Jevon Carter

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Report: Suns trading former No. 4 pick Josh Jackson to Grizzlies

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The Suns drafted Josh Jackson No. 4 overall just two years ago.

Already, Phoenix is treating him like a salary dump.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Chris Herrington of The Daily Memphian:

Jackson’s short career has been marred by legal issues, off-court problems and frustration. And poor play. That’s the part that’s most difficult for teams to get over.

Given far more playmaking responsibility than he can handle, Jackson has too frequently forced and missed bad shots. He has shown flashes of impressive creation, but he hasn’t sustained it nearly enough.

With Jackson due $7,059,480 next season, the Suns aren’t waiting around for him. They needed to clear money to sign Ricky Rubio and keep Kelly Oubre‘s qualifying offer intact.

Neither De'Anthony Melton nor Jevon Carter did much as rookies. Melton is younger and more dynamic and has more upside.

This trade is costly for Phoenix, letting another team take fliers on Jackson and Melton and surrendering two second-round picks. But the Suns are clearly targeting their type of players without much concern for the value.

The Grizzlies are the latest team to take advantage.

Korver’s $7.5 million salary is just $3.44 million guaranteed until Sunday. He has declined significantly at age 38, especially defensively. But the sharpshooter can still help a good team in a limited role.

Watch Grizzlies miss free throw, five jumpers on one possession (video)

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Teams sometimes repeatedly grab offensive rebounds and miss putbacks. An 0-for-5 – or even more – possession isn’t unheard of.

But missing a free throw then five jump shots, four of which would have been assisted, on a single possession? That’s a sight to behold.

The Grizzlies did it in their loss to the Warriors yesterday. Delon Wright missed a free throw. Then a 3-pointer. Then another 3-pointer. Jevon Carter missed a 3-pointer. Julian Washburn missed a 3-pointer. Carter missed a shorter shorter jumper.

Finally, Andrew Bogut mercifully ended the spectacle with a defensive rebound.

Watch the possession in all its glory.

Grizzlies doing fairly well for team in self-imposed holding pattern

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

As I’ve written repeatedly: The Grizzlies’ insistence in trying to win immediately with Marc Gasol and Mike Conley is likely to yield unfulfilling results in the present and leave Memphis less prepared for the future. This Western Conference is so unforgiving, the Grizzlies are are longshots just to make the playoffs, let alone advance. But they should also be good enough to miss out on a high drat pick in what appears to be a top-heavy draft. An expensive roster and unwillingness to pay the luxury tax leave little flexibility.

But in that context, Memphis added plenty of short- and long-term talent this offseason.

The Grizzlies used every mechanism available – draft, free agency and trade. The haul: Jaren Jackson Jr., Kyle Anderson, Garrett Temple, Omri Casspi, Jevon Carter.

Memphis did well to pick Jackson No. 3 despite his initial reluctance and unclear fit with Gasol. Jackson came around on the Grizzlies, and he was too talented to pass up. Though he’ll probably play center in the long run, he might begin his career at power forward due to strength concerns.

Carter provided solid value high in the second round. Unfortunately, Memphis could sign him to just a two-year deal, limiting upside on the value he’ll provide.

Anderson, signed to a mid-level offer sheet the Spurs didn’t match, is darned productive. His lack of athleticism will limit him in some matchups, but he should provide value on this deal.

Even after a lost year with the Warriors, Casspi is not far removed from productiveness. A minimum contract is worth finding out whether he can return to form.

The second-rounder surrendered to get Temple is not insignificant, but the Grizzlies cleared a roster crunch by dealing Ben McLemore and Deyonta Davis – both of whom seemed to run their course in Memphis – to the Kings. Temple should help the Grizzlies on the wing.

It wasn’t all gains for Memphis. The Grizzlies lost Tyreke Evans (to the Pacers), but that was less about this offseason and more the predictable outcome of last year’s failed trade deadline. Evans was so good in Memphis last season. He’ll be missed if this team is still trying to compete.

The Grizzlies also missed an opportunity to conduct an open coaching search, keeping interim J.B. Bickerstaff. I’m not as down on retaining him as I am the process behind it.

Ultimately, I’m just not sure where all these additions get Memphis. At least Jackson and Anderson will be around for years. They might finally provide a roadmap to a post-Gasol-Conley future while still helping in the interim.

But it’ll still be a while for that vision to come to fruition, if the Grizzlies ever execute a next step.

Offseason grade: B-

NBA rookies agree on little, but Trae Young’s shooting and playmaking supremacy comes closest

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You might see stories today about Bulls center Wendell Carter Jr.‘s peers picking him to have the best career among this rookie class. After all, he was the top vote-getter in that category in the NBA’s annual rookie survey.

But 87% of polled rookies chose someone else. That Carter’s 13% of votes led means only so much.

That was the story throughout the survey.

The leaders for predicted Rookie of the Year (tie between Suns’ Deandre Ayton and Cavaliers’ Collin Sexton), biggest steal based on where he was drafted (Timberwolves’ Keita Bates-Diop), most athletic (76ers’ Zhaire Smith) and best defender (Grizzlies’ Jevon Carter) each received less than 30% of the vote in their category. In other words, more than two-thirds of polled players picked a rookie other than the leader in each category.

The exceptions: best shooter (Hawks’ Trae Young at 47%) and best playmaker (Young at 35%). But even he didn’t get a majority of votes. Still, I appreciate many of his peers recognizing his passing ability. That’s his best skill, not the deep shooting that draws so much attention.

Grizzlies sign Shelvin Mack as veteran backup point guard

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The Memphis Grizzlies are betting on a big season to come from Mike Conley at the point. Back from missing almost all of last season (primarily due to a sore Achilles), he will need to be both healthy and play at near an All-Star level for Memphis to reach its playoff goals.

Now the Grizzlies have added a little veteran depth behind him in Shelvin Mack, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN.

Mack started slowly but found his role last season in Orlando and was for the Magic what he was for the Jazz and others before — a solid, role-playing backup point guard a coach can trust. He’s a good floor general, works hard on defense, is not a great shooter but hit a respectable 34.5 percent from three last season.

The Grizzlies have Andrew Harrison (on a non-guaranteed contract) and rookie Jevon Carter also at the point.