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Giannis Antetokounmpo on Sterling Brown: “I’m always going to have my brother’s back”

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Bucks guard Sterling Brown has landed in the middle of a national debate on police use of excessive force with black men. Last January, Brown was thrown to the ground and tased over a late-night parking violation, a situation where six police officers were called but, in the video, Brown shows no signs of resistance (you can see the video above). Brown filed a civil rights lawsuit against the Milwaukee Police Department regarding the incident, the city’s mayor apologized for it, the Milwaukee Fire and Police Commission asked for a full review of, and the officers involved faced mild suspensions. The Milwaukee City Attorney filed papers in court saying the officers did nothing wrong, the Bucks organization responded with support for Brown.

It’s not just the organization that has Brown’s back, it’s the players. Giannis Antetokounmpo said this when asked about it by CBS News.

“At the end of the day, I’m always going to have my brother’s back. That’s all that matters. I had a chance to talk to him and I told him, ‘whatever you need, I’m here,'” Antetokounmpo said. “As a team, we talked about it, we told him, ‘no matter what you believe, that was wrong. We’re going to have your back.'”

NBA players have not been afraid to speak out on police brutality issues, going back to LeBron James and the Heat honoring Trayvon Martin or the players that wore “I can’t breathe” shirts during warmups after the Eric Garner incident.

This time nobody died, fortunately, but the pattern was the same — an unnecessary escalation to violence. Brown has a certain status as an NBA player that makes this case high profile, and it brings him support from other high profile individuals, but the concern is for the people this happens to who do not have that status or the ability to push back against the system the same way.

Steven Adams wrote Kevin Durant didn’t like Thunder drafting him, Durant remembers differently

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Steven Adams has become an anchor in Oklahoma City, one of the best centers in the game, a defensive force in the paint, a beast on the boards, and a guy who sets a strong pick and can roll hard. Plus, he brings an attitude to the court that is part of who the Thunder are.

Durant loved Adams as a teammate… but did it start out that way? In his biography that’s not how Adams remembers it (hat tip ESPN).

The rumor that KD was not happy about the Adams pick has been around since that draft, and he has vehemently (in a NSFW way) denied that was the case.

Who was still on the board when the Thunder took Adams? Looking back, the best player by far is Giannis Antetokounmpo, but he was so raw it was considered a roll-of-the-dice pick at the time at 15. There also was Shabazz Muhammad, Tim Hardaway, Rudy Gobert, Tony Snell, and Kelly Olynyk. Looking back, outside of the Greek Freak the Thunder wouldn’t trade Adams for any of those other picks.

Mike Budenholzer bolsters Bucks

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The Bucks had a superstar. They had another borderline All-Star. They had a solid supporting cast.

And now they have a workable vision.

Milwaukee made the biggest coaching upgrade of the year, going from Jason Kidd/interim Joe Prunty to Mike Budenholzer. Add a couple complementary signings, and the Bucks are coming together.

The Celtics, Raptors and 76ers are in the Eastern Conference’ post-LeBron James first class. Milwaukee fits into the next tier with the Pacers, but an ascension to the top tier appears more likely than a drop lower.

Giannis Antetokounmpo is elite. Khris Middleton is underrated. The rest of the rotation is solid throughout.

The goal must be ending a 17-year playoff-series-victory drought, the NBA’s longest going.

Budenholzer should help. The Bucks got him with the Raptors in hot pursuit, a coup for small-market Milwaukee. (An aside: Would Budenholzer have picked Toronto if he knew Kawhi Leonard would be there?) Budenholzer is not the NBA’s best coach, but he needn’t be.

Whatever innovation Kidd’s switching defense brought, opponents had mostly solved it. His offensive philosophy was dated. And he’d worn out relationships with his players.

Budenholzer had a strong record of player development with the Hawks. His defenses have been sound. And his offense is modern.

To that end, the Bucks signed stretch bigs Ersan Ilyasova and Brook Lopez.

Ilyasova was surprisingly expensive. Milwaukee guaranteed him $7 million each of the next two seasons, and he has an early guarantee date (two days after the 2020 draft) for his $7 million salary the following year. But he just knows how to play. Ilyasova is a good shooter and heady defender who takes advantage of his keen understanding of positioning with a willingness to take charges.

Lopez was a bargain on a one-year, $3,382,000 contract. He might start at center. At minimum, he’s more dependable than Thon Maker. Lopez has quickly become one of the NBA’s better 3-point-shooting centers, and he’s a solid interior defender.

Budenholzer knows how to effectively spread the floor using bigs like Ilyasova and Lopez. And Milwaukee already had good backcourt shooters in Tony Snell and Malcolm Brogdon. It’s downright scary how much space Antetokounmpo will have, whether it’s attacking one-on-one or in pick-and-rolls with Eric Bledsoe.

Landing Ilyasova and Lopez came at a cost, though. The Bucks let Jabari Parker walk, a historically quick exit for the former No. 2 pick.

The failure to get nothing for him can’t be pinned solely on this offseason. Matching the Bulls’ $20 million salary for him wouldn’t have necessarily been wise. Considering Milwaukee’s obvious unwillingness to pay the luxury tax, it was untenable.

But how did the Bucks not see this coming? Why didn’t they move Parker before the trade deadline? And why did they allow him to become an unrestricted free agent in the latter stages of his free agency?

Parker’s two-year deal with Chicago wouldn’t have been possible as an offer sheet, which is required for restricted free agents. The contract contains a team option, and offer sheets must be for at least two years not counting options. If Milwaukee kept Parker restricted – even without an intention to match – the Bulls would have been forced to sign him to a different contract, one not as favorable to them or Parker. Chicago probably would have just made the second year unguaranteed – a small, but noteworthy, difference. But the Bulls never had to make that choice, because the Bucks let Parker become unrestricted.

Chicago isn’t close to challenging the Bucks. But Antetokounmpo is just 23. The Bulls could definitely become competitive during Antetokounmpo’s prime, and Milwaukee – out of kindness to Parker or fealty to his agent, Mark Bartelstein – made it easier for them to build.

The Bucks also drafted Donte DiVincenzo with the No. 17 and signed Pat Connaughton for slightly more than the minimum. I don’t expect either to contribute much this year.

Antetokounmpo gives Milwaukee a wide-open window. Middleton and Bledsoe are headed toward unrestricted free agency next summer, and the 2019 offseason will go a long way in shaping this team long-term.

But the Bucks have a serious chance this year to have their best season in a long time, and that matters.

They were always due to take a step forward next season. Their moves this summer just push them along a little more.

Offseason grade: B-

Giannis Antetokounmpo, Danilo Gallinari, other NBA players skipping FIBA qualifying window

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When basketball international coordinating body FIBA came up with its ridiculous soccer-style qualifying system for the 2019 World Cup — putting qualifying windows in the middle of the seasons of the NBA and other major leagues around the world — they knew that they were essentially banning most country’s best players from competing. (The USA has used a team of G-League players, for example, but it’s harder on other nations who do not have as deep a talent pool.)

There was one exception: A September 2018 qualifying window. Games would primarily fall in mid-September before NBA training camps are open but when teams have opened their facilities to players for organized runs. (For example, the USA plays on Sept. 14 in Las Vegas against Uruguay, then in Panama on Sept. 17.)

NBA players are mostly taking a pass. In recent days the Bucks’ Giannis Antetokounmpo, the Clippers’ Danilo Gallinari, and the Spurs Marco Belinelli have all said they would not play for their respective nations in this qualifying window. The USA didn’t even consider it and will have its G-Leaguers coached by Jeff Van Gundy.

This is not universal. Jusuf Nurkic has said he will play in the Bosnian and Herzegovinian qualifiers (although we will see if that happens, he did just sign a new four-year contract with the Blazers this summer). Jordan Clarkson is playing for the Philippines in the Asian Games and is on that squad’s roster for the qualifiers. The Serbian coach has put Nikola Jokic and four other NBA players on his potential roster submitted to FIBA, but that seems more to be him covering his bases just in case, not something likely to happen. Others might jump in.

But by and large, NBA players — and the biggest names — are taking a pass. Once again, well done FIBA on finding a way to water down the quality of the product for the second most popular sport on the planet to make more money.

Some NBA players — Evan Fournier, Timofey Mozgov, others — took part in the July qualifying window.

When the USA heads to China for the World Cup next summer (it still has to qualify, but that is highly likely) it will be a Gregg Popovich-coached team of NBA stars, 35 of whom just showed up for a USA Basketball mini-camp in Las Vegas. But that is a year away, until then enjoy most nation’s second string trying to get their country there.

Nene: Carmelo Anthony still top-10 player in NBA

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With the Rockets signing Carmelo Anthony, James Harden and Chris Paul said flattering things about their new teammate.

But they didn’t come close to matching Nene’s praise of Anthony.

Marc Berman of Fox 26:

Follow-up question for Nene, who played with Anthony on the Nuggets: Which of these 10 players – listed in no particular order – is worse than Anthony?

And that doesn’t even get into the dozens of other players better than Anthony.

At best, Anthony is a tough fit offensively on an efficient scoring team and a limited defender. His shot creation is still valuable, and I haven’t given up on his ability as a complementary offensive player – if he embraces that role. Not every team can take advantage of his lackluster defense. But the 34-year-old Anthony has declined considerably from his peak. It’s OK to acknowledge that.

I don’t at all blame Anthony’s teammates for adulating him rather than soberly evaluating him. That’s what they’re supposed to do.

But the level of Nene’s hyperbole just makes him look silly.