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Not just numbers, David Griffin says being GM means handling “noise” around team

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Analytics are a part of the job.

Just often not the most important part.

Part of what has fueled the rise in popularity of the NBA in recent years has been player movement around the league — and how much fans love to talk about the possibilities. Fans love to play GM. Those fans are increasingly savvy and understand analytics better, they know how to go to the NBA stat page and look up detailed data, and they know how to work ESPN’s trade machine. It leads to more “who says no?” trade Tweets than overpriced coffee shops in Seattle.

Ask any current or former general manager/team president — for example, former Suns and Cavaliers GM David Griffin — about the job and they almost cut off the question to say there is so much more to it than a spreadsheet. For example, keeping players happy and helping them understand/deal with social media is now part of the gig. Even in the evaluation of players, there is the eye test and other intel gathered about them, all of which matters as much or more than just the data.

“It’s got to be a marriage of all of them, you know analytics are never the answer in and of themselves,” Griffin told NBC Sports. “But there is infinitely more data available to us thanks not only to SAP but Second Spectrum… they have given us far more robust data sets to make decisions from. I think because of that people think the answers are in the numbers, but the reality is the numbers only answer the better questions you ask it to solve. I think people lose sight of that. The numbers are a part of the process, they are not the answers in and of themselves.”

That’s the idea behind “GM School,” a new competition show coming to NBA TV (it premieres Wednesday night at 8 ET, with repeat broadcasts throughout the week). The show takes four contestants who are data-driven, die-hard basketball fans and pits them against each other in a series of challenges to show they have what it takes to be in a front office. The contestants don’t just have to pick players to draft (out of an anonymous pool), they need to articulate why they fit with the team philosophy. They have to do a press conference.

“I thought they did an excellent job,” Griffin said of the contestants. “Being at NBA TV before this and getting to see things in a totally different light, I had a different appreciation for this process than I would have otherwise. I thought they did a fantastic job — SAP and the partners affiliated with this — of putting together four really diverse contestants who all had strengths of their own, each was unique from the other, so it was a cool process.”

Like the real GM job, this is about more than the numbers.

“It’s not just taking into account everyone thinks they understand analytics — I hope we speak to the analytics crowd — but it’s about the totality, we hope, of what the job requires,” Griffin said.

There are things that a show like this could just not do justice to with a test.

For example, how to set up an organization that can handle the volume of noise that swirls around a good team. Griffin had to deal with that first hand as the GM of the Cavaliers during LeBron James’ second tour of duty with the franchise.

“One of the things that’s critical to running an organization that’s going to be all about winning — and the only thing that will mark success is winning a championship — is that you’re naturally going to be subjected to more noise around the process,” Griffin said. There’s going to be more tension in the system — and that can be a positive thing if you make it out. You have to become really adept at dealing with adversity and turning adversity into a positive, galvanizing force.

“I think you’ve seen Golden State do that this year with the blowup between Draymond [Green] and KD [Kevin Durant]. They’ve come out of that a stronger, better version of themselves, and that’s what you have to do as an elite franchise. All adversity becomes opportunity for you.”

It’s one thing for a Warriors’ team that is now veteran and savvy to embrace adversity — and tune out the social media noise it creates around the team — and it’s something else entirely for an up-and-coming team with players who have not been there before.

“I think that for teams that are going from being lottery bound year after year to being truly elite there are several steps in that process that are very difficult and painful. And people don’t always welcome adversity…” Griffin said. “You’re not going to get to a championship caliber team from a team of young kids who were in the lottery overnight.”

Some players get thrown off seeing the media used to deliver messages about them and their trade availability — as happened a lot with the Lakers/Anthony Davis saga around the trade deadline, for example. The Lakers, as an organization, has seen more than its fair share of drama over the years and understands how to handle it, but the young core players on the team were going through this part of the business for the first time.

Griffin said the key is being proactive — talking to players to help them understand it before everything overwhelms them.

“[The Lakers] were dealing with more media and more scrutiny than most teams ever do because they are one of the flagship franchises in our league,” Griffin said. “Magic Johnson grew up in that spotlight. I doubt anything happened that they weren’t prepared for. But what happens is LeBron’s presence by itself brings that kind of spotlight. It takes some time to learn how to deal with it.

“Again, if you don’t get in front of it from a leadership standpoint, if you let it just happen, the proliferation of sports media and social media, it just creates so much around your players that, to some degree, if you’re not telling them how to decipher it, they can’t help but to take it poorly. You need to do a really deft job as a leader of getting people to ignore those things. I think Kevin Durant called it a ‘toxic’ environment around a LeBron James team. I don’t think he meant that relative to LeBron and his actions. I think he meant it just relative to the sheer volume of noise around a team. That takes getting used to.”

Handling social media and its fallout is now part of a GM’s job. Like it or not.

“All of these players are on social media, they are subject to noise from more angles and at a greater volume than any players ever have been,” Griffin said. “And because of that, I think it makes it really important that you run the kind of organization that you love each other enough that you tell each other what you need to hear. You have to have conversations. You have to be in front of those messages with Lonzo Ball ahead of time. You have to talk to Brandon Ingram and Kyle Kuzma ahead of time. So that when those things happen, they understand it’s just a natural outcropping of being on a team of that magnitude. That it happens because you matter as a franchise.”

Whenever a GM job comes open in the NBA now, Griffin’s name is one of the first to come up. Most recently that was with the Pelicans (although the buzz All-Star Weekend is that things never really got too serious between the sides). Griffin is open to returning to the NBA, but he’s in a position to be picky about the gig he takes now.

“I think the blessing of doing what I’m doing relative to NBA TV is selectivity,” Griffin said. “It’s helped me be radically better at analyzing things than maybe I wouldn’t have been as good at. As I look at it now, the thing that would attract me to an opportunity is just the opportunity to be in lockstep with ownership. To have ownership, the coach, and the front office all on the same page moving forward and sharing a vision…

“You have to raise a family, and if you’re not going to come at it with that approach it’s probably not a situation that would speak to me.”

Jayson Tatum bombs way from half court to All-Star Skills Competition title

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CHARLOTTE, N.C. — It’s about how you finish.

Boston’s Jayson Tatum trailed in all three of his Skills Contest races on All-Star Saturday night, none worse than against sharpshooting rookie Trae Young of the Atlanta Hawks in the championship matchup. Young beat Tatum through the court, lined up his three, and while he did Tatum bombed away from half court on the run and… he called bank so it counts.

Tatum is your 2019 Skills Contest champion.

“The previous two rounds, the guy was ahead of me. Figured I’d let him get a shot attempt so I could get closer to the three-point line,” Tatum said. “I didn’t want to give Trae a chance. I honestly didn’t know I was going to hit the shot, but I had to give myself a chance, throw it up there, and it worked out for the best.”

Tatum dropped 30 for Team USA in its win in the Rising Stars Challenge Friday night, then gets the win Saturday in Skills. It’s been a weekend for Tatum.

Did he plan to fall behind in every race just for the drama?

“No, that was not the plan,” Tatum said. “I couldn’t get the pass down on the first try, but I was trying. I wanted to win.”

The competition was fairly entertaining from the start.

Karl-Anthony Towns helped with the random matchups, and that led to one first-rounder everyone wanted to see: De’Aaron Fox vs. Trae Young. Fox led the whole way, by quite a bit as Young struggled with his passing into the tire, but when Fox missed his first three it allowed Young to shoot the long-range running three, and he drained it for the win.

In the other first-round matchups, Nikola Jokic beat Nikola Vucevic, Mike Conley had a comfortable lead over Jayson Tatum but couldn’t hit the three and when Tatum got there he drained his for the win, and Doncic his three before Kyle Kuzma for the win.

In the second round, Tatum was behind again but beat Jokic by draining his first three, and Young had a comfortable win over Luka Doncic.

That up the Finals showdown that ended with a long-range bomb.

Lakers’ Kyle Kuzma scores 35, wins MVP, leads USA to victory in Rising Stars dunkfest

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CHARLOTTE — Nobody comes to the Friday night Rising Stars Challenge — the All-Star weekend showcase of first- and second-year stars — for the defense. Which is good, because there isn’t any. Zero. Nada. Your Saturday blacktop pickup game at the local park has guys that care more about defense than you see in this game.

What the Rising Stars has are dunks. A lot of big dunks. And some threes. Then more dunks.

For example, the Hawks’ John Collins was showing off why he was in the dunk contest, complete with a pass off the backboard to himself.

As for the game itself, the USA won 161-144 over the World.

The Lakers Kyle Kuzma raced out to 23 first-half points and finished with 35 to earn MVP honors.

“Last year I didn’t really play that hard,” Kuzma said of his first time in this game. “This year I just came out, one, I wanted to get some conditioning, and, two, why not MVP? You’re in the game. So might as well just try.”

Kuzma also broke out the windmill.

D’Aaron Fox said before the game he wanted to break the assist record for the Rising Stars, and while he fell short of that number he had 16 for the USA. Boston’s Jayson Tatum had 30 and Donovan Mitchell had 20 for the USA. Ben Simmons led the Word team of 28 points.

As for highlights, there were plenty.

Atlanta’s Trae Young hit six threes and had this dime.

He also had the play of the night, nutmegging Deandre Ayton.

Philly’s Ben Simmons had a couple of throwdowns.

The Timberwolves Josh Okogie had the putback of the night (teammate and All-Star Karl-Anthony Towns sat courtside wearing an Okogie jersey).

Lakers forward Kyle Kuzma: ‘I’d rather be talked about bad in L.A. than play in Orlando and not get talked about’

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Kyle Kuzma gained acclaim last season because he played well and played for the Lakers, the NBA’s most prominent franchise. Then, LeBron James went to Los Angeles and brought even more attention to the Lakers.

SiriusXM NBA Radio:

Kuzma:

I wouldn’t want it any other way. I want people to talk about me, good or bad. Because if they’re not, you’re not doing something right. I’d rather be talked about bad in L.A. than play in Orlando and not get talked about.”

It’s great Kuzma has this mentality while playing in Los Angeles. The glitz of a large market can sidetrack some players. He has acclimated well. Few players would admit it so bluntly, but if this is the lifestyle Kuzma wants, good for him.

However, the Lakers will likely try to trade for Anthony Davis this offseason. That could mean sending Kuzma to small-market New Orleans. Trying to win a title during LeBron’s prime, the Lakers could also deal the young Kuzma for a different older, better player.

At least it probably won’t be to Orlando. The Magic don’t have a star worth trading Kuzma for. Aaron Gordon comes closest, but he probably wouldn’t fit well with LeBron.

D’Angelo Russell calls trade from Lakers the ‘best thing that happened in my career’

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D'Angelo Russell is now an Eastern Conference All-Star, albeit as an injury replacement as a member of the Brooklyn Nets. Just a short time ago, Russell was a top pick for the Los Angeles Lakers before a trade sent him to New York.

Russell is producing for the Nets, although whether he’s doing it at an All-Star level is up for some debate. Meanwhile, things are a bit tumultuous back in his old home of LA.

Trade rumors have plagued the young bucks on the Lakers all season long, and just because the trade deadline has passed doesn’t mean guys like Kyle Kuzma, Brandon Ingram, or Josh Hart can relax.

For that, Russell is glad. Talking to Bleacher Report this week, the Nets guard said that he was happy that he didn’t have to go through what the youngsters in Los Angeles are dealing with.

Via B/R:

“I can’t imagine what they’re trying to block out,” Russell says. Later, he adds: “If [the Lakers] didn’t let me go then, they were gonna let me go now, and I’d be going through what they’re going through. Best thing that happened in my career.”

It’s certainly true that Russell would likely be part of a package or a superstar offer if he were still with the Lakers today. Whether LA will be able to pull off a trade with the guys they have now is another question altogether.

In any case, no young player wants to know that they aren’t wanted, or feel inferior, or be seen as merely an asset. Being in LA is great for LeBron James, but it doesn’t seem all that beneficial to younger players. It seems like Russell has found a home in Brooklyn and is happy to be part of a burgeoning young core with the Nets.