Isaiah Thomas

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Wizards owner says John Wall ‘probably won’t play’ in 2019-20

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It was always likely that Washington Wizards star John Wall would be out for much of next year’s regular NBA season. The team has even filed for a disabled player exception for the 2019-20 season.

Now we have confirmation that the team is expecting Wall to miss significant time.

According to NBC Sports Washington’s Chase Hughes, Wizards owner Ted Leonsis has said that they are going to take things slow with Wall, and that he will miss serious time.

Via Twitter:

Washington is still trying to figure out what to do with Bradley Beal, and with Wall’s contract on the books, they don’t really have much of anywhere to go. The Wizards used their No. 9 overall pick on Rui Hachimura, which raised a few eyebrows.

But the team at least does have a GM in Tommy Sheppard, and they’ve made several hirings in the front office to try and out-think their competition. Washington has made a few moves, including trading for Davis Bertans and signing Isaiah Thomas.

Expect to see the Wizards at the bottom of the East next year. Still, that doesn’t mean they won’t be entertaining.

Kawhi Leonard, Paul George (Clippers), Kevin Durant, Kyrie Irving (Nets) form pop-up super teams

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Five years ago…

The Clippers were embroiled in Donald Sterling’s scandal. There was talk of players boycotting. The whole franchise seemed toxic.

The Nets were entering years of pain. They’d traded several future first-round picks for Kevin Garnett and Paul Pierce, who promptly declined and left the team in the basement. Brooklyn looked hopeless.

Suddenly, the Clippers and Nets are the NBA’s freshest powers after major offseason coups. Kawhi Leonard signed with the Clippers and convinced Paul George to request a trade to accompany him. Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving joined Brooklyn through free agency.

This level of star grouping in a single summer is unprecedented.

A team has added two reigning All-NBA players in the same offseason just three times:

  • 2019 Clippers: Kawhi Leonard and Paul George
  • 2019 Nets: Kevin Durant and Kyrie Irving
  • 2014 Cavaliers: LeBron James and Kevin Love

In 2014, LeBron returned home to Cleveland and pitched Love on joining him. The Cavs traded for Love with assurances he’d re-sign the following year.

The stories look similar in L.A. and Brooklyn this year.

Leonard wanted to return to his native Southern California, and he got George – another California native – to come along. Durant might resent the notion he was recruited, but playing near New Jersey is a homecoming for Irving. It seems Durant prioritized playing somewhere with Irving.

The big difference between this year’s situation and the Cavaliers in 2014: No incumbent star attracted Leonard, George, Durant and Irving to their new teams. Cleveland had Irving as a draw for LeBron and eventually Love.

The Clippers were starless. The Nets had no All-Star until D'Angelo Russell was named an injury replacement, and they weren’t keepinh him if landing Durant and Irving. (Russell got sent to the Warriors in a double sign-and-trade.)

That’s another way these situations are unprecedented.

Just eight teams have added multiple reigning All-Stars in the same offseason since the NBA-ABA merger. The preceding six already had an incumbent star who helped build the appeal:

Year Team Stars added Incumbent star
2019 LAC Kawhi Leonard, Paul George
2019 BRK Kevin Durant, Kyrie Irving
2017 OKC Paul George, Carmelo Anthony Russell Westbrook
2017 BOS Kyrie Irving, Gordon Hayward Isaiah Thomas*
2014 CLE LeBron James, Kevin Love Kyrie Irving
2012 LAL Dwight Howard, Steve Nash Kobe Bryant
2010 MIA LeBron James, Chris Bosh Dwyane Wade
2007 BOS Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen Paul Pierce**

*The Celtics traded Thomas for Irving, but Thomas was integral in recruiting Hayward in the first place.

**Pierce wasn’t an All-Star in 2007 due to an early injury, but he was an All-Star the five preceding and five following seasons and played like one while healthy later in 2006-07. Not counting him as a star in 2007 would be true only as a technicality.

Yet, Leonard and George chose to be the stars on the Clippers. Durant and Irving chose to be the stars on the Nets. They didn’t follow anyone already in place.

This is an unintended consequence of the shorter contracts owners pushed for. They give players more opportunities to change teams and value new situations like this. This is also a continuation of LeBron exercising his power, first by joining Wade and Bosh on the Heat then by closing up shop in Miami and forming a new super team in small-market Cleveland.

Maybe it can’t happen anywhere. It’s no coincidence the Clippers and Nets play in the two largest markets.

But the Lakers and Knicks are still the most prestigious franchises in Los Angeles and New York. The Clippers an Nets didn’t even win a playoff series or get one star first to lure others.

It’s a new era in the NBA – one where top talent is ready to come together and assert itself.

Wherever that may be.

Report: Isaiah Thomas to get his chance in Washington, agrees to one-year contract

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John Wall is sidelined, likely for all of next season, with a torn Achilles.

The point guards on the Wizards roster now are Ish Smith and Isaac Bonga. There are minutes to be had there.

Isaiah Thomas is going to get the chance to take them, reports Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN and confirmed by David Aldridge of The Athletic.

That almost certainly is for the veteran minimum.

But what it gives Thomas is a chance — which is all he wants. This was a man fifth in MVP voting just two seasons ago at the end of 2017, he was lined up for a massive payday, but hip surgeries and limited chances (behind Jamal Murray in Denver last season) have limited him to 44 games total over two seasons.

Washington may put the ball in Bradley Beal‘s hands a lot next season, and Smith can create, but that’s about it on the Wizards roster. Thomas used to be a great shot creator, he going to get an opportunity to prove he still is.

Thomas going to be a fan favorite, and a lot of people around the league will be rooting for him. We’ll see if he still has some magic in those shoes.

Rich Paul on Anthony Davis to Celtics: ‘They can trade for him, but it’ll be for one year’

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Anthony Davis reportedly wants to join the Lakers or Knicks. Not the Celtics.

The timing of Davis’ trade request – during the season, when the Celtics effectively couldn’t acquire him because Kyrie Irving was already their traded-for designated rookie scale player – was a transparent attempt to avoid Boston. Davis father said he didn’t want his son on the Celtics after how they treated Isaiah Thomas. A report emerged before the deadline Davis believed Irving might not re-sign with Boston, and the Celtics reportedly blamed Davis’ agent, Rich Paul, for planting the “cheap and underhanded” story.

After all that, Boston reportedly still wants to wants to trade for Davis and might have the goods to get him from the Pelicans.

So, Paul is still working to prevent it.

S.L. Price of Sports Illustrated:

Paul confirms that he has warned off Boston management.

“They can trade for him, but it’ll be for one year,” Paul says. “I mean: If the Celtics traded for Anthony Davis, we would go there and we would abide by our contractual [obligations] and we would go into free agency in 2020. I’ve stated that to them. But in the event that he decides to walk away and you give away assets? Don’t blame Rich Paul.”

I appreciate how often Paul has gone on record throughout this process, even getting Davis fined for the initial trade request. Many agents hide exclusively behind the cover of anonymity. Paul is repeatedly putting his name behind these statements.

(He probably often acts as an anonymous source, too. But clearly not always, which is enough to differentiate him.)

Davis won’t sign a contract extension with any team. It’s just financially imprudent. So, any team that trades for him carries the risk of losing him 2020 unrestricted free agency.

So, this is a matter of tone. Threatening to leave after his current contract is the only leverage Davis has in these trade talks. Boston – or any team – can still trade for him, but teams that feel less confident about him re-signing are dissuaded from offering New Orleans as much.

If he gets traded to the Celtics, I’d advise Davis to keep an open mind. Best case, he likes Boston more than he expects and discovers a place he wants to stay long-term – for more money than other teams can offer. Worst case, he follows through with his plan to test free agency. There’s no real downside.

In the meantime, Paul is doing all he can to get his client to a preferred destination. That’s the agent’s job.

It just sometimes gets messy and combative.

Cavs owner Dan Gilbert on Kyrie Irving trade: ‘We killed it in that trade’

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The Cleveland Cavaliers had no choice but to trade Kyrie Irving back in 2017. Irving asked to be moved, and if he hadn’t been there were threats of knee surgery that would have sidelined him much or all of the next season (he didn’t get that surgery, but then missed the 2018 NBA playoffs due to those knee issues).

The trade they took was with Boston: Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Ante Zizic, a 2018 1st round draft pick (which became Collin Sexton) and eventually a 2020 2nd round pick. At the time that didn’t seem bad because we didn’t yet grasp the severity of Thomas’s hip surgery — but the Celtics did. Once Cleveland’s doctors got a look at Thomas the trade was put on hold until more compensation was added, which proved to be the second-round pick.

Looking back now, the Cavaliers didn’t fare well, with all due respect to Sexton (who made the All-Rookie second team). Although that’s to be expected, nobody gets equal value back when trading a superstar.

That’s not how Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert sees it, speaking to the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

“I don’t know, but I think Kyrie will leave Boston,” said Gilbert. “We could have ended up with nothing. Looking back after all the moves Koby made, we killed it in that trade.”

“Killed it?” I didn’t think the kind of stuff Gilbert must be on was legalized in Ohio yet.

This is a matter of semantics. Was it about as good a deal as GM Koby Altman was going to find at the time? Yes. Again, at the time we thought Thomas would return midway through the next season and be closer to the guy who was fifth in MVP voting the season before than the guy we ended up seeing (which is still a sad story, hopefully Thomas can get back to being a contributor next season somewhere). Crowder was in the rotation on a team that went back to the NBA Finals. Sexton showed some promise as a rookie, maybe not as much as some Cavaliers fans think but he can play.

But “killed it?” To quote the great Inigo Montoya, “You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.”