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Report: Spurs preferred Joel Embiid or Ben Simmons in Kawhi Leonard trade

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Summer in the NBA was a little odd this year. Things happened quickly with LeBron James heading to the Los Angeles Lakers, and after Kawhi Leonard was traded to the Toronto Raptors, things sort of settled down. Everyone seems to be waiting for the summer of 2019.

Meanwhile, conversations are still abound when it comes to Leonard and where he ended up this year. Eventually, the Raptors were able to put together a package around DeMar DeRozan that put Leonard in Ontario for the upcoming season. Beyond? We don’t know about that yet.

Many were underwhelmed with the haul the San Antonio Spurs reigned in for their former No. 1 player and Finals MVP. Leonard obviously tanked some of his trade value by letting his desires to leave Texas (likely for LA) but DeRozan didn’t seem like fair value.

That left many to speculate what kind of deals the Spurs could have put together, and perhaps which they turned down. Even further, which deals might San Antonio been rebuffed on?

According to ESPN’s Zach Lowe, the Sixers turned down San Antonio’s feeler for a deal involving either Joel Embiid or Ben Simmons. Rumor had it that Markelle Fultz could have been on the table, but Lowe shut that down.

Via The Lowe Post at around 28:00:

“There is no evidence that the Spurs wanted Fultz. I’ve been told the Spurs never asked for Fultz, and actively didn’t want Fultz, and in fact wanted one of the two big guys.”

The conversation between Lowe and Sixers guard JJ Redick was an interesting one, with other tidbits coming from the sharp-shooting veteran. Redick went into detail about how he felt the media treated Fultz last season, and also mentioned that he thought LeBron heading to the Lakers had been years in the making.

There has already been some reporting that Leonard has purchased property in Toronto rather than renting, which could be a sign that Leonard wants to stay. It could also be that he’s getting into the real estate speculation game in Canada’s largest city. Who knows with that guy?

Perhaps the most unfortunate part of Leonard heading to a team like Toronto, where it is unclear whether he would like to stay, is that we have to have much of the same conversation we had about him as we did the entirety of this past season. That storyline was boring to start with, and it’s stretched beyond the possibility of any kind of satisfying answer.

Good luck with that one, Raptors fans.

JJ Redick explains why he was upset at coverage of Markelle Fultz last year

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JJ Redick famously lashed out at reporters last season for covering seemingly every moment of 2017 No. 1 overall pick Markelle Fultz’s workout routine last season. The Philadelphia 76ers guard chided reporters for zeroing in on a player who was just 19 years old at the time, and who was clearly going through some sort of odd mental block with his shooting form.

During Zach Lowe’s podcast on Thursday, Redick elaborated on his emotions at that time, saying that he felt it was out of line for media to continually publish updates on Fultz during practices.

Redick’s response comes at around 35:00 during Lowe’s podcast:

You have a responsibility to cover the story, I get it … There’s a tension to it. I think whatt made me angry that day, and it had been festering, was the way in which people were physically covering him with the cell phones.

That was like our third practice leading up to the trade deadline, and I think the trade deadline had just passed, so we had three practices in the span of that weak. Every time we’d finish practice, or finish shootaround, and the doors would open for the media … you’d see this mad rush to get prime footage location. Everyone would get their cellphones out and they’d start recording him … doing who the fuck knows. Dribbling a basketball, shooting a free throw … mundane things. We, by that point, had seen months of him shooting.

On that particular day, Bryan Colangelo had a press conference … and they all came in with body language like they were vultures preying over a dying, decaying body. The kid was 19, he’s clearly going through something. I got angry … basically cussed them out.

He was my rookie so I guess I was protective but also empathetic. Whatever he was going through, physically or mentally, as an athlete we’ve all been there. There’s varying degrees of extremes to that but we’ve been there.

Lowe: There were also people in your organization who were saying, ‘Why is he out there when the media is coming in?’

Redick: That was his choice. Markelle is an adult, he wanted to be out there.

As an athlete, Redick’s disposition is understandable. He is going to be loyal to his teammates, and have more empathy for the athlete’s side of things. But the line of morality for journalists doesn’t necessitate shielding legal adults who are struggling to perform on a basketball court. That was the duty of the 76ers, if anything. Readers seemed to eventually tire of hearing about Fultz and his issues, although local editors in Philadelphia probably saw less of that.

Redick doesn’t have the experience or training to decide what is newsworthy and when. That is up to editors and journalists covering teams. The real burden lay with the Sixers when it came to Fultz last season. Teams close practices to the media all the time, and the reality is it isn’t natural for media to attend one-on-one workouts for individual players. Media access for those types of things are decided by front office.

The 76ers decided not to (or could not) dissuade Fultz from being in front of the media during the time they were allowed into the practice facility. That’s on Fultz, and the Sixers. Fultz made an adult decision to allow the media to cover him during a vulnerable time. That’s probably not what Redick wanted — and my personal opinion is to concur — but that’s what happened.

The Sixers could have just as easily kept him away, and had private sessions with Fultz until he returned to some kind of form becoming of an NBA player. Videoing the No. 1 overall pick from a $1 billion sports franchise was not just within the realm of journalistic morality, it was necessary from a duty of coverage standpoint, particularly for local outlets in Philly.

Redick can feel the way he feels. He has that right. Journalists cover what they do, with years of training to dictate how to do it. They don’t have to agree. For Sixers fans, the hope is that trainer Drew Hanlen really has fixed Fultz’s jumper, so we can put this story to bed.

I’ll agree with Redick on one point: the whole story is quite tired.

JJ Redick on what derailed Clippers: ‘Donald Trump-level pettiness’

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The Los Angeles Clippers are over. Well, at least the version that we have become accustomed to over the past decade or so. Chris Paul is with the Houston Rockets. Blake Griffin is with the Detroit Pistons. DeAndre Jordan is a Dallas Maverick.

All that’s left is Doc Rivers and a question mark about whether or not this franchise can rebuild after what was arguably its most successful run.

JJ Redick was one of those core players for Los Angeles that is in a new location, signing a second one-year deal with the Philadelphia 76ers this summer. Redick is always one for a good quote, and will often shoot it straight when asked direct questions. During a recent podcast, Redick gave some insight about why he felt the Clippers locker room sort of fell apart at the end.

Via Pardon My Take:

I don’t think there was one moment. Doc used to always talk about how when one group was together for a long period of time, instead of getting closer together you end up pointing fingers at each other. It was weird because separately everybody was really cool with each other, off the court everybody sort of got along. And then, there was just so much pettiness, it was just pettiness. It’s weird to think what we had the potential to accomplish and what ultimately derailed that was pettiness. Like, Donald Trump-level pettiness.

Redick went on to say that he felt that the Clippers were bogged down by “passive aggressive bullshit” and didn’t exclude himself from being party to that environment. He also said he didn’t think the main characters of the LA drama necesarily hated each other.

Of course, the Clippers during that time were always supposed to be the team that was about to break through but never could make it either due to playoff failure, injuries, or both. No doubt the locker room issues compounded on top of that.

Toward the end of their run in Los Angeles together, it seemed that you could feel some of this bubble up when you watched Clippers games, and rumors kept servicing about reported rifts between this player or that player. It’s certainly interesting to see that confirmed at least in part by Redick some time later.

Celtics dominate Sixers in Game 2 with their most important trait: consistency

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The Boston Celtics don’t have Kyrie Irving. They don’t have Gordon Hayward. What they do have is perhaps the best coach of these young NBA playoffs in Brad Stevens, and a consistency that their opponents in the Philadelphia 76ers sorely lack. While you can trust the process all you want, the Celtics are trusting their bench players and young rotation guys for even contributions.

To that end, Boston beat Philadelphia, 108-103, to take a 2-0 lead in the semifinal matchup between the two teams on Thursday.

Philadelphia was far more assertive offensively in the first half of Game 2 than they were in Game 1. The Sixers moved the ball, getting double-digit performances in the first two quarters from three starters. Philadelphia shot much better from the 3-point line, amassing more made triples in the first half (7) than they did during the entirety of Game 1 (5).

Meanwhile the Celtics struggled offensively out of the gate, only finally finding a solution to the Sixers’ redoubled efforts on defense late in the second quarter. Down by 21 with five minutes to play in the second, an offensive surge led by Jaylen Brown and Terry Rozier saw the Sixers stall defensively, and helped Boston push it to just 56-51 in favor of Philadelphia to end the half.

The Sixers continued their uneven play to start the third quarter. Philadelphia’s offense seemed to slow, particularly after going through first and second reads on set plays. The Sixers stood around, with only the strong side of the floor moving as weak side shooters stood. Boston used Philadelphia’s stagnation to create turnovers, scoring 16 points off changes of possession alone and beating up the Sixers in the transition game, 19-16.

Philadelphia’s poor play apparently didn’t sit with coach Brett Brown, either. Upset with Ben Simmons‘ decision-making, the Sixers coach sat his star point guard for a huge stretch between the third and fourth quarters, more than 12 minutes of game clock. Simmons finished with seven assists and six rebounds, but just one point.

Boston used the stagnant Philly attack to dominate, and the momentum was clearly in favor of the Celtics toward the end of the game. Although the score wasn’t out of reach for the 76ers, the game appeared to be emotionally capped off after Rozier sent an alley-oop to the sky for Jayson Tatum with 2:23 left.

The final chance at a stop for the Sixers was emblematic of Philadelphia’s defensive issues, too. After forcing the Celtics to rotate the ball on offense with less than 15 seconds to go in the game, Al Horford wound up with the ball at the top of the 3-point arc. Embiid jumped out to cover him, giving Horford the open lane for the drive and the easy score with 8.3 seconds left, giving Boston a five-point lead.

Horford could be seen talking to Tatum immediately after the bucket, apparently surprised he was so wide open. The Sixers had happy feet on defense all night, and despite having less active talent, Boston again played a better team game on both sides of the ball as they ground out the win.

For Philly, JJ Redick led the way with 23 points along with three rebounds and two assists. Robert Covington had 22 points, nine rebounds, two assists, and two steals. Embiid contributed 20 points — albeit on 36 percent shooting — with 14 rebounds and five assists.

The Celtics saw a strong performance from Tatum, leading Boston’s scorers with 21 points, two rebounds, and two assists. Rozier continued his playoff hot streak, adding 20 points, nine assists, and seven rebounds. Marcus Smart, wounded thumb and all, scored 19 points with five rebounds, three assists, and two steals.

Game 3 is back in Philadelphia on Saturday. The Sixers will need to play more evenly if they expect to make a series out of this thing.

Sixers players douse Brett Brown, present him with bell after closing Heat (VIDEO)

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The Philadelphia 76ers are moving on. Let’s just try to process that for a moment.

After beating the Miami Heat on Tuesday night, 104-91, this iteration of the Sixers experienced their first playoff series win together. It was also the first series win for coach Brett Brown as the man in charge of an NBA team.

As such, players gathered in the locker room after the win to hear Brown speak about the win, and about how the team had more to give and to learn as they moved forward together in the playoffs.

When Brown concluded his speech, he tried to hand off the victory bell to JJ Redick. As soon as Redick received it, he bestowed the honor of the bell right back upon Brown.

That’s when teammates showered Brown with whatever they had nearby, and Brown rung the bell.

Man, what a moment.