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LaVar Ball says Lakers are Lonzo’s team, not LeBron’s. Should we care?

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This summer, the Lakers fired a clear shot across the bow of Lonzo Ball. First, they went out and got veteran point guard Rajon Rondo. Then, after Summer League, Magic Johnson effusively praised Josh Hart‘s point guard play, saying he could see Hart starting for the Lakers.

The message to Lonzo was clear — you’re no longer treated like The Golden Child. There will be no codling. You had a good rookie season (the only reason it was seen as a disappointment to some was Magic’s ridiculous praise after the draft set the bar unfairly high), but it’s time to take a big step forward. Show the Lakers you’ve developed a more consistent shot. Show them you can be part of winning right now. Show you can fit with LeBron James and play well off the ball (something he did at UCLA). LeBron is here and the Lakers are about wins now, not development, and if another point guard gives them a better chance to win than Lonzo, the other guy will get the minutes.

Of course, none of that is going to stop LaVar Ball from saying stupid… things. Over-the-top braggadocio has worked for him so far, it’s built him a brand and got him a big Facebook show, why stop now?

The senior Ball’s latest comments came on Los Angeles hip-hop powerhouse radio station Power 106, where LaVar said the Lakers’ are Lonzo’s team, not LeBron’s.

Let’s get the obvious out of the way: we all know that’s crap. Anywhere LeBron goes, it’s his team. His locker room. It’s not even up for debate.

LaVar also said Lonzo and LeBron together will win at least two titles.

The question is, do we care anymore what he says? Honestly, I don’t. However, I also have a feeling this story will generate a lot of traffic. I sense a lot of people care.

I doubt LeBron knows or cares what LaVar says. Much like dealing with the current president on Twitter, better not to respond because it drags LeBron down to that level.

Last season in Los Angeles, LaVar and his sideshow were a much bigger deal outside the locker room than in it, where Lakers’ players brushed off LaVar’s antics and comments. Lonzo was bothered least of all. Most players have been around a lot of over-the-top, pushy AAU and college parents, they just tune all that out. As the NBA season wore on, LaVar focused more on his other two sons (and playing in Lithuania).

However, for the Lakers’ organization, LaVar is a distraction. The shot across the bow this summer was not just at Lonzo — the Lakers with LeBron are back near the top of the NBA food chain, and they don’t want the distractions. The Lakers are not going to trade Lonzo because of his father (in fact, it makes him harder to trade, something the team found in talks this summer — a fact not lost on LaVar), but at some point, there may be blowback. The Lakers are now past the rebuilding phase, they want to win now and figure out what players on the current roster can be part of a contender once they land another star (via trade or free agency). Lonzo needs to prove he can stay healthy, his shot has improved, and that he should be part of that future.

If not, he’ll be out. And it won’t matter what LaVar wants or says.

Lonzo Ball had arthroscopic surgery on knee Tuesday, should be ready for training camp

Associated Press
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It’s done.

As expected, Lonzo Ball has had left knee surgery on Tuesday and is currently in recovery. He reportedly will be good to go by training camp in September.

Ball averaged 10.2 points and 7.2 assists per game last season and made the NBA All-Rookie second team. This summer he had been working hard on his conditioning and jumper before the injury.

Ball will be asked to push the pace (as he did last season) and be a secondary ball handler who can create shots when LeBron does not have the ball in his hands. They fit together better on the court than some people think (Lonzo did play off the ball some at UCLA), but the challenge for L.A.of teams helping off Lonzo to double/trap LeBron on the perimeter is real.

The Lakers also took a couple of shots across the bow of Ball — and his father LaVar — this summer. First there was the signing of Rajon Rondo, then Magic Johnson said this about Josh Hart at Summer League:

The message is clear, the days of soft-pedaling and catering to Ball are over. He must earn his starting job, and there are legit challengers for his minutes. At some point, if the balance of off-court distractions and on-court production gets out of alignment, Ball’s job and standing with the Lakers are not safe.

But for now, he just needs to get right before the season.

Blazers win 2018 NBA Las Vegas Summer League Championship vs. Lakers

AP
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The Portland Trail Blazers are your 2018 NBA Las Vegas Summer League Champions. I want Multnomah County just to drink that in for a minute.

Tuesday night’s Final was not a close one, with the Trail Blazers in control of the game for most of the time. Portland jumped out to an early 31-19 lead, and were led by KJ McDaniels, who eventually took home the championship game’s MVP honors.

On the other side of the floor, it was Summer League MVP Josh Hart who had been ejected in the fourth quarter. Portland’s largest lead was 24 points, and it was surely a frustrating night for the young Lakers Squad.

Via Twitter:

McDaniels led the way for Portland, finishing with 17 points, seven rebounds, and one assist on 57 percent shooting from the field. The Blazers had six players in double figures, and helped shut down LA from 3-point range, forcing them to shoot just 3-of-21 from deep.

Hart scored 12 points for the Lakers, and Los Angeles had just three players in double figures. As a team, LA shot 39 percent from the field during the 18-point loss.

This Summer League playoff win doesn’t quite make up for the 2000 Western Conference Finals between these two rivals, But Blazers fans have to be happy that their team at least got a sniff of a deep playoff run.

No doubt they will be partying on SE Division tonight.

Lakers’ Josh Hart get ejected during Summer League Final (VIDEO)

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Josh Hart was the Las Vegas Summer League MVP for the Los Angeles Lakers. He scored a whopping 37 points during Monday night’s 2OT win against the Cleveland Cavaliers, but apparently it was just too much of him to finish Tuesday’s Final against the Portland Trail Blazers.

Hart didn’t agree with an official’s decision — presumably on a no-call — late in the fourth quarter, and he had some choice words for the referee as the floor changed possession. The Lakers guard already had one technical foul from earlier in the game, so his second earned him an ejection. It was his second of Summer League.

That’s not necessarily a good look for Hart, although it’s not as though Summer League has a real impact on a player’s career in the long run.

Should Hart have been upset that he did not get a foul? Probably not, seeing as how he led with his elbow. No doubt Lakers brass will be more concerned by the fact that he was ejected from not one but two Summer League games during his MVP run.

Hart will have to get his emotions under control as we head into the regular season for Los Angeles.

The Trail Blazers beat the Lakers in the Final, 91-73, with KJ McDaniels taking home the championship game MVP honors.

Lakers’ Josh Hart wins Summer League MVP

Associated Press
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The Lakers wanted to test Josh Hart this summer: What would happen if they gave him a more substantial role? He was solid as a backup point guard last season (a good showing for a rookie), averaging 7.9 points per game and shooting 39.6 percent from three, but with Lonzo Ball and Rajon Rondo in the fold point guard minutes will be hard to come by next season.

What happened if they put the ball in Hart’s hands and made him the leader of a team on and off the court?

Hart responded by winning the NBA Las Vega Summer League MVP, averaging 24.2 points a game and leading the Lakers to the championship game. He dropped 37 on the Cavaliers and Collin Sexton in the semi-finals.

The award was announced Tuesday, in advance of the title contest between Hart and his Lakers vs. the Portland Trail Blazers.

Hart is the second Laker in a row to win the award, last year Lonzo Ball won it in leading the Lakers to a Summer League crown.

It’s an honor, but don’t assume Summer League MVP means NBA success. Sure, Damian Lillard won the award, but he was co-MVP with Josh Shelby. Glen Rice III won the award. The MVP list includes Kyle Anderson and Tyus Jones and other good but not All-Star players.

Hart also made the All-NBA Summer League first team. (Both the MVP award and All-NBA Summer League teams were voted on by a select media pannel.)

Here are the Las Vegas All Summer League teams:

All-NBA Summer League First Team

Wendell Carter Jr. (Chicago)
Josh Hart (Los Angeles Lakers)
Kevin Knox (New York)
Collin Sexton (Cleveland)
Christian Wood (Milwaukee)

MGM Resorts All-NBA Summer League Second Team

Deandre Ayton (Phoenix)
Wade Baldwin IV (Portland)
Jaren Jackson Jr. (Memphis)
Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (Los Angeles Lakers)
Trae Young (Atlanta)