Kings select Marvin Bagley III with No. 2 overall pick in 2018 NBA Draft

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The Sacramento Kings have made a sensible pick in the 2018 NBA draft. After the Phoenix Suns selected DeAndre Ayton No. 1 overall, it was up to the Kings to do something that wouldn’t set their franchise back.

Despite rumors that Sacramento had began to favor Michael Porter Jr., on Thursday night. the Kings took Duke University standout Marvin Bagley III.

Adding Bagley to their rotation of young, switchable wing players was a solid move for Sacramento. Bagley measures in at 6-foot-11 and 234 pounds, making him a power forward for the Kings.. He will likely need to learn for a year behind veteran Zach Randolph, and should be an interesting addition to the frontcourt of Willie Cauley-Stein, Harry Giles, and Skal Labissiere.

The Phoenix, Arizona native was a scorer for the Blue Devils during his one year in college, nabbing ACC Player of the Year honors as a freshman while scoring 21 points per game.

The Kings have a slate of young guard prospects as well, including Buddy Hield, De’Aaron Fox, and Bogdan Bogdanovic.

Sacramento hasn’t won more than 35 games since the 2007-2008 season, and no doubt they are expecting that Bagley will add a scoring punch to their young core. More than anything, Sacramento needs this pick to go somewhat right as they continue to try to rebuild after the Isaiah Thomas / DeMarcus Cousins era.

Isaiah Thomas clowns Cavaliers on Jimmy Kimmel Live

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Well played, Isaiah Thomas.

They were having some fun on Jimmy Kimmel Live with Hall of Famer Isiah Thomas and former King/Celtic/Laker and soon-to-be free agent Isaiah Thomas, playing a game called “generation gap.” The elder Thomas was pretty good at it.

The younger Thomas… not so much. He was getting crushed. Which led to the line of the night.

You got to admit, that was pretty funny.

If you have the seven minutes, watch the whole skit, it’s pretty funny. And I couldn’t name a Real Housewife, either.

Isaiah Thomas wants Cavaliers to beat Warriors so he can get a ring

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Isaiah Thomas played a total of 15 games for the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2017-18 NBA season, a fact many of us may have blanked from our memories entirely.

Indeed, the NBA has improved its reputation this year for producing the most quality, crazy stories of any major American sports league. Thus Thomas, his hip, and the massive trade that sent half of the Cavaliers roster elsewhere at the trade deadline feels distant, not only in time but in importance to the season itself.

Thomas is a free agent this summer after spending the last half of the season with the Los Angeles Lakers, but that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have rooting interest as the NBA Finals get underway on Thursday night. The Cavaliers are meeting the Golden State Warriors in the Finals yet again, and Thomas is clearly on Cleveland’s side.

Via Instagram:

Of course, the context here is that Thomas is eligible for a championship ring if the Cavaliers are able to pull off the upset of the Warriors over the next few weeks.

We’re a long way from seeing Cleveland win another ring over Golden State, and we don’t know that the Cavaliers would even give Thomas a ring if they did win.

NBA Twitter got jokes, though.

LeBron James shouldering historic burden in carrying Cavaliers to NBA Finals

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As the Cavaliers were presented with the Eastern Conference championship trophy, LeBron James lied on the floor off to the side. Soon enough, Doris Burke – hosting the televised ceremony – beckoned him.

“I got to talk again?” said a clearly exhausted LeBron after leading Cleveland past the Pacers, Raptors and Celtics and into the NBA Finals.

His teammates helped him to his feet, and he returned the favor in his interview.

“I know I get a lot of the headlines – win, lose or draw, whatever the case may be,” LeBron said. “But in order to be successful, it’s a team game. I learned that from when I first started picking up a basketball to play organized basketball at age 9.”

That is true. No individual wins by himself.

But some do more than others, and LeBron is doing more than anyone in a long time.

He has put the Cavs on his back after failed trades, bad signings and aging (exacerbated by deep playoff runs annually) have left his supporting cast inept. His teammates are literally the butt of the joke.

The problems started last summer, when LeBron’s top teammate – Kyrie Irving – requested a trade. The Cavaliers dealt him for Isaiah Thomas and Jae Crowder, and when those two didn’t work, flipped them to get George Hill, Rodney Hood, Larry Nance Jr. and Jordan Clarkson. Though Cleveland also netted the No. 8 pick in that string of transactions (and relinquished its own first-rounder), that selection isn’t helping this postseason.

Neither are Dwyane Wade and Derrick Rose, two overhyped signings who were also sent away. J.R. Smith looks old. Tristan appears worn down.

Even the bright spots are blemished. Kevin Love is a star, but he has never neared his Minnesota-level contributions with the Cavs, and he’s not getting any younger. Plus, he’s still dealing with a concussion. Kyle Korver is a fine one-way player in a two-way sport. Jeff Green is finally providing surplus value – now that he’s earning a minimum salary. Jose Calderon has soared past expectations for someone who looked washed-up last year. Cedi Osman plays with a lot of energy but is deployed.

The other Cavaliers will have their moments, but so, so, so much falls on LeBron.

And he has risen to the occasion.

LeBron has posted 44% of Cleveland’s win shares this postseason. That’s the fifth-highest percentage ever for someone who led his team to the Finals and highest since the NBA-ABA merger.

The all-time leaderboard in percentage of team’s postseason win shares among players who led their team to the Finals:

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And here’s since the merger:

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Of course, win shares are far from a perfect measure. And these are all postseason-long marks. Perhaps, LeBron’s changes in the Finals.

But this matches what we’re all seeing unfold: LeBron is dragging an undermanned team deep in the playoffs.

The burden will probably become too great this round. The Warriors are stacked – Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant, Draymond Green and Klay Thompson.

One man can’t topple this Golden State team alone.

If LeBron’s teammates are as capable as he says, this would be a great time for them to step up.

He got them this far. Now, he needs more help.

Cavaliers make consecutive NBA Finals with unprecedented roster turnover between

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The Lakers got Wilt Chamberlain in 1968. The 76ers got Moses Malone in 1982. The Warriors got Kevin Durant in 2016.

And the Cavaliers lost Kyrie Irving in 2017.

It’s not uncommon for a team to be involved in star movement between back-to-back NBA Finals appearances. But teams good enough to make the Finals usually lure a star, not lose one.

Cleveland is the exception, dealing Irving to Boston after he requested a trade last summer. Not only did they lose half of LeBron James‘ supporting stars, the Cavs moved on from several other players who participated in their 2017 playoff run – Iman Shumpert, Deron Williams, Richard Jefferson, Channing Frye, Derrick Williams, Dahntay Jones and James Jones.

Yet, the Cavaliers are back in the Finals again.

Cleveland’s returning players account for just 62% of its postseason minutes the year prior. That’s the lowest mark for a returning finalist since the NBA began tracking minutes in 1952.

Only the Chamberlain-acquiring Lakers, Durant-acquiring Warriors and Malone-acquiring 76ers are even within shouting distance.

Here’s how every team to reach consecutive NBA Finals ranks in percentage of playoff minutes returned from the first year (counting only players who played in both postseasons):

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Though the Cavaliers already rank first in roster turnover, this method even underrates their transformation.

Since the 2017 Finals, Cleveland acquired, gave significant roles to then traded Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Dwyane Wade and Derrick Rose. None of those four factor into this calculation, but they obviously contribute heavily to the Cavs’ instability.

Irving counts, and he thrusted the Cavaliers into this historic situation.

Sure, the Lakers, 76ers and Warriors moved significant pieces to get Chamberlain, Malone and Durant. But those were clear upgrades and easy organizational decisions.

Irving chose to be traded far more than Cleveland chose to trade him. That decision sent the Cavs spiraling… but also wound up with them right back where they started.

If there’s a lesson in all this: No how matter how much surrounding chaos, LeBron wins the East.