, he’s a top-shelf athlete with NBA wingspan (6’8.5”) who could be an impressive NBA defender. That’s why the Suns gave him a non-guaranteed contract.

Lecque is very, very raw, his shot isn’t there yet, the game seemed to move too fast for him at the Draft Combine, and there is a lot of development to do here. Still, gambling on a guy with athletic upside is a smart play.

Zach Norvell Jr., 6’5″ shooting guard, Gonzaga. In a league that needs shooting, Norvell can get red-hot and has ridiculous range. Yes, there were questions about his athleticism, and with that who he could defend, but considering who was taken it’s surprising to see a good shooter left on the sidelines.

• One Bonus note: Teams were not nearly as high on Tacko Falls as fans. Maybe he proves everybody wrong and pans out, but he has no range to his game. He’s an old-school style center in a league getting away from those kinds of players, and teams were concerned he cannot keep up with the pace of the NBA. This isn’t college where he can just be planted near the rim, plus he needs to get a lot stronger to compete inside in the NBA. He’ll get a Summer League invite, no doubt, but he has a lot of work to do to get where he wants to be.

Report: Bucks trading Tony Snell, No. 30 pick to Pistons

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For a team only lukewarm on paying the luxury tax, the Bucks are in a payroll crunch. Khris Middleton, Brook Lopez, Malcolm Brogdon and Nikola Mirotic will be free agents this summer.

That’s why Milwaukee was trying to unload Tony Snell or Ersan Ilyasova.

But if they re-sign their key free agents to multi-year deals, the Bucks could face more payroll/tax concerns in 2020-21.

That’s why Milwaukee is willing to deal Snell and its first-round pick for Jon Leuer‘s burdensome contract – which carries a slightly lower salary than Snell’s next season ($9,508,043 vs. $11,592,857) and, more importantly, ends one year before Snell’s ($12,378,571 player option for 2020-21),

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

This trade lowers Milwaukee’s team salary by about $4 million next season and $14 million the following season.

The Bucks could stretch Leuer and reduce team salary by an extra $6,338,695 next season. But that’d also lock in a cap hit of $3,169,348 each of the next three years.

Milwaukee can make that decision later in the summer. It’ll depend what other free agents – especially Lopez, who has only Non-Bird Rights (technically a form of Bird Rights – command. Clearing extra money this offseason could be useful in multiple scenarios.

If Lopez signs for the non-taxpayer mid-level exception (which projects to start at about $9 million), the Bucks could maintain Bird Rights for Middleton, Brogdon and Mirotic then exceed the cap to re-sign those three. But Milwaukee would be hard-capped at a projected $138 million. Stretching Leuer could help the Bucks stay under that line.

If re-signing Lopez requires more than the mid-level exception, Milwaukee could open about $14 million in cap space by waiving George Hill and renouncing all its free agents besides Middleton and Brogdon. Stretching Leuer would open even more cap room to spend on Lopez.

If Lopez leaves, the same math applies to an outside free agent who could get the mid-level exception or cap room.

This extra maneuverability comes at a cost, though a reasonable one.

Snell, who fell from the Bucks’ rotation, could be the Pistons’ starting small forward next season. Detroit was desperate for wing depth. Though Snell isn’t the biggest wing, he adds size to a group comprised of Luke Kennard, Bruce Brown and Langston Galloway.

The No. 30 pick is a helpful piece to the Pistons, who also have the No. 15 pick in tomorrow’s draft. But this is a weak-looking draft that thins considerably before the end of the first round.

Milwaukee also had to take Leuer, who has been ineffective for years.

Detroit gets helps now with Snell and potentially later with the No. 30 pick. In between, that extra year of Snell’s contract looks burdensome.

The Bucks are just happy to have it not be theirs.