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Grizzlies doing fairly well for team in self-imposed holding pattern

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

As I’ve written repeatedly: The Grizzlies’ insistence in trying to win immediately with Marc Gasol and Mike Conley is likely to yield unfulfilling results in the present and leave Memphis less prepared for the future. This Western Conference is so unforgiving, the Grizzlies are are longshots just to make the playoffs, let alone advance. But they should also be good enough to miss out on a high drat pick in what appears to be a top-heavy draft. An expensive roster and unwillingness to pay the luxury tax leave little flexibility.

But in that context, Memphis added plenty of short- and long-term talent this offseason.

The Grizzlies used every mechanism available – draft, free agency and trade. The haul: Jaren Jackson Jr., Kyle Anderson, Garrett Temple, Omri Casspi, Jevon Carter.

Memphis did well to pick Jackson No. 3 despite his initial reluctance and unclear fit with Gasol. Jackson came around on the Grizzlies, and he was too talented to pass up. Though he’ll probably play center in the long run, he might begin his career at power forward due to strength concerns.

Carter provided solid value high in the second round. Unfortunately, Memphis could sign him to just a two-year deal, limiting upside on the value he’ll provide.

Anderson, signed to a mid-level offer sheet the Spurs didn’t match, is darned productive. His lack of athleticism will limit him in some matchups, but he should provide value on this deal.

Even after a lost year with the Warriors, Casspi is not far removed from productiveness. A minimum contract is worth finding out whether he can return to form.

The second-rounder surrendered to get Temple is not insignificant, but the Grizzlies cleared a roster crunch by dealing Ben McLemore and Deyonta Davis – both of whom seemed to run their course in Memphis – to the Kings. Temple should help the Grizzlies on the wing.

It wasn’t all gains for Memphis. The Grizzlies lost Tyreke Evans (to the Pacers), but that was less about this offseason and more the predictable outcome of last year’s failed trade deadline. Evans was so good in Memphis last season. He’ll be missed if this team is still trying to compete.

The Grizzlies also missed an opportunity to conduct an open coaching search, keeping interim J.B. Bickerstaff. I’m not as down on retaining him as I am the process behind it.

Ultimately, I’m just not sure where all these additions get Memphis. At least Jackson and Anderson will be around for years. They might finally provide a roadmap to a post-Gasol-Conley future while still helping in the interim.

But it’ll still be a while for that vision to come to fruition, if the Grizzlies ever execute a next step.

Offseason grade: B-

Lakers’ Josh Hart wins Summer League MVP

Associated Press
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The Lakers wanted to test Josh Hart this summer: What would happen if they gave him a more substantial role? He was solid as a backup point guard last season (a good showing for a rookie), averaging 7.9 points per game and shooting 39.6 percent from three, but with Lonzo Ball and Rajon Rondo in the fold point guard minutes will be hard to come by next season.

What happened if they put the ball in Hart’s hands and made him the leader of a team on and off the court?

Hart responded by winning the NBA Las Vega Summer League MVP, averaging 24.2 points a game and leading the Lakers to the championship game. He dropped 37 on the Cavaliers and Collin Sexton in the semi-finals.

The award was announced Tuesday, in advance of the title contest between Hart and his Lakers vs. the Portland Trail Blazers.

Hart is the second Laker in a row to win the award, last year Lonzo Ball won it in leading the Lakers to a Summer League crown.

It’s an honor, but don’t assume Summer League MVP means NBA success. Sure, Damian Lillard won the award, but he was co-MVP with Josh Shelby. Glen Rice III won the award. The MVP list includes Kyle Anderson and Tyus Jones and other good but not All-Star players.

Hart also made the All-NBA Summer League first team. (Both the MVP award and All-NBA Summer League teams were voted on by a select media pannel.)

Here are the Las Vegas All Summer League teams:

All-NBA Summer League First Team

Wendell Carter Jr. (Chicago)
Josh Hart (Los Angeles Lakers)
Kevin Knox (New York)
Collin Sexton (Cleveland)
Christian Wood (Milwaukee)

MGM Resorts All-NBA Summer League Second Team

Deandre Ayton (Phoenix)
Wade Baldwin IV (Portland)
Jaren Jackson Jr. (Memphis)
Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (Los Angeles Lakers)
Trae Young (Atlanta)

Report: Kings get Ben McLemore back in trade with Grizzlies

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Since the NBA instituted a four-year rookie scale for first-rounders in 1998, just 22 top-10 picks spent their entire rookie-scale contract with their original team then left that team in free agency.

Many stayed on their first team long-term. Others got traded while teams were still intrigued by the talent that got the player drafted so high in the first place. Some were signed-and-traded, the threat of restricted free agency giving teams one last chance to recoup value from a high pick.

There’s a certain stagnancy with a player’s development and a team’s decision-making when a team drafts someone high, holds him for his entire rookie-scale contract then just watches him leave in his first free agency.

Former No. 2 pick Jabari Parker is an atypical example of that rare situation, as he was picked especially high before the Bucks let his value drain until he signed with the Bulls last week.

Ben McLemore is far more representative.

The Kings drafted him No. 7 in 2013, and his production oscillated between degrees of poor. Sacramento explored trading him numerous times, but never pulled the trigger. The Kings didn’t even extend him a qualifying offer last summer, and he signed with the Grizzlies.

It was a failure of development by McLemore and foresight by Sacramento. The Kings clearly just never figured what to do with McLemore – which makes this trade, oh, so special.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Chris Herrington of The Daily Memphian:

To be fair to the Kings, maybe this isn’t about McLemore at all. He could just be a salary for matching purposes, the player receiving it completely irrelevant.

All three traded players are on expiring contracts. All three are overpaid based on their production. Temple is the best and highest-paid player in the deal. Davis and McLemore have better chances of helping Sacramento win meaningfully.

The Kings, generously, have minimal chance of winning a satisfactorily next season. Temple wasn’t going to change that, and at 32, he had little chance of helping once Sacramento was ready.

McLemore is a longshot to ever become an effective rotation player, but he has the requisite size and athleticism for an NBA shooting guard, and he’s not old at age 25. The 21-year-old Davis is far more intriguing as a bouncy center, but he must make major strides in effort and awareness.

Even as low-odds bets, Davis and McLemore offer more to Sacramento than Temple did. The second-rounder and cash only improve the Kings’ return.

Sacramento also opens $995,049 in additional cap space. Could that go toward signing another restricted free agent to an offer sheet after the Bulls matched Zach LaVine‘s? Marcus Smart? Rodney Hood? Clint Capela?

Temple is the biggest winner of the trade. He opted in for $8 million next season, even though that meant committing to the lowly Kings. But now he gets his money and gets to join a better team. He might even start at shooting guard in Memphis. Temple is a fine player and an upgrade for the wing-hungry Grizzlies. But he’s also 32 and showed slippage last year. Memphis hopes a change in scenery will solve that and it wasn’t simply aging.

The Grizzlies were wise to bet on Temple considering the low cost of acquiring him. They’re trying to win now, which isn’t necessarily the wrong move with Marc Gasol and Mike Conley under contract. It’ll still be an uphill battle in the loaded West, but Temple is another helpful addition along with Jaren Jackson Jr., Kyle Anderson, Omri Casspi and Jevon Carter this summer.

Top 10 standout players from NBA Summer League

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LAS VEGAS — For NBA teams, Summer League is less about whether a young player is good or not, and far more about benchmarking where they are and seeing what areas that player needs to work on going forward. It’s a first step.

But some of those first steps are more impressive than others.

After watching a dozen days of Summer League games — in person in both Salt Lake City and Las Vegas — here are 10 players who stood out to me. This list is not all-inclusive by any means — Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Grayson Allen, and Trae Young would get an honorable mention here — nor is it just a list of the best players I have seen. Instead, this is a list of players that turned my head, or those of scouts/team executives that I spoke with, because of their success and what they have shown in Summer League. It’s a list of guys who caught my eye.

Here is my Top 10 for 2018:

1) Jaren Jackson Jr. (Memphis Grizzlies). From the minute he stepped on the court in Salt Lake, he looked like the future of the NBA five — he can drain threes, runs the court, is strong and physical inside, and can get up and block shots. In Utah he averaged 15.7 points per game and five boards a night. Interestingly, through much the summer games the Grizzlies tried to pair him with a true center, seemingly getting him used to playing the four next to Marc Gasol come next season. Jackson looked a little tired and struggled some in Las Vegas — especially the night he battled Jonathan Isaac and Mohamed Bamba on his fifth game in seven days — but he worked hard and still made plays. The Grizzlies may have something special with him.

2) John Collins (Atlanta Hawks). Everyone already knew he was  good — he made NBA All-Rookie second team and averaged 10.5 points and 7.3 rebounds a game shooting 57.6 percent last season. However, after watching in Las Vegas and Salt Lake, he has shown the potential to be a future star, his game is improving. He’s averaging 24 points and 8 boards a game in Vegas, playing good defense in the paint, but more importantly he has shown improved three-point stroke and handles. He’s done for the summer, but in limited games he showed he should be on this list.

3) Deandre Ayton (Phoenix Suns). Yes, the No. 1 pick should be good, but he has looked like a man among boys going up against some of the other rookie big men in Las Vegas. Ayton pushed Bamba around all game long, for example. He’s averaging 16 points a game on 67 percent shooting, plus 11 boards a contest, and he’s got versatility to his game. There’s work to do on defense and passing, but he has the potential to be special.

4) Kevin Knox (New York Knicks). He’s looked like a rookie at points, he’s blown everyone’s doors off at others. Tuesday’s game against the Lakers was the perfect example: He started 0-of-6 from the floor and finished the night with seven turnovers. He’s got work to do. However, he finished that Laker game with 22 points and was 5-of-7 from three, he’s got the athleticism to get by guys with a first step and he can finish. And he’s just 18. The Knicks may have another crucial rebuilding block with Knox.

5) Jonathan Isaac (Orlando Magic). He was a roll of the dice at No. 6 in the 2017 draft, a guy with a lot of potential but a project, then he missed most of his rookie season with injuries. Nobody seemed exactly sure what Orlando had. In Vegas he has turned heads with his play —14.3 points and 7 boards a game, he’s physically a lot stronger and his shooting stroke is smooth. He has banged inside and held his own with Memphis’ Jackson, and has just been a better athlete than everyone he’s gone up against. Pair him along the front with Bamba and Aaron Gordon, and that is an interesting team in Orlando. And when was the last time we said that?

6) Josh Hart (Los Angeles Lakers). He might be the MVP of Summer League so far, averaging 23.3 points per game and just running the team like a pro. Which he is — he showed he could do this with the Lakers last season, but asked to take on more of a scoring role in Vegas he has stepped up. Bottom line, there’s a reason every time a team talks to the Lakers about a trade they want Hart thrown in the mix. He’s got a lot of fans around the league, and that has only grown this summer.

7) Wendell Carter Jr. (Chicago Bulls). I will own it: I was not high on Carter Jr. coming into the draft, but he has impressed in Las Vegas. As expected, he has a versatile and polished offensive game with a nearly unstoppable turnaround from the post, ability to score with either hand, range on his jumper, plus he is a surprisingly good passer. The book on him coming into the draft was defensive questions, but he has been better on that front than expected — he works hard and is athletic enough to be disruptive. We will see how he fares against NBA-level competition on that end, but the work ethic and tools are there.

8) Harry Giles (Sacramento Kings). He was a low-risk gamble pick by the Kings at No. 20 in 2017, a guy who was maybe the top player in his class as a high school sophomore until the injuries hit (ACL, MCL and a meniscus tear in his left knee, plus another surgery on his right knee). The Kings took him and red-shirted him last season, but in Vegas he has been impressive and solid (12 points and 7 rebounds a game in Sin City). He looks like he could be a rotation NBA big man (at least, the Kings think he can be more than that), someone Sacramento can count on besides Marvin Bagley III. Giles has been a pleasant surprise.

9) Jordan Bell (Golden State Warriors). He’s only on this list for one reason. Yes, he’s looked good in limited Summer League run — the guy was playing serious minutes in the NBA Finals a month ago, of course he looks good going against a bunch of non-NBA players. What got him there was this one moment against the Jazz.

(To be clear, Bell and Donovan Mitchell are tight, and Mitchell thought this was funny.)

10) De'Anthony Melton (Houston Rockets). He could end up being a second-round steal for the Rockets. Melton didn’t play last season at USC (he was the guy at the heart of the FBI probe) so he slid down to 46th overall. In Vegas he has looked like a quality rotation guard, averaging 16.3 points, 7 rebounds, and 2.7 steals a game. Guard minutes are tight to come by on the Rockets this season, but he’s going to make the opening night roster and will get his shot.

NBA Summer League notes from Salt Lake City

Associated Press
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SALT LAKE CITY — The NBA’s official, all 30 teams are there, Summer League kicks off Friday in sweltering Las Vegas. But before that buffet of games, there are a couple appetizer Summer Leagues, ones that are a little smaller but packed with intrigue of their own.

I’ve been in Salt Lake for the Utah Summer League the last few days, here are some of my notes from the previous 48 hours:

Trae Young has a lot of work in front of him. A lot of development to do. The No. 5 pick came in hyped by fans and some scouts, but just watching him through two games it’s clear he has a lot of fundamental things he needs to do better before he can start to live up to anything near those lofty expectations.

It’s not the 2-of-16 from three for two games that is the most concerning, he’s a better shooter than that, but rather his need overall to adapt to the speed, length and athleticism of the NBA game. His shot seems rushed, and come October the defenders he will see nightly are better than the guys here (with all due respect to Javon Carter and Derrick White). Young has to both get stronger and learn how to better use his body to create space to get off his shot on drives. He needs to find a comfort level with the pace and the pressure.

He can get there, he made adjustments in these games, but after watching his first couple of days it’s clear he has a long way to go.

The Hawks praised his decision making and Young echoed that.

“For me the biggest thing is he’s making the right plays,” coach Lloyd Pierce said. “There were a ton of possessions last night where he made the right play. There were a ton of possessions tonight where he made the right play.”

“My main thing is right now to make the right plays,” Young said. “The rest of the team isn’t knocking down shots that we’re going to eventually hit. I’m excited we’re getting the looks we’re getting, we’re just not knocking down shots right now. Eventually, it will come, and when it does it will come fast.”

The shots will come. The additional games in Las Vegas will help Young. But like the rebuilding Hawks team, there is a lot of development, a lot of work to do before the results they want start to show.

• A year in the Spurs’ development system has been good to Derrick White — the combo guard spent much of last season in the G-League, with some cups of coffee (139 total minutes) with the big club. In Utah he looked like he deserved more, he has improved considerably in the past year. Last summer the speed and athleticism of the other players seemed to have him second-guessing himself. No more.

Tuesday night he was 7-of-15 from the floor with 21 points plus had nine assists. He’s been strong in both of their games in Utah.

“Derrick is a good basketball player,” said Spurs Summer League coach Will Hardy. “We’re trying not to pigeonhole him as a one or a two. He can play off the ball as a two. I think tonight we saw he can handle the ball, Atlanta pressed and trapped for the majority of the second half and Derrick was our primary handler. I think that makes him unique. He’s got sort of an old-school feel to his game in the sense he’s just a good backcourt player, and that gives him some versatility because he can play with a lot of different guys.”

White, the No. 29 pick of the Spurs in the 2017 draft, is a story of overcoming expectations. Out of high school he had no D1 college offers and just one at D2, but he grew five inches at D2 school and eventually transferred to Colorado, only to make first team all Pac-12. As a 23-year-old draftee teams were concerned before the draft about how much he could improve, but this year at Summer League the answer has been “plenty.”

We could be seeing more of him in the fall.

• We had our first coach’s challenge of Summer League — Lloyd Pierce of the Hawks challenged a clear path foul in the first game Tuesday. Sure, his team was down 16 points with 1:31 left, but it was a coach’s challenge.

He lost it. Pierce currently has the worst record in the NBA in coach’s challenges (at 0-1, but still).

Jaren Jackson Jr. is going to be very good. Yes, it’s two Summer League games and those matter about as much as the points on “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” but his shooting stroke, handles, and shot blocking are a great combo in the modern NBA. Through two games he’s scored 39 points, shot 10-of-17 from three, and has been the best rookie in Utah. And it’s not just the threes that impress.

Tuesday’s second game was closer to what we can expect of him most nights — 10 points, eight rebounds and a couple of blocks, including one down the stretch of the game that was athletic and helped preserve the Grizzlies win.

“He’s a defensive-minded player and he’s an extremely talented player,” Grizzlies Summer League Coach J.J. Outlaw said. “Defense travels. You’re not always going to have your jumper, you’re not always going to be able to score points, but he was able to help us out and make some plays defensively.”

Like every rookie, there is a lot of development work ahead for Jackson, but in his case you can quickly see where he fits in the modern NBA.

• Both Grayson Allen of the Jazz and Lonnie Walker IV did not play in their teams’ second games on Tuesday for rest.

• Javon Carter is making fans. The hustle guys who defend in Summer League games — which are stylistically glorified pickup games — stand out, and that is what Carter has done. In the first game he was one of the reasons Trae Young started 0-of-10 from three, Carter was in his grill and taking away Young’s air (on some shots, others Young just mixed).

I don’t know how things will work for Carter when the skill and athleticism levels jump in the fall, he struggled at moments down the stretch against Utah when it got tight, but he is going to put in the work and you know Grizzlies coaches will want to keep a guy like that around.

• Great advice from Naz Mitrou-Long, the former Iowa State player who spent most of last season in the G-League (and dropped 19 points with eight assists Tuesday night), had some fantastic advice for other rookies looking to make an impression in Summer League:

“If you come here and take every single shot when the ball touches your hands, it’s not going to benefit you. I know I personally came in here last year thinking ‘I need to average 30 in this thing’ but nobody does that, and it’s for a reason. You’re playing high-level talent. Find out what your organization wants, find out the right way to play basketball and do that. Max out your potential in your role.”

• The Utah Summer League is the kind of experience was old school in a good way. It was small, intimate, with a couple of games a day and a chance for fans to get closer to players — and the NBA guys who show up to watch — than happens in Las Vegas now.

Also a plus: A passionate, loud home crowd. Tickets are cheap ($8 for some in the lower bowl and that is for both games) so people turn out. Tuesday night the Jazz were getting blown out by 26 to the Grizzlies, but battled back to make it a game late (and even took a brief lead). The crowd was large and loud. They cared. That added an energy and passion to the game usually missing in other Summer Leagues.

Throw in that Salt Lake is a great city to visit — walkable downtown, impressive food scene — and I’m going to try to make it back if they keep doing this.