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Kawhi Leonard is returning to his vintage form, which means ignoring all the talk around him

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LOS ANGELES — There is a lot of noise around Kawhi Leonard, and it’s not just Kyle Lowry playing music and rapping along in the locker room pregame while his teammates try to ignore him. Although there’s that, too.

It’s noise from outside the locker room, speculation and constant chatter about Leonard and his plans as a free agent next summer: Is Leonard still leaning toward coming to Los Angeles? Lakers or Clippers? Or New York? Or somewhere else? Is he happy in Toronto and thinking of staying? Can he handle the weather in Toronto? Is he fully healthy?

This chatter fills sports talk radio shows, Twitter debates, message boards and more.

The noise also ramps up when Leonard goes to places he has been linked, such as Los Angeles.

“I focus on what we’re doing,” Leonard said of his reaction to all the speculation prior to his Raptors knocking off the Clippers Tuesday night (without him due to a sore hip). “I don’t buy into reading media, don’t have no social media, so just focus on what’s in front of me. At that time it’s either my family or playing basketball.”

Does what is being said bother him?

“Not at all. I don’t watch TV too much,” Leonard said, adding he uses apps to watch movies and TV shows.

What Leonard is not doing is consuming NBA media.

However, the NBA world has obsessed over him in the past year.

Leonard forced his way out of San Antonio last offseason after the proper course of treatment for quadriceps tendinopathy (which sidelined Leonard all but nine games last season) became a wedge between him and the franchise. How much the people around and advisors Leonard helped drive in that wedge to grow the gap — to get Leonard out of San Antonio and to a larger market where he could be more of a star — is one of those topics of gossip and speculation. The Spurs are known as one of the most player-friendly organizations in the league.

Leonard got his wish, was traded to Toronto, and has looked like a top-five NBA player again this season, especially of late, shaking off the rust to average 26.1 points per game, shooting 38 percent from three, taking charge of the offense for stretches and locking down players on defense. If people forgot how good Leonard was last season, he’s reminding them — and helping lift the Raptors to a 22-7 record and the top spot in the East.

Yet everyone still has questions, and Leonard is not about to fill in the gaps in that knowledge, either.

For example, what does he think of the Raptors organization?

“It’s been good so far,” Leonard said of the fit in Toronto. “Like I said, we’ve been winning, everyone’s playing well. Can’t complain.”

Are the Raptors different than the Spurs as an organization?

“It’s still two goals and a basketball, just different teammates,” Leonard said.

What about Toronto as a city?

“It’s pretty hard to enjoy the city when you’re playing every other day,” Leonard said. “You usually take those off days to take some treatment and get your body ready for the next day. Just rest so you have the energy.”

Is the cold bothering the Southern California kid? That one he did answer.

“Just wear a jacket,” Leonard said. “We’re in a building. We’re not outside playing in the snow. And it’s good scenery.”

Leonard also confirmed that he’s not feeling the effects of that quadriceps injury last season and it isn’t slowing him down (the hip injury that had him out Tuesday in Los Angeles was separate, just the kind of bumps every player deals with over the course of a season).

“I was able to take my time and get the right treatment to make me feel comfortable, taking the right steps through training camp and throughout the season to have trust in myself,” Leonard said.

Will he be playing in back-to-backs soon?

“I’ve been playing a lot of minutes, we’ll just see as it goes on,” Leonard said. “It’s not that big a deal to play into a back-to-back.”

That’s all we get. No hints of his mindset or what he is planning for next summer. No deep thoughts on the organization or situation. He’s playing up the image that Gregg Popovich and the Spurs loved — a guy obsessed with the game who considers everything else a distraction.

That image isn’t completely accurate, either. Leonard is focused on his family as well. He has other interests. And you can be certain he has thoughts about what he does and does not want to do next July as a free agent.

He’s just not letting any of us in on it. Which is vintage Leonard.

NBA Power Rankings: Bucks move into top spot, finally healthy Warriors climbing fast

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The Bucks have had the best net rating in the league much of the year, they have the leading MVP candidate in Giannis Antetokounmpo, and now they have the top spot in these rankings. At least until the finally healthy Warriors really get rolling again.

 
Bucks small icon 1. Bucks (18-8, last week No. 5). Kawhi Leonard, who was matched up on Giannis Antetokounmpo in the showdown last week (that the Bucks won) was asked what has the Greek Freak done to step up his game this season: “He’s very aggressive. He got better knowing himself and who he’s playing with. He’s just more comfortable on the floor.” The transformation of the Bucks offense remains one of the most eye-popping things in the league, last season the Bucks took an average of 17.3 midrange shots per game, this season that is down to 6.2. The Bucks are 5-5 on the road this season, allowing 8 more points per game, and now they have 6-of-7 away from home.

 
Thunder small icon 2. Thunder (17-8, LW 3). Oklahoma City has won 5-of-6, and while they’ve done it against a soft part of the schedule with a scare (Brooklyn) and an ugly loss (Chicago) mixed in, their defense keeps them within striking distance of the top. The schedule gets tougher now, we’ll see how they fare (they did beat Utah Monday). Russell Westbrook is averaging a triple-double again — 22.1 points, 10.6 rebounds, and 10.2 assists per game — again, but his efficiency has slipped, he’s hitting just 21.8% from three and 61.8% on free throws (it was his efficiency when carrying a bigger offensive load that won him the MVP a couple years back).

 
Raptors small icon 3. Raptors (22-7, LW 2). How is Southern California guy Kawhi Leonard adapting to the cold of Toronto? “Just wear a jacket,” Leonard said Tuesday night. “We’re in a building. We’re not outside playing in the snow. And it’s good scenery.” Kyle Lowry snapped out of the worst shooting slump of his career Tuesday, shooting 8-of-13 and hitting some tough shots in a win over the Clippers (Lowry had shot 8-of-42 over his previous five games, 5-of-32 from three). Tuesday’s easy win over the Clippers starts a 4-game swing through the West and 7-of-9 on the road.

 
Warriors small icon 4. Warriors (19-9, LW 8). Stephen Curry returned to the lineup last week, Draymond Green was back on Monday, the Warriors have now won 4 in a row and are just percentage points out of the top spot in the Western Conference. For all the drama and hand-wringing about their internal squabbles, lack of depth, and questions about their health/wear and tear they are still right at the top of the West and now are poised to go on a run and remind everyone who the heavy favorite in the NBA is.

 
Sixers small icon 5. 76ers (19-9, LW 6). Joel Embiid may feel uncomfortable being asked to space the floor more since the arrival of Jimmy Butler (although he’s gotten more paint touches per game after the trade compared to before), but the big three is working: When Ben Simmons, Butler, and Embiid share the court the Sixers are +7.8 per 100. Add starters J.J. Redick and Wilson Chandler into that and the five-man starting unit for the Sixers is +12.4 per 100. Philly has won 6-of-7 behind them.

 
Nuggets small icon 6. Nuggets (18-9, LW 1).. Injuries are crushing this team right now: Paul Millsap will miss 3-4 weeks with a broken toe, then there’s Gary Harris (groin), Will Barton, and Isaiah Thomas (hip), and we haven’t even seen first-round pick Michael Porter Jr. (nor will we this season most likely). Things got so bad Denver signed Nick Young as an injury replacement. All the missing bodies led to losses in Charlotte and Atlanta last week, but this team has banked enough wins to stay afloat in the West, plus they still have Nikola Jokic.

 
Lakers small icon 7. Lakers (17-10, LW 9). The Lakers have an insanely good defensive net rating of 95.2 when Tyson Chandler is on the court this season, which is why the Lakers are +12.8 per 100 when Chandler is on the court this season. He was the defensive anchor they needed. Something to watch: How much the second unit suffers without Brandon Ingram (out for a couple of weeks with a sprained ankle), he was often the main shot creator with that unit (the Lakers were -15 Monday vs. Miami in the 10:29 LeBron was on the bench).

 
Celtics small icon 8. Celtics (16-10, LW 10). Winners of six in a row and they have outscored opponents by 25.6 per 100 in that stretch. Granted, a lot of that is against a soft part of the schedule (which continues for the next week) but it’s still confidence-boosting wins for a team that needs it. At the heart of Boston’s run is they are shooting the ball much better from three, 42.7% in those six games (the Celtics struggled to start the season from deep, shooting 32.8% from beyond the arc in October).

 
Pacers small icon 9. Pacers (17-10, LW 11). Indiana may get Victor Oladipo back soon, but they have impressed going 7-4 without him during this stretch with a +6.5 net rating in that time. Two things have keyed this run. First, the Pacers have the second best defense in the NBA over the last 11 games (allowing 101.7 points per 100 possessions). The second is the strong play of the Pacers’ bench, which has the second best net rating of any second unit in the NBA, +4.4 per 100.

 
Clippers small icon 10. Clippers (17-10, LW 4). Los Angeles has lost 3-of-4, including having the Raptors hand them their worst loss of the season Tuesday. The Clippers aren’t sneaking up on anyone anymore. “We aren’t the Clippers flying under the radar,” Patrick Beverley said after the latest loss. “People and teams understand our success and they are coming out ready. Not ready, actually, throwing the first punch.” The Clips need to punch back, their next nine games are against West teams in the playoff hunt.

 
Grizzlies small icon 11. Grizzlies (15-11, LW 12). Joakim Noah stepped right into the rotation in Memphis, playing almost 17 minutes a night off the bench, averaging 6.8 points and 4.3 rebounds a contest. Small sample size, but the Grizzlies’ defense has been slightly better with him on the court so far but the offense has taken a real hit in those minutes (there’s a lot of noise there, considering he’s out with the second unit on a team short of playmakers). They have gone 2-2 through a stretch of games against other teams in the West playoff hunt, and Monday’s game in Golden State starts a swing of four in a row away from home.

 
Mavericks small icon 12. Mavericks (14-11, LW 14). Dallas’ bench has the best net rating of any in the NBA, +4.5, and Rick Carlisle deserves a lot of credit for once again finding ways to make misfit pieces fit together and excel. This week brings the Luka Doncic revenge tour — he is going up against the teams that passed on him in the draft. It’s Atlanta Wednesday, Phoenix Thursday, and Sacramento Sunday. Those teams had better hope Doncic does not do to them what he did to the Houston Rockets, scoring 11 straight points to turn a likely loss into a win in the final minutes.

Pistons small icon 13. Pistons (13-12, 7). After spoiling Stephen Curry’s return and beating the Warriors, the Pistons have dropped five in a row. The problem is on the offensive end, where the injuries to Reggie Bullock, Stanley Johnson, and Ish Smith has hurt production and taken away key three-point shooters and floor spacing. With a heavy road schedule coming up, as well as some tough teams this week (Boston, Milwaukee), Detroit needs to find a way to stop the bleeding, knock down a few shots, and get a couple of wins before this starts to spiral.

 
Blazers small icon 14. Trail Blazers (15-12, LW 15). Portland has gone 3-7 in its last 10, with the only win against a +.500 team coming against Minnesota (a game where Jusuf Nurkic went off). Part of the problem in that stretch is their bench, which played well to start the season and but is struggling during this stretch, Houston’s bench outscored them 37-13 Tuesday night. Portland could use more scoring, which is why their name comes up in Carmelo Anthony rumors, but it’s hard to see how ‘Melo would fit in and help them much.

 
15. Timberwolves (13-14, LW 13). While Minnesota can rightfully point to a strong 9-5 record since trading away Jimmy Butler (a record sparked by the fifth best defense in the NBA in that stretch) they need to find a way to get some road wins in the brutal Western Conference — Minnesota is 0-9 against the West away from home after losses this week in Portland and Golden State. Games coming up this week on the road in Sacramento and Phoenix provide better chances for victories, but nothing is given in the West and those road losses could bite them at the end of the season.

 
Hornets small icon 16. Hornets (13-13, LW 21). Charlotte’s preferred starting lineup — Kemba Walker, Jeremy Lamb, Marvin Williams, Nicolas Batum, and Cody Zeller — is the most used five-man lineup in NBA, 311 total minutes together so far (just shy of 13 minutes a game). James Borego leans on that lineup because it’s outscoring opponents by 5.1 points per 100, and this is not a team with a lot of depth behind it. Charlotte has won a couple in a row and now has its next five games at home, a chance for the currently seven-seed Hornets to rack up wins and solidify their playoff standing.

 
Pelicans small icon 17. Pelicans (14-15, LW 17). Julius Randle was forced into the starting lineup due to an injury to Nicolas Mitotic, but it may be hard to take him out now — he has averaged 27.6 points per game on 59.3 percent shooting, hitting 50 percent from three, grabbing 11.2 boards per game, and a net rating of +13.8 in those games. However, the Pelicans can’t string together wins despite Randle’s play (they are 2-3 in those five games), in part because they struggle on the road, where they are 4-11 (the Pels are 10-4 at home).

 
Kings small icon 18. Kings (14-12, LW 18). Sacramento did what good teams do last week — went on the road and beat lesser teams. The Kings went 3-1 on a recent four-game road swing with wins over the Suns, Cavaliers, and Bulls — all struggling teams, but plenty of teams above Sacramento in these rankings have dropped games like those.) If the ninth-seed Kings are going to make the playoffs it will be because they did well in stretches like the one coming up: Sacramento’s next 13 games are against Western Conference teams in the playoff chase. Those are the teams they need to beat.

 
Spurs small icon 19. Spurs (14-14, LW 22). Congratulations to Gregg Popovich, who moved into fourth place on the all-time wins list for coaches on Tuesday night with 1,211, moving him past Pat Riley. Popovich is only 10 wins back of Jerry Sloan and should move into third on the list in the next couple of months (I’m not sure Popovich will coach long enough to catch Don Nelson or Lenny Wilkins at he top of that leaderboard). San Antonio has started 3-0 on a six-game homestand, wins the team needs if they plan to keep their playoff hopes alive in the deep West.

 
Jazz small icon 20. Jazz (13-15, LW 20). Last Thursday’s win against Houston, despite Rudy Gobert being ejected (wrongfully) in the opening minutes of the game, was probably Utah’s best win of the season. They celebrated that by going out on the road and dropping two more games (to San Antonio and OKC). This team remains maddeningly inconsistent. On the bright side, they have played the toughest schedule in the NBA so far and have had 18-of-28 games on the road, things should lighten up (although the Jazz are 4-6 at home, they need to get some wins in Salt Lake City).

 
Rockets small icon 21. Rockets (12-14, LW 16). While the defense remains the biggest problem for Houston, it’s been enough of the season now that Chris Paul’s slipping level of play — from elite to just good, for example his three-point percentage dropped from 38% last year to 33.9% this year, his PER from 24.4 to 18.5 — is a cause for concern. Especially since this is the first year of a four-year contract. The Rockets just looked bad losing all three games on a road trip (before beating Portland at home Tuesday), and with three more losses the Rockets will tie how many losses they had all of last season.

 
Heat small icon 22. Heat (11-15, LW 23). Dwyane Wade’s emotional farewell in his final game against LeBron James overshadowed a couple of quality road wins that came before it against the Suns and Clippers. The Heat have now won 4-of-6 and are just half-a-game out of the playoffs in the East, where their grit may be enough to get them invited to the dance, although they have played one of the easiest schedules in the league thus far and things will get tougher. That grit Eric Spoelstra prides his teams on will be put to the test.

 
Magic small icon 23. Magic (12-15, LW 19). Orlando is in Mexico City for two “home” games this week against the Bulls (Thursday) and the Jazz (Saturday), so now fans in other countries can marvel first-hand at the smart game of Nikola Vucevic. Orlando won a couple of games in a row against sub-.500 teams (Phoenix, Miami) then last week lost three straight to good teams (Denver, Indiana, and Dallas). Aaron Gordon and the Magic need to string together some wins to hold off Miami, Washington, and other teams with an eye on the final playoff slot in the East (which the Magic currently hold).

 
Nets small icon 24. Nets (10-18, LW 27). Brooklyn has been the NBA’s second worst team this season on clutch games (within 5 points in the final five minutes), going 5-12 — and that 17 clutch games is tied for the most in the league. That’s why the clutch win against Toronto last Friday was good to see, this team deserves a break, they work hard but just have not had the talent that wins out in the final minutes (especially with Caris LeVert out).

 
Wizards small icon 25. Wizards (11-16, LW 24). John Wall scoring one point in a loss to Cleveland last Saturday led him to come forward and say he’s been playing through a bone spur in his heel (I know some on Twitter scoffed at that, but Wall has a history of playing through injuries he should get treated). Wall sat out one game but is expected back in the lineup Wednesday night against Boston. It’s a matter of pain management, but this play is not helping Wall’s already limited trade value (because his max contract kicks in next season and nobody wants to be on the hook for that deal).

 
Hawks small icon 26. Hawks (6-20, LW 28). John Collins continues to impress upon his return from injury, averaging 18.1 points and shooting 62.2 percent in those 11 games. In his last five games, Collins is averaging 21.6 points and 11.6 rebounds a night. This team does have its moments, like beating Denver last Saturday. The Hawks now head out for 5-of-6 on the road.

 
Knicks small icon 27. Knicks (8-20, LW 25). Courtney Lee is back on the court, although he was a rusty 1-of-7 shooting in his first two games. Lee’s name will come up in a lot of trade talks leading up to the February deadline. Rookie Kevin Knox scored 26 points and had 15 rebounds in a loss to the Hornets, becoming only the second teenager in NBA history to go for 25-15 or better (the other is some guy named LeBron… not sure what ever happened to him).

 
Cavaliers small icon 28. Cavaliers (6-21, LW 26). Cleveland did okay in the George Hill trade, doing what a rebuilding team should do — taking on contracts other teams want to dump in exchange for draft picks and young players (this included a protected 2021 first rounder). Maybe the Cavaliers could have held out for a little more, but there is no guarantee they would have gotten it in a tight market. This worked. Next up on the trade block should be J.R. Smith.

 
Bulls small icon 29. Bulls (6-22, LW 29). The Bulls are 1-3 in the Jim Boylen era, with him coming in so out-of-touch old school he had players threatening a mutiny. Well done, Chicago. New coach or not, the biggest difference on the court is the return of Lauri Markkanen from an elbow injury. He has averaged 15.2 points per game, and while he’s struggled with the rust oh his shot the biggest key is he spaces the floor. The Bulls gave the elite Thunder defense problems last Friday because a Zach LaVine/Markkanen pick-and-pop pulled Steven Adams out of the paint and opened up driving lanes — the Bulls floor spacing is so much better with Markkanen in the lineup. Plus, he can do this.

 
Suns small icon 30. Suns (4-24, LW 30). Losers of 10 in a row, all I can offer Suns fans is that on Wednesday I dropped an NBA Draft preview podcast where we talk about Zion Williamson, why the shine is coming off R.J. Barrett, and there are thoughts on other top picks coming up in the next draft. Focus on that, you’ll feel better, especially with Devin Booker having to miss time with a hamstring injury.

Three Things to Know: If the Clippers were trying to impress Kawhi Leonard it went poorly

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LOS ANGELES — Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA. Today we come straight from Staples Center.

1) If the Clippers were trying to impress Kawhi Leonard Tuesday, it went poorly. When the discussion turns to speculation about where Kawhi Leonard could be playing next season, the Los Angeles Clippers are high on the list. He grew up in Southern California and wants to return there, sources say he doesn’t want to play with LeBron on the Lakers, and the Clippers have been surprisingly impressive this season but are a team without a true superstar that is looking to add one (or two, the Clippers reportedly want to add both Leonard and Kevin Durant).

Not that the notoriously media-shy Leonard cares about the speculation.

“I don’t buy into reading media, don’t have no social media, so just focus on what’s in front of me,” Leonard said before his Raptors took on the Clippers Tuesday night without him (due to a tweaked hip). “At that time it’s either my family or playing basketball.”

If the Clippers — or any team — is going to impress and entice Leonard, it’s not going to be with a well-crafted marketing plan to grow his brand (the people advising Leonard on the other hand…). Leonard presents the image of being focused only on what happens on the court.

That’s where the Clippers fell short Tuesday.

Actually, “fell short” is putting it kindly. The Clippers got thumped by 24 on their home court, their worst loss of the season. Playing without its superstar, Toronto looked like a team much closer to the NBA’s elite in terms of talent and execution than Los Angeles. The Raptors won 123-99 in a game that was not in doubt from early in the third quarter on.

“I think we just played bad,” Clippers’ guard Tyrone Wallace said, summing it up well. “We just had a rough night, we didn’t play well defensively.”

That was the starkest contrast: While the Clippers looked like a dazed team on the second night of a back-to-back (and without Lou Williams, who will miss a couple of weeks with a tweaked hamstring), the Raptors’ defenders were on a string — they switched, they rotated, they even threw in a zone for a few plays and the Clippers could not adapt fast enough.

Toronto turned the stops into shots in transition and the Clippers were not getting back or handling their scrambling defense well. Serge Ibaka feasted on the Clippers with 25 points.

However, the best news for the Raptors was the “return” of the real Kyle Lowry, who had 21 points on 8-of-13 shooting to break out of his slump (he had shot 8-of-42 over his previous five games).

Whatever Leonard decides to do this summer — stay in Toronto, come to Los Angeles, or choose from the 28 other teams that will be knocking on his door — the decision will not be based on the outcome of one December game. However, if the Clippers were trying to show off an impressive young core Leonard could join and elevate, this was not the effort that they needed.

Toronto, on the other hand, looked exactly like a team with an impressive young core. One Leonard is already elevating to the top of the East.

2) The good Rockets show up — especially the bench players — and Houston knocks off Portland. About once every week or so I watch a Rockets game and think, “they can get it together and turn this around.” Not turn around to the level they expected entering the season — they are not going to be a threat to the Warriors with this current roster — but there are nights they look like a playoff team and better than their sub-.500 record.

Tuesday was one of those nights, mostly thanks to hot play off the bench. Houston’s second unit outscored Portland’s 37-13, and they were the group that blew the game open at the end of the third and into the fourth. Danuel House and Gerald Green combined for 25 points, shooing 4-of-7 from three and 64.3 percent overall, and they had nine rebounds. Houston was +22 when they were on the court together.

James Harden had 29 points (which Chris Paul continued to struggle, with 11 points on 12 shots).

While the Rockets looked better, Portland struggled. There was too much isolation, not enough ball movement, and Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum took 53 percent of the team’s shots. The Trail Blazers were predictable, and that made the struggling Rockets defense look good.

I’ve seen too many good games followed by bad ones from Houston to suggest the Rockets have turned the corner, so let’s just say the good Rockets showed up for one night. We’ll see who shows up Thursday night against the Lakers.

3) Gregg Popovich passes Pat Riley, moves into fourth on the all-time coaching wins list. When it is all said and done, Gregg Popovich will go down as one of the best coaches in NBA history. The sustained excellence, the five rings, turning small-market San Antonio into an NBA franchise to be feared on the court and modeled off it, all will be part of his legacy.

So will all the wins he’s racked up — 1,211 of them after the Spurs win over the struggling Suns Tuesday night. That moved Popovich past Pat Riley into fourth on the all-time coaching wins list.

Popovich is just 10 wins shy of tying Jerry Sloan for third, something that will happen in the coming months. I don’t know if he’s going to coach long enough to catch Don Nelson or Lenny Wilkins at the top of that leaderboard (it would take more than 100 additional wins), but Popovich’s win total just adds to his legacy and place in history.

Three Things to Know: New look Bucks remind Raptors East full of threats

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Bucks rain threes, throw down dunks, remind Raptors the top of the East is a Battle Royale. Here’s my primary takeaway from Milwaukee’s 104-99 win in Toronto Sunday:

I can’t wait for the second round and beyond of the Eastern Conference playoffs next May.

Any combination of the big four teams — Toronto, Milwaukee, Boston, and Philadelphia — is going to be a compelling combination of slugfest and chess match. All those teams are deep with talent, have versatility, can knock down threes, can defend, and any one of them can win the East’s King of the Mountain battle next May (although the Sixers have a little work to do).

The Bucks reminded the Raptors on Sunday not to count them out.

Giannis Antetokounmpo was the focus of the army of long, athletic wing defenders the Raptors can roll out — Pascal Siakam, Kawhi Leonard, OG Anunoby, Danny Green — and, thanks to smart help (at different times and angles) they did as much as anyone can do to make Antetokounmpo look human, he finished with “just” 19 points on 15 shots. Of course, he also had 19 rebounds, 6 assists, but he didn’t take over the game. Toronto had clearly focused on making it difficult for the Greek Freak to beat them, although he still was doing this (even if it didn’t count).

What the Bucks had was other guys to step up. Brook Lopez was every bit of Splash Mountain scoring 19 points and going 5-of-8 from three, including a beautiful step back at one point. Then, with the game on the line, Malcolm Brogdon was doing this.

These are not the Jason Kidd Bucks anymore, this is a modern NBA team now — they took 39 threes and only 12 of their 87 shots came between 8 feet of the rim and the three-point arc (13.8 percent of their shots from that midrange). Credit the Raptors defense, that’s more midrangers than the Bucks usually take. However, under Mike Budenholzer these Bucks are committed to their style of play.

So is Toronto under Nick Nurse, and they took 44 threes, hitting 15 (34.1 percent). The Raptors just were not as efficient: Serge Ibaka had 22 points but needed 21 shots, Leonard had 20 points on 18 shots.

That is where Toronto needs Kyle Lowry to step up, but he is in the middle of a terrible shooting slump and was scoreless in this one (he did have seven assists, he’s more of a playmaker now, but he still needs to be a threat to score for it all to come together). Lowry was 0-of-5 Sunday, making him 5-of-32 in his last five games.

This was a highly entertaining, up-and-down game that for a few minutes became the Brogdon vs. Fred VanVleet shootout we all expected (VanVleet had 19 off the bench). Actually, it speaks to the depth of these rosters that this game could become that and never lose its energy.

Milwaukee got the win Sunday, but next May if these teams meet in the playoffs we’re all going to win.

2) In the wake of a 56-point blowout loss, Bulls players call for meetings, everybody vents. When Fred Hoiberg was fired, Bulls management didn’t give Jim Boylen the interim tag as the new coach, they gave him the job for the rest of this season and noted he’s under contract for next season and they want to bring him back.

The reason for this was to give him leverage to come in hard and shake things up — Boylen has called it “shock and awe” to borrow the military term. He said the team was out of shape, he’s running long, hard practices and benching starters when they struggle. He did that for the final 21 minutes Saturday 56-point blowout loss to the Celtics.

Sunday, players pushed back against the tactics. It almost led to a player mutiny where they didn’t show up to practice, but then Lauri Markkanen and Robin Lopez talked everyone into showing up and meeting — first a players’ only meeting, followed by one with coaches and the front office. There was a lot of venting to do.

Boylen has come in trying to change the culture of a Bulls team that needs it. Remember, he comes out of the Spurs organization, where Tim Duncan was open to Gregg Popovich coaching him hard and calling him out in front of the team as an example. Thing is, there is no Duncan on this Bulls team (on or off the court). When Hoiberg was the head coach Boylen could be the bad cop, hold guys accountable, and there was a balance, even if it didn’t work all that well. However, as the head coach, you can’t just be the bad cop or you lose guys. There has to be positives, there has to be rest for guys. More importantly, there must be explanations of why things are happening, trust needs to be built up. Do that and this generation of players will still run through walls for a coach — but if the coach just says “run through that wall” it doesn’t work anymore.

Everyone is adjusting to the new realities in Chicago. With Markkanen back and the team getting healthy, they should be good enough to move out of the East cellar. However, that’s going to take some work, from the players and coaches. And some open communication. That, at least, seems to be happening.

3) Julius Randle is beasting as a starter. When Nikola Mirotic went out with an injury, Julius Randle slid into the starting lineup and has played in a way that is going to make it very difficult to take him out of it. Randle has dropped at least 26 points in his last four games — all starts — and that includes 28 points, six rebounds, and five assists Sunday as the Pelicans knocked off the Pistons 116-108.

In his last four games as a starter, Randle is averaging 29.5 points and 11.3 rebounds. It might be time for coach Alvin Gentry to take Randle out of the Sixth Man of the Year running — a race he has been in the conversation for early this season — because he will start to many games. It’s hard to argue with production.

Three Things to Know: Russell Westbrook makes history, Paul George has 47 in comeback win

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Russell Westbrook makes history, Paul George scores 47 in Thunder’s dramatic comeback win. There was a point, right when Oklahoma City’s Terrance Ferguson missed a three with 7:16 left in the game keeping Brooklyn ahead by 16, that the Thunder’s win probability was down to 1.4 percent — there was a 98.6 percent chance the Nets would pull the upset.

But this was to be OKC’s big night.

It was that night because Russell Westbrook would finish with 21 points, 15 rebounds, and 17 assists — his 108th career triple-double, moving him past Jason Kidd into third on the all-time list.

It was OKC’s night because Paul George — having arguably the best season of his career so far — dropped 47 points, including hitting the game winner. (As a side note: How do both Spencer Dinwiddie and Rondae Hollis-Jefferson go with Westbrook and nobody slides over with George when George slips the pick> He was wide open because of it.)

The Thunder are one of the NBA’s hottest teams, having won four in a row and 9-of-11, with the NBA’s best defense as the cornerstone of what they do. Built on that defensive foundation, and between their two superstars, the Thunder find a way to get enough offense to rack up the victories. This was the Thunder team management there pictured a season ago, and this year they still get Andre Roberson back at some point.

The Thunder are one of the best teams in the West and look to be a threat next April and May when the playoffs roll around.

2) Toronto’s win shows they are the current class of the East, while Philadelphia has work to do. In the latest PBT Podcast we did a deep dive on the Sixers with NBC Sports Philadelphia’s Serena Winters — the team’s sideline reporter if you are watching on League Pass — and I asked her if the Sixers believed that they were right there with the East’s best. She said the team felt like right now it was half a step behind the elite, but that they could get there before the season ended.

Wednesday night that played out.

Toronto was clearly the better team in a 113-102 victory. It was a lot of things adding up.

• Philadelphia turned the ball over 21 times — 20.4 percent of their possessions or one in five trips down the court — as Toronto’s length and athleticism on defense threw the Sixers off their game.

Kawhi Leonard had his best game as a Raptor, looking like an MVP-level player again, scoring 36 points on 24 shots, hitting 5-of-6 from three, and on the other end disrupting Ben Simmons on offense and making five steals. Leonard was the best player on the floor.

• The Raptors have three big men they can throw at Joel Embiid, giving the Sixers cornerstone both different looks and keeping a fresh body on him at all times, plus really make Embiid work on both ends of the court. Embiid finished the night with 10 points on 5-of-17 shooting. In contrast, Jonas Valanciunas had 26 points in 17 minutes of play.

• The Toronto guards — Kyle Lowry, Danny Green, and in spots Fred VanVleet — also did a great job of digging down and helping on Embiid in the post and still getting back out to challenge J.J. Redick and other Sixers shooters.

• Toronto’s bench was back to its dominant ways for a night, outscoring the Philadelphia bench 41-18, led by OG Anunoby, Delon Wright and VanVleet.

There were bright spots for the Sixers — Jimmy Butler had 38 points and impressed.

As Winters’ said, the Sixers can get to the level of the elite by the end of the season, maybe with more time for their core to gel, maybe with some trade/waiver wire pickups just to bolster the depth. Philadelphia is good and they are close.

But right now, Toronto is the class of the East.

3) LeBron James takes over the fourth quarter for Lakers, but is that part of the problem in L.A.? Magic Johnson may want a more egalitarian offense for the Lakers, with multiple playmakers and scorers, but that ignores one fact:

Nobody takes over a game like LeBron James.

LeBron had 20 points in a dominant fourth quarter, leading the Lakers past the struggling Spurs 121-113. The Lakers have won four in a row and are 15-9 now on the season because LeBron is playing at a level that puts him in the MVP conversation.

The question Thursday became: If LeBron is that dominant, does it make it harder for the Lakers to attract a second superstar?

Kevin Durant said yes it can, for some players. It wasn’t a dig at LeBron, it was an honest statement — not every superstar in the NBA is at a place in their careers where teaming up with LeBron in Los Angeles is what’s best for them. It wasn’t for Paul George, who last summer decided he wanted to stay in Oklahoma City, when one summer before his people were saying he was destined to be a Laker.

More importantly, the Lakers may not be a fit for free agents coming up this summer. Look at Durant, for example. He struggled to find a balance of alpha status in OKC with Westbrook, in Golden State he may well be their best player (he has been in the last two NBA Finals) but that is Stephen Curry‘s culture and team. If KD wants to carve out his own legacy now is playing next to LeBron how to best do that? Durant notes playing with the greatness of LeBron forces even elite players (Dwyane Wade, Kevin Love, Chris Bosh, etc.) to change their games to fit around him. Plus, the combination of LeBron in the celebrity culture of Los Angeles creates an off-court environment that is not for everyone (Durant called it “toxic”).

The Lakers will get their next superstar to pair with LeBron. Maybe next summer, maybe in 19 months, but it will happen. Just don’t assume that every superstar wants to rush to play with LeBron on the Lakers — it’s just not a fit for everyone.

No matter how amazing it is to watch LeBron take over games in the fourth quarter.