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Five players most likely to be traded this season

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Jimmy Butler, Timberwolves

Even with all the reported issues in negotiation between Minnesota and other teams, Butler must make this list. He wants out, and Tom Thibodeau at least said he’d honor Butler’s trade request. It’s unclear precisely what Thibodeau means by that, but Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor could always get involved, and he’s more likely to deal Butler.

In the interest of variety, the rest of this list will ignore players with heightened trade alerts simply due to Butler’s availability. Minnesota could use this as a method to unload Gorgui Dieng. The Timberwolves could get another point guard then deal Jeff Teague or Tyus Jones. The Heat are reportedly talking about trading Justise Winslow, Goran Dragic and/or Josh Richardson for Butler.

Kyle Korver, Cavaliers

Even after losing LeBron James, Cleveland is trying to maintain perception of legitimacy. That could mean trading the 37-year-old Korver to a winner. He’s still a dangerous 3-point shooter, and his contract – $7.56 million salary this season, $3.44 million of $7.5 million guaranteed next season – is quite manageable. The Cavs could see trading Korver to a contender as doing right by him, a move that would be respected around the league. And they’d get positive assets for a player extremely unlikely to contribute to their next winning team.

Marquese Chriss, Rockets

Chriss just got traded from the Suns to Houston, but don’t assume he’ll stick there all season. Rockets general manager Daryl Morey loves to wheel and deal and is especially willing to shuffle players during the season. There’s probably a place for Chriss to develop his tools in the NBA, but it might not be on a championship contender. The 21-year-old has looked so far from understanding the game well enough to help at the highest levels. If he shines with the Rockets early, they could trade him for someone more experienced and dependable. If he doesn’t play well (or maybe even if he does), Houston might just want to unload his $3,206,160 salary considering his the luxury-tax hit.

Courtney Lee, Knicks

Lee denies he wants to be traded, but he can still see the writing on the wall: He no longer fits in New York. The Knicks are rebuilding and eying 2019 free agency. Lee is 32 and due $12,759,670 in 2019-20. That salary might make Lee difficult to move, but he can still play. Plenty of teams can use another 3-and-D wing.

Dewayne Dedmon, Hawks

Dedmon is a helpful player on an expiring ($7.2 million ) contract who’s stuck on a bad team – usually a set of factors that lead to a trade. But few good teams need a center, so his market is more limited. Dedmon’s combination of production and salary give him an edge in trade likelihood over other centers on expiring contracts on bad teams: Magic’s Nikola Vucevic, Bulls’ Robin Lopez, Kings’ Kosta Koufos. Atlanta also already has John Collins, Omari Spellman and Alex Len. The Hawks should want to get what they can for Dedmon then give more playing time to those younger bigs.

It’s official, Cavaliers sign David Nwaba to one-year, $1.5 million contract

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We’ve known this was coming for a while, and it’s a good fit, but on Saturday it finally became official.

David Nwaba is a member of the Cleveland Cavaliers.

This is a one-year, $1.5 million contract. This gives Cleveland 13 players on guaranteed contracts, plus restricted free agent Rodney Hood (who will end up playing for the Cavaliers next season, the question is will it be for a new contract or for the qualifying offer of $3.4 million).

Nwaba is a quality pick up for the Cavaliers, he looks to have developed into a solid NBA role player. He’s a wing out of Cal Poly SLO of the Big West who showed promise for the Lakers a couple of seasons ago (spending time in the G-League as well) but got squeezed by the numbers, ended up in Chicago last season where he averaged 7.6 points, 4.7 rebounds, and 1.3 assists per game playing 23 minutes a night. Then he got squeezed by the numbers in Chicago as well and became a free agent.

He’s going to have to carve out minutes in Cleveland. J.R. Smith will start at the two, likely with Jordan Clarkson behind him (to play next to rookie point guard Colin Sexton), at the three it will be a mix of Cedi Osman, Kyle Korver, and Sam Dekkar. There are minutes to be had there, and Nwaba is plenty familiar with having to prove himself to get run. Nwaba will find a role.

Report Cavaliers still trying to trade J.R. Smith or Kyle Korver

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The Cavaliers are not going full tear-it-down rebuild. At least not yet. They re-signed Kevin Love and other veterans — George Hill and Tristan Thompson, for example — and while they are not dangerous they are a potential playoff team in a down East.

However, some of those veterans could be on the move this season.

J.R. Smith and Kyle Korver, in particular, remain on the trade block, Joe Vardon of Cleveland.com reiterated on his latest podcast.

That’s not new news, they have shopped those two around all off-season, but there have been no offers to the team’s liking. Yet. Maybe an injury in training camp or early in the season will change the dynamic and a better offer will come in. Maybe the Cavaliers will just accept the lesser offers as they best they can do. However, one way or another one or both of those two will be on the move before the trade deadline to a playoff team.

Smith will make $14.7 million this season and has just a $3.9 million guaranteed for 2019-20. Korver will earn $7.5 million this season and also has just a $3.4 million guaranteed for the following season if a team wants to buy him out.

Report: Clippers trading Sam Dekker to Cavaliers

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It’s likely that the big moves of the summer have already come and gone. Now, teams are just jostling around to try to work out their final rosters as they head into training camp and the preseason come fall.

In accordance with that idea, on Sunday, the Cleveland Cavaliers reportedly traded for Los Angeles Clippers forward Sam Dekker.

ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski says that Los Angeles is unlikely to take back a player in return for Dekker, making room for an extra roster spot. The Cavaliers, who are in transition after a LeBron James left for the Los Angeles Lakers, might be a better fit for Dekker moving forward.

Via Twitter:

The Cavaliers have a bevy of young wing players that nobody is quite sure what they will do with. It’s likely that Kyle Korver could get traded over the course of the season, but guys like RFA Rodney Hood, JR Smith, Cedi Osman, and Jordan Clarkson don’t yet have defined roles for the upcoming year.

Dekker mostly plays the power forward position, although he always sees some time at the 3. Last year Dekker saw his numbers take a dip in production in comparison to his sophomore season with the Houston Rockets, so it’s going to be an uphill climb for him.

It’s likely that Dekker’s ceiling is as a rotation player, and he doesn’t appear to be scraping that notion for a playoff contending team any longer. He’s going to have to work to get back to that position, and playing with the Cavaliers should offer Dekker an opportunity as they go into camp.

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Report: 76ers trading Richaun Holmes to Suns, signing Jonah Bolden

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The Thunder-Hawks-76ers three-team trade was reportedly on hold to becoming official while Philadelphia eyed another move.

Trading Jerryd Bayless (and surely something positive, like a draft pick) for Kyle Korver? The 76ers could still do that.

But this appears to be the move that had to precede the three-team trade – and the move that completed the Suns’ trade with the Nets.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

David Aldridge of NBA.com:

The Suns did well to add Richaun Holmes, a 24-year-old energy center. The only question is whether did it in the optimal way.

Instead of trading a second-rounder to go from Jared Dudley‘s $9,530,000 salary to Darrell Arthur‘s $7,464,912 salary, Phoenix could have cleared the cap room necessary to acquire Holmes by waiving Davon Reed or Shaquille Harrison.

Instead, Phoenix will keep Reed and Harrison. The Suns should know Reed and Harrison, both of whom played limited minutes as rookies last year, better than outsiders do. To a certain extent, there’s little choice but to defer to the team’s judgment.

Holmes was behind Joel Embiid and Amir Johnson at center in Philadelphia. Given Embiid’s injury history, third center is an important role on the 76ers. But, after Nemanja Bjelica backed out of his deal with them, they traded for Mike Muscala as their stretch four. However, unlike Bjelica (who swung more toward small forward when switching positions), Muscala swings toward center. He provides enough depth behind Embiid and Johnson.

So, Holmes became the odd man out with Philadelphia needing to clear a roster spot to sign 2017 No. 36 pick Jonah Bolden (a player I liked quite a bit in the draft).

Bolden’s minimum salary would have been $5,721,234 over the next four years. So, he got a little more and likely some of it guaranteed. In exchange, he gave the 76ers team control at a cheap salary for the longest possible time. He’s betting against himself.

After signing Bolden into cap space, Philadelphia can now execute the deal with Oklahoma City and Atlanta.