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Report: Iman Shumpert opts into $11 million for next season

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This is as big a surprise as Guy Fieri being annoying.

Iman Shumpert played just 14 games last season due to knee surgery and was shipped out of Cleveland at the trade deadline to Sacramento as part of the Cavaliers’ midseason revamp. To put Shumpert’s value on the open market into perspective, the Clippers not wanting him is the reason DeAndre Jordan to Cleveland didn’t come together.

All of which made it a no-brainer Shumpert was going to opt into his contract for next season, as Shams Charania of The Vertical at Yahoo Sports reported.

Don’t be surprised to hear Shumpert’s name pop up in trade talks again. He doesn’t fit well with the rebuilding Kings, but if he gets healthy and can show some of his old form as a solid role player, a playoff team may have some interest as we get into the season.

Cavaliers make consecutive NBA Finals with unprecedented roster turnover between

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The Lakers got Wilt Chamberlain in 1968. The 76ers got Moses Malone in 1982. The Warriors got Kevin Durant in 2016.

And the Cavaliers lost Kyrie Irving in 2017.

It’s not uncommon for a team to be involved in star movement between back-to-back NBA Finals appearances. But teams good enough to make the Finals usually lure a star, not lose one.

Cleveland is the exception, dealing Irving to Boston after he requested a trade last summer. Not only did they lose half of LeBron James‘ supporting stars, the Cavs moved on from several other players who participated in their 2017 playoff run – Iman Shumpert, Deron Williams, Richard Jefferson, Channing Frye, Derrick Williams, Dahntay Jones and James Jones.

Yet, the Cavaliers are back in the Finals again.

Cleveland’s returning players account for just 62% of its postseason minutes the year prior. That’s the lowest mark for a returning finalist since the NBA began tracking minutes in 1952.

Only the Chamberlain-acquiring Lakers, Durant-acquiring Warriors and Malone-acquiring 76ers are even within shouting distance.

Here’s how every team to reach consecutive NBA Finals ranks in percentage of playoff minutes returned from the first year (counting only players who played in both postseasons):

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Though the Cavaliers already rank first in roster turnover, this method even underrates their transformation.

Since the 2017 Finals, Cleveland acquired, gave significant roles to then traded Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Dwyane Wade and Derrick Rose. None of those four factor into this calculation, but they obviously contribute heavily to the Cavs’ instability.

Irving counts, and he thrusted the Cavaliers into this historic situation.

Sure, the Lakers, 76ers and Warriors moved significant pieces to get Chamberlain, Malone and Durant. But those were clear upgrades and easy organizational decisions.

Irving chose to be traded far more than Cleveland chose to trade him. That decision sent the Cavs spiraling… but also wound up with them right back where they started.

If there’s a lesson in all this: No how matter how much surrounding chaos, LeBron wins the East.

Report: Kings angered Cavaliers and Jazz by trying to include Georgios Papagiannis in trade at last minute

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The Cavaliers were busy leading up to the trade deadline.

The completed three trades with four teams, sent out six players and acquired four. They also seriously discussed a deal with the Clippers for DeAndre Jordan.

One of the trades Cleveland general manager Koby Altman actually made – a three-teamer with the Jazz and Kings that netted Rodney Hood and George Hill and sent Jae Crowder and Derrick Rose to Utah and Iman Shumpert to Sacramento – could have fallen apart. Unsurprisingly, the Kings are getting blamed.

Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN:

Altman had negotiated the trade with Kings assistant general manager Brandon Williams, who works under GM Vlade Divac. The management structure in Sacramento can make deals dicey, because Divac seldom gets on the phone for the trade-building parts — and yet he ultimately has decision-making power with owner Vivek Ranadive.

That’s why a 3 a.m. ET deal memo sent from Sacramento to Cleveland left Altman at first incredulous — and then angry. Suddenly, Kings center Georgios Papagiannis had been included as part of the three-way trade. Cleveland and Utah were adamant that Papagiannis’ name had never been discussed. Williams would later say that Papagiannis or Malachi Richardson were set to be included in the deals and insisted his notes confirmed that.

Because Sacramento had the makings for a trade with Toronto for Richardson, rival executives say that the Kings pushed to spare themselves the embarrassment of waiving the No. 13 overall pick in the 2016 NBA draft — and let someone else do it. In the middle of the night, Altman and Williams vocally disagreed over the insertion of Papagiannis into the trade. Cleveland couldn’t take him into its roster because the NBA’s repeater tax would turn the balance of his $2.3 million contract this year and $2.4 million next year into three times that with the luxury-tax bill.

In the morning, Altman let the Jazz know about Sacramento’s inclusion of Papagiannis. Jazz GM Dennis Lindsey was livid. To him, this was a deal-breaker. He hadn’t dealt directly with Sacramento, because there had been no need: The deal went through Cleveland, and Altman had never suggested to Lindsey that Utah would have to take a 7-foot draft bust onto his roster.

The Cavs didn’t want Papagiannis, who would have cost them far more in luxury tax, either. And the Kings had to shed one more player, because they needed to clear a roster spot to complete the trade.

But the teams still found a workable solution.

The Cavaliers ($2.1 million) and Jazz ($1.1 million) both sent Sacramento cash. That was was the most the Cavs, who’ve already included cash in other deals, were allowed to convey. So, to get Utah to cover the rest, Cleveland granted the Jazz the right to swap 2024 second-rounders.

That mostly covered the Kings’ cost of waiving Papagiannis, who was guaranteed$3,206,606 the rest of this season plus next. [Correction: This post previously didn’t include Papagiannis’ 2018-19 salary.]

Sacramento management has struggled to communicate with players, agents and executives. The Kings might spin this story a different way, but everyone will believe they’re at fault. They’ve long lost lost benefit of the doubt, and this will only further erode trust.

But maybe they leveraged the confusion into a little extra money. That’s almost certainly not worth it in a relationship business, but it’s better than nothing.

Koby Altman: Cavaliers worried they were ‘marching to a slow death’

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The Cavaliers were 7-13 in their last 20 games heading into the trade deadline. Their defense ranked near last in the NBA. There appeared to be discord at every level of the organization – terrible timing, considering LeBron James‘ impending player option.

It felt like a dark cloud hung over Cleveland.

So, the Cavs conducted a radical overhaul yesterday. They traded six players (Isaiah Thomas, Jae Crowder, Iman Shumpert, Channing Frye, Dwyane Wade and Derrick Rose) for four (George Hill, Rodney Hood, Larry Nance Jr. and Jordan Clarkson) while adding payroll and surrendering picks.

Cavaliers’ general manager Koby Altman, via Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic:

“We were really worried that what was going on on the floor and sort of our culture in the building, we were marching to a slow death,” Altman said Thursday night. “We didn’t want to be a part of that.”

Teams usually deny such grave problems, nobody wanting to admit they let such a toxic environment develop on their watch. Altman is being atypically blunt despite holding some culpability.

He traded Kyrie Irving for Thomas and Crowder (and, of course, the Nets pick), still approving the trade after seeing Thomas’ physical (getting just an extra second-rounder). Thomas spent most of the season sidelined, struggled upon his return while still assuming a huge role and pointed fingers. Crowder underwhelmed all season, though for reasons more difficult to pinpoint, and that only contributed to the feeling of despair in Cleveland.

Maybe Altman just got unlucky with Thomas and Crowder, whose Cavs tenures went about as poorly as could have been imagined when the Irving trade was consummated. But Wade and Rose – whom Altman crowed about – flopped for more predictable reasons. Under Altman, communication between LeBron and the front office reportedly broke down.

That was a stark contrast to Altman’s predecessor and old boss, David Griffin. But Altman’s statement yesterday brought to mind Griffin’s words when firing David Blatt: “Pretty good is not what we’re here for.”

Of course, Griffin and Altman spoke so freely only because they’d already made the bold moves to change course. Griffin’s resulted in Tyronn Lue guiding the Cavs to a championship. We’ll see whether Altman’s prompts a march toward such a fruitful outcome.

Kings to waive Georgios Papagiannis less than two years after drafting him in lottery

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Shortly after the Kings drafted Georgios Papagiannis with the No. 13 pick in the 2016 NBA draft, DeMarcus Cousins tweeted:

Cousins claimed he was talking about yoga, not criticizing his then-team’s pick. But if he were talking about the draft, maybe Cousins was onto something.

Papagiannis has barely played in two NBA seasons and performed poorly when he has gotten onto the court. Now, he appears headed out of the league at age 20.

Shams Charania of Yahoo Sports:

This presumably clears the way for the Kings to keep Bruno Caboclo, whom they acquired in a trade with the Raptors today. Sacramento needed to clear a roster spot to facilitate its trade with the Cavaliers and Jazz (Joe Johnson and Iman Shumpert for George Hill).

The Kings will be on the hook for the rest of Papagiannis’ $2,301,360 salary this season and his $2,400,480 salary next season. Obviously, it never looks good to waive such a high pick so soon.

But Sacramento got the No. 13 pick by trading down from No. 8 on draft night. The eighth pick, Marquese Chriss, is floundering, and other assets the Kings netted in the deal – the rights to Bogdan Bogdanovic and the pick that became Skal Labissiere – are providing more value. So, that makes it easier to stomach dropping Papagiannis.