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Three Things to Know: Butler who? Derrick Rose drops career-high 50

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Derrick Rose drops 50 helping everyone forget about the Jimmy Butler nightmare for a while. We can all use a good distraction once in a while — and nobody could use a distraction like Timberwolves fans. They spent their day learning that Jimmy Butler was not going to play against the Jazz that night because he wanted to send a message about trading him… or, he’s just sore and needed a night off. Whichever. The Timberwolves are still Chaos.

Then Derrick Rose took the court.

With Butler and point guard Jeff Teague both out, Rose was thrust into the role of starter and primary ball handler. It was his night from the start — 13 points on 4-of-6 shooting plus two assists in the first quarter alone — and it kept piling up. Rose hit the go-ahead shot for the Timberwolves with :30 seconds left, then sealed the game with :13 seconds remaining, hitting a couple of free throws.

Rose finished with 50 points on 19-of-31 shooting, including 4-of-7 from three.

He was hitting from everywhere — at the rim, midrange, and from three.

After the game, it was an emotional Rose who talked about his long journey — an ACL surgery, two meniscus surgeries —  and how he could have easily walked away from basketball kept fighting because he loved the game and just wanted to play.

That’s a story everyone can get behind.

For a night, until the chaos of the Jimmy Butler situation returns.

2) Shot of the night: Paul Millsap hits putback jumper to get Nuggets a win in OT. Give the Chicago Bulls credit, they played one of the five best teams in the NBA to start the season to a standstill, forcing overtime. Zach LaVine continues to light it up this season with 28 points and rookie Wendell Carter Jr. added a career-high 25.

It was just a point short. In overtime, Denver was down a point with 3.5 seconds left, they got the ball to their star Nikola Jokic who got a pretty clean look at a 19-footer and back rimmed it, but Paul Millsap was there.

Denver is 6-1 on the season

3) This time, LeBron James gets bailed out by a veteran two guard making a mistake. The Lakers had this, a 14-point lead with four minutes to go in the game, they just had to close out the Dallas Mavericks on the road with a couple of buckets and a couple of stops…

And it’s never that easy for the Lakers. Los Angeles didn’t score a field goal the final 4:15 of the game and were just 3-of-6 from the free throw line. A Luka Doncic drive and baseline eight-foot fadeaway tied the game at 113-113 with seven seconds left. The Lakers gave the ball to LeBron, who brought it up and… Wesley Matthews fouls him on the dribble 35 feet from the basket. The Lakers were in the bonus, LeBron got two free throws with :02 seconds left, hits the second and ballgame. Lakers win, 114-113. Matthews foul led to a lot of these memes on NBA Twitter, because why would you foul that far from the basket unless you thought you had a foul to give?

Matthews said after the game he knew the Mavericks didn’t have a foul to give, but he was trying to be aggressive and make a play, to force a turnover. He also admitted it was not a smart move.

Either way, LeBron and the now 3-5 Lakers will take it. Also, all of that paled in comparison to JaVale McGee talking to the media after the game in a custom-made, full-size Grinch costume.

Timberwolves in turmoil

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

The Timberwolves won 47 games and ended a 13-year playoff drought last season, and their core group returns. Few teams can match the 1-2 star power of Jimmy Butler and Karl-Anthony Towns. Jeff Teague and Taj Gibson are strong complementary pieces, and Andrew Wiggins has the tools to excel.

But it feels like Minnesota was decimated by a meteorite this offseason.

Butler’s unsatisfied trade request casts a shadow over the upcoming season. It has shined a spotlight on the discord permeating through this organization in so many directions – Butler and Wiggins, Butler and Towns, Towns and Tom Thibodeau, Tom Thibodeau and Glen Taylor.

Maybe Butler and Thibodeau can thrive in this chaotic, energetic, intense environment. It seems the weight of it could crush everyone else, though.

This all reflects terribly on Thibodeau, who let the Butler situation linger over the summer. Chemistry matters, and an unhappy Butler trying to torment Towns and Wiggins into playing with more fire could just burn everyone involved. It was bad enough last year when the young players thought Butler could be there a while. If they expect him to leave next summer in free agency, will they just tune him out until then? If that happens, will Butler become even harder on them? This could get ugly in a hurry.

That said, it’s not as if Minnesota had great chemistry last season, either. This is still such a talented team. Heck, even if the Timberwolves trade Butler by the trade deadline, he might first help them stack enough wins to make the playoffs. Hope isn’t lost.

Most importantly, Minnesota locked up Towns to a long-term extension. No matter what happens with Butler, the 22-year-old star is staying a while.

The Timberwolves also did tinkering to help over the summer. Signing Derrick Rose and Luol Deng, two ex-Bulls, will generate plenty of laughs, but those two for the minimum is fine. So was drafting Josh Okogie No. 20 and Keita Bates-Diop No. 48.

Minnesota’s biggest signing was Anthony Tolliver for one year, $5.75 million – which, to stay under the luxury-tax line, required letting Nemanja Bjelica go. I considered Tolliver an upgrade as the Timberwolves’ stretch four, though part of that calculation considered Tolliver’s positive effect in the locker room.

In that area, it might be too little, too late.

Offseason grade: D   

Report: Timberwolves, Heat were making ‘significant progress’ on Jimmy Butler trade until Minnesota changed proposal

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We’ve learned a little about what the Heat are offering for Jimmy ButlerGoran Dragic and/or Hassan Whiteside, but not Josh Richardson or Bam Adebayo. With Miami Butler’s reported preferred destination, the Heat have additional incentive to trade for him, as they’ll have a better chance of re-signing him this summer.

Will Miami complete a deal for Butler?

Marc Stein of The New York Times:

This will only fuel skepticism about Timberwolves president Tom Thibodeau actually trading Butler. The quick (and fun) assumption: Thibodeau sabotaged negotiations so he could keep his star player.

But I’m always leery of these reports. One team’s ‘significant progress’ isn’t necessarily the other team’s. Minnesota might have never viewed talks as gaining traction.

Especially without including Richardson or Adebayo, it’s hard to see the Heat making a compelling offer. Butler is far more valuable than Dragic, and Dragic is only a marginal upgrade over Timberwolves point guard Jeff Teague. Miami shopped Whiteside earlier in the offseason without finding positive value for him.

Both Butler and rival teams have incentive to paint Minnesota’s front office as unreasonable. They want Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor – by no means a basketball expert – to step in and trade Butler himself, presumably for less return and more quickly than Thibodeau would do.

So, consider the idea Minnesota’s front office is being overly difficult. It’s certainly possible. But don’t blindly accept it, either.

Here are players Heat, Rockets and Bucks reportedly offering for Jimmy Butler

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The Timberwolves have reportedly offered Jimmy Butler to the 76ers for Ben Simmons and Bucks for Khris Middleton, getting rejected both times.

But what kind of offers is Minnesota getting for the disgruntled star? The Rockets and Heat (with evident limitations) are interested, and apparently the Timberwolves’ request didn’t scare off Milwaukee like it did Philadelphia.

Darren Wolfson of 1500 ESPN:

My understanding is from talking to numerous league officials, league sources, front-office folks, a coach – actually, a couple coaching sources – that the Wolves have all the parameters of the deals that they can make. So, it’s on the Wolves at some point here to say yes.

Now, do they wait a little bit longer just to see if some team adds a player in – like Miami? Miami is not willing to move Josh Richardson, but in the end, do they offer Josh Richardson?

But, so far, as of October 2nd, no sense whatsoever that Miami is making Josh Richardson available. Same goes for Bam Adebayo. Is Goran Dragic available? Yeah. The Wolves could acquire Goran Dragic. Is Hassan Whiteside available? Yeah, the Wolves could acquire Hassan Whiteside.

From Houston, you can get Eric Gordon. You can get P.J. Tucker. The Rockets want Jimmy Butler.

The Bucks are willing to move Brogdon, Bledsoe. The Bucks still have interest in Jimmy Butler. They’re not willing to move Middleton.

The Clippers are also still very, very interested in Jimmy Butler.

Now, league folks still say keep an eye on Miami, that Miami wants him the most. He wants to be in Miami – not that the Wolves care about that, but hey, if he wants to be in Miami, and Miami wants him, that eventually you can find some sort of happy medium, find a way to complete a trade.

It’s unclear whether each team mentioned is offering both the named players in proposals or only one per proposal.

Eric Bledsoe and Malcolm Brogdon for Butler would work salary-cap-wise. But there would be diminishing returns for the Bucks dealing their best two point guards, leaving the position to Matthew Dellavedova, and Minnesota adding two point guards to a roster that already has Jeff Teague, Tyus Jones and Derrick Rose. This also just isn’t enough value for the Timberwolves.

Gordon and Tucker for Butler would also work cap-wise. That trade could be the most sensible, especially if Tom Thibodeau prioritizes the present.

Dragic and Whiteside for Butler would not work cap-wise, though Butler could be traded straight up for either Miami player. But neither Whiteside nor Dragic is nearly as valuable as Butler.

However, it’s difficult to evaluate these offers without knowing the exact parameters. Are other players involved? Picks? This information is interesting, but limited.

Mostly, though, it points to the Timberwolves not receiving enough value for Butler in an offer yet.

Five players most likely to be traded this season

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Jimmy Butler, Timberwolves

Even with all the reported issues in negotiation between Minnesota and other teams, Butler must make this list. He wants out, and Tom Thibodeau at least said he’d honor Butler’s trade request. It’s unclear precisely what Thibodeau means by that, but Timberwolves owner Glen Taylor could always get involved, and he’s more likely to deal Butler.

In the interest of variety, the rest of this list will ignore players with heightened trade alerts simply due to Butler’s availability. Minnesota could use this as a method to unload Gorgui Dieng. The Timberwolves could get another point guard then deal Jeff Teague or Tyus Jones. The Heat are reportedly talking about trading Justise Winslow, Goran Dragic and/or Josh Richardson for Butler.

Kyle Korver, Cavaliers

Even after losing LeBron James, Cleveland is trying to maintain perception of legitimacy. That could mean trading the 37-year-old Korver to a winner. He’s still a dangerous 3-point shooter, and his contract – $7.56 million salary this season, $3.44 million of $7.5 million guaranteed next season – is quite manageable. The Cavs could see trading Korver to a contender as doing right by him, a move that would be respected around the league. And they’d get positive assets for a player extremely unlikely to contribute to their next winning team.

Marquese Chriss, Rockets

Chriss just got traded from the Suns to Houston, but don’t assume he’ll stick there all season. Rockets general manager Daryl Morey loves to wheel and deal and is especially willing to shuffle players during the season. There’s probably a place for Chriss to develop his tools in the NBA, but it might not be on a championship contender. The 21-year-old has looked so far from understanding the game well enough to help at the highest levels. If he shines with the Rockets early, they could trade him for someone more experienced and dependable. If he doesn’t play well (or maybe even if he does), Houston might just want to unload his $3,206,160 salary considering his the luxury-tax hit.

Courtney Lee, Knicks

Lee denies he wants to be traded, but he can still see the writing on the wall: He no longer fits in New York. The Knicks are rebuilding and eying 2019 free agency. Lee is 32 and due $12,759,670 in 2019-20. That salary might make Lee difficult to move, but he can still play. Plenty of teams can use another 3-and-D wing.

Dewayne Dedmon, Hawks

Dedmon is a helpful player on an expiring ($7.2 million ) contract who’s stuck on a bad team – usually a set of factors that lead to a trade. But few good teams need a center, so his market is more limited. Dedmon’s combination of production and salary give him an edge in trade likelihood over other centers on expiring contracts on bad teams: Magic’s Nikola Vucevic, Bulls’ Robin Lopez, Kings’ Kosta Koufos. Atlanta also already has John Collins, Omari Spellman and Alex Len. The Hawks should want to get what they can for Dedmon then give more playing time to those younger bigs.