Harry Giles

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Kings decline fourth-year options for Harry Giles, Caleb Swanigan

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The Kings appeared committed to Harry Giles, who enrolled at Duke just a few years ago as a potential No. 1 pick.

Knee issues limited him in college, and Sacramento got him with the No. 20 pick in the 2017 NBA draft. The Kings sat him his entire first season, hoping to allow him to develop physically. He debuted last season, looking alright in limited minutes. Their faith in Giles reportedly even contributed to them firing Dave Joerger just a few months ago.

But now Sacramento is cutting funding to the Giles reclamation project.

The Kings had a $3,976,510 team option on Giles and a $3,665,787 team option on Caleb Swanigan for next season.

James Ham of NBC Sports California:

The Kings passed on Caleb Swanigan’s fourth-year option and in a surprise move, they also declined to pick up Harry Giles’ fourth season.

What a disappointing development for Sacramento amid an already-disappointing 0-5 start to the season.

Giles could still pan out. But he has yet to play this season, and the Kings – the team that knows him best – declining his option certainly invites pessimism. Giles has yet to play this season amid continued knee problems. Not long ago, Sacramento was counting on him as part of a young core that also included De'Aaron Fox, Buddy Hield and Marvin Bagley III.

Acquired in a low-level trade with the Trail Blazers last season, Swanigan never held that stature. The former No. 26 pick just hasn’t looked like an NBA player. He’s an undersized interior scorer with limited athleticism.

Giles and Swanigan will become unrestricted free agents next summer.

Report: Kings signing Richaun Holmes for room exception

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The Kings have used their considerable cap space to add plenty of depthHarrison Barnes, Dewayne Dedmon, Trevor Ariza, Cory Joseph.

With that cap room essentially exhausted, Sacramento will use its room exception for one more rotation-level player – Richaun Holmes

James Ham of NBC Sports California:

Sacramento can pay Holmes $9,772,350 with the room exception ($4,767,000 next season, $5,005,350 the following season).

Holmes is an energy big who will provide depth with Willie-Cauley Stein almost certainly departing. The Kings pulled Cauley-Stein’s qualifying offer, making him an unrestricted free agent.

Sacramento has plenty of options at center now – Dedmon, Holmes, Marvin Bagley III and Harry Giles. Bagley will get plenty of minutes at power forward, but he might play center long-term. It’ll be important to get him reps there, especially defensively. His upside is immense and the Kings obviously care about developing him.

But winning is also important, and 25-year-old Holmes is ready to help with that.

Report: Trevor Ariza headed to Sacramento, agrees to two-year, $25 million contract

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The Sacramento Kings, your entertaining league-pass favorite from last season, is serious about making the playoffs this season (and ending the longest postseason drought in the NBA).

To that end, they are adding wing depth and veteran leadership in the form of Trevor Ariza, according to Shams Charania of The Athletic.

Ariza averaged 14.1 points per game after being traded to the Wizards last season. He’s a solid veteran that new coach Luke Walton can trust with minutes.

The Kings have re-signed Harrison Barnes, who played more at the three last season for the Kings but may be pushed into service at the four considering Bogdan Bogdanovic and now Ariza also need minutes on the wing. That said, the Kings now have a lot of athletic depth to go with the speed of De'Aaron Fox and the shooting of Buddy Hield. The Kings also have added Dewayne Dedmon at the five to pair with the improving Harry Giles and anyone else they might sign.

The Kings are going to be fun again next season. And good.

First five picks of 2018 NBA draft make All-Rookie first team

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Remember the first five picks of last year’s draft?

1. Suns: Deandre Ayton

2. Kings: Marvin Bagley

3. Hawks (to Mavericks): Luka Doncic

4. Grizzlies: Jaren Jackson Jr.

5. Mavericks (to Hawks): Trae Young

A year later, and those same five players comprise the All-Rookie first team.

Here’s the full voting (first-place votes, second-place votes and voting points in parentheses):

First team

Luka Doncic, DAL (100-0-200)

Trae Young, ATL (100-0-200)

Deandre Ayton, PHO (95-5-195)

Jaren Jackson Jr., MEM (60-39-159)

Marvin Bagley III, SAC (56-44-156)

Second team

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, LAC (40-58-138)

Collin Sexton, CLE (39-54-132)

Landry Shamet, LAC (3-79-85)

Mitchell Robinson, NYK (3-71-77)

Kevin Huerter, ATL (1-43-45)

Also receiving votes: Mikal Bridges, PHO (1-29-31); Kevin Knox, NYK (0-22-22); Josh Okogie, MIN (1-10-12); Jalen Brunson, DAL (0-10-10); Allonzo Trier, NYK (0-10-10); Rodions Kurucs, BRK (0-9-9); Wendell Carter Jr., CHI (0-7-7); Miles Bridges, CHA (1-4-6); Bruce Brown, DET (0-2-2); Harry Giles III, SAC (0-2-2); Mo Bamba, ORL (0-1-1); Aaron Holiday, IND (0-1-1)

This is only the second time the top five picks all made the ensuing All-Rookie first team. The other: 1984-85, when the top five picks were:

1. Rockets: Hakeem Olajuwon

2. Trail Blazers: Sam Bowie

3. Bulls: Michael Jordan

4. Mavericks: Sam Perkins

5. 76ers: Charles Barkley

I don’t think voters erred by favoring bigger-name players this year. I had the same first-team picks.

My only quibble: I would’ve put Mikal Bridges and Jalen Brunson on the second team over Kevin Huerter and Collin Sexton. Sexton made incredible strides during the season, but focusing on that obscures his awful start in what I think should be a full-season assessment. His box plus-minus (-5.2) is the worst ever for an All-Rookie teamer since Adam Morrison in 2007 (-5.5).

But if Sexton continues on the track he showed within the season, nobody will view him as another bust.

This is an impressive rookie class, led by Doncic. This will be the first of many honors for several of these players.

Report: Dave Joerger wanted Luka Doncic over Marvin Bagley III, had disconnect with several Kings

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Dave Joerger – whom the Kings fired last week – sounded like he wanted Sacramento to draft Luka Doncic over Marvin Bagley III with last year’s No. 2 pick.

Maybe because Joerger actually did.

Jason Jones of The Athletic:

Sources say Joerger also favored drafting Luka Doncic over Bagley

It seems Joerger never got on the same page with Bagley. Or Sacramento rookie Harry Giles.

Jones:

Joerger never seemed to connect with prized rookie Marvin Bagley III, leaving the second overall pick to wonder privately if Joerger even liked him, a source said.

Harry Giles, another player the front office had faith in, couldn’t crack Joerger’s rotation earlier in the season, and sources said Giles was a player the coach did not communicate well with or believe in.

Remember that time Joerger argued with Buddy Hield after the guard made a clutch 3-pointer? Jones:

sources said Hield was bothered by how Joerger undressed him publicly.

Hield had expressed concerns about his role with the Kings last season, and sources said Hield was another player Joerger was not as high on as management was going into this season. Sources also said Joerger would have been in favor of trading Hield before the 2018-19 season.

I suggest reading Jones’ full article for more details of Joerger’s issues in Sacramento.

The key takeaway: Kings general manager Vlade Divac clearly believes in the players he assembled more than Joerger ever did.

And that could have been fine. The coach doesn’t always have to share the exact same perspective as the front office. The coach just must maximize the players he’s given.

And in many ways, Joerger appeared to do that. Under Joerger, Sacramento developed a strong identity of speed. De'Aaron Fox improved at a historically fast rate. Hield improved a lot, too. Even Bagley and Giles progressed through the season as they eased into larger roles. Whatever rifts existed, the team played together. I thought Joerger did one of the very best coaching jobs this season. (He also looks right about Doncic over Bagley.)

That doesn’t mean he was the right coach going forward, though. Just because he kept the team connected enough this season doesn’t mean Joerger would have continued to do so. Fraying was beginning to show.

But Divac definitely puts pressure on himself by, in his first move after a contract extension, firing the coach who just guided the Kings to their best season in 13 years. Divac is not shy about expressing faith in his roster. Firing Joerger is the biggest pronouncement yet.