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How Spurs’ Bryn Forbes went from afterthought recruit to NBA starter

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Bryn Forbes‘ 2014 transfer from Cleveland State to Michigan State was well-covered in the media. Nearly every article on it explained Forbes’ reasoning: The Lansing, Mich., native wanted to be closer to his son, who was born the year prior, and his sister, who was suffering from what would be a fatal illness.

And those explanations weren’t wrong. Family was Forbes’ primary concern.

But he had another reason: He wanted to better prepare for the NBA.

Forbes kept that one close to the vest. After all, he was a 6-foot-3 scoring guard with unexceptional athleticism. He ranked third in his 2012 recruiting class… at Cleveland State. He didn’t even make the All-Horizon League first team.

“People would have thought I’m crazy,” Forbes said. “They honestly would have thought I’m crazy.”

But Forbes’ self-confidence paid off. He’s now the Spurs’ starting shooting guard, averaging 12.4 points per game on 43.6% 3-point shooting.

It’s incredible how far he has come in just a few years.

Forbes worked hard in East Lansing, developing into a college star. Not bad for someone the Spartans initially offered only a preferred-walk-on spot despite Forbes playing in their backyard with Michigan State commit Denzel Valentine (now with the Bulls) at Lansing Sexton High School. Still, Forbes looked like the archetypical good shooter without the size or athleticism to make the NBA.

Leading up to the 2016 draft, DraftExpress ranked the top shooters in the draft. Forbes’ name appeared once – to note why he wasn’t otherwise included:

Please note that this is not an exhaustive study including all of the best shooters in college basketball or even in the 2016 NBA Draft Class. The only players included in this subset are those deemed to “draftable” NBA prospects. Players like Max Hooper (6-6, SG, Oakland, 3.3 3s made per game, 46% 3P%), Max Landis (6-2, SG, IPFW, 3.8 3s made per game, 46% 3P%), Bryn Forbes (6-3, SG, Michigan State, 3.2 3s made per game, 48% 3P%) for example were excluded, amongst others.

Jonathan Givony’s projection wasn’t exactly wrong. Forbes went undrafted.

He signed a barely guaranteed contract with San Antonio and quickly impressed Spurs president-coach Gregg Popovich with his work ethic, coachability and 3-point shot. Against all odds, Forbes made San Antonio’s regular-season roster and earned an NBA salary.

Forbes still spent much of his first professional season with the Spurs’ minor-league affiliate playing point guard. He’s more of an off guard, but that time helped him develop his ball-handling and passing.

In his second season, Forbes became a rotation regular and spot-starter. He played 1,517 minutes on a 47-win team. After the season, he signed a two-year, $6 million deal with the Spurs.

Now, Forbes is one of just six full-time starters this season who went undrafted. The other five: Robert Covington, Joe Ingles, Wesley Matthews, Garrett Temple and Rodney McGruder.

“He’s carved out an NBA career,” Popovich said of Forbes.

Though Forbes has expanded his all-around game, that merely got other facets to tolerable levels. He remains a 3-point specialist, and his 43.6% 3-point percentage ranks 12th in the NBA:

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Maybe Forbes wouldn’t be in this position if San Antonio didn’t suffer so many backcourt injuries this season. Dejounte Murray is missing the entire season. Lonnie Walker just got healthy. Derrick White was sidelined for the start of the year.

Forbes has considered similar “what ifs” in the past. What if he stayed at Cleveland State? Would he have had the platform to showcase himself for the NBA? Eventually, he decided not to dwell on that.

“I think, one way or another,” Forbes said, “I would have found a way.”

Grizzlies Dillon Brooks ruptures ligament in big toe, to have surgery, done for season

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Things just keep getting worse in Memphis. The team has lost six in a row and 11-of-13, and now their lack-of-depth will be exposed even further.

Second-year “3&D” wing Dillon Brooks is done for the season with a toe injury that requires surgery, the team announced Wednesday.

While they don’t provide a timeline, Brooks is expected to be done for the season but able to get back to workouts this summer in preparation for next season.

Brooks — who averaged 7.5 points a game off the bench in 18 minutes a night this season — was in the wing rotation with Garrett Temple, Kyle Anderson and the just acquired Justin Holiday. Expect to see a little more Omri Casspi now.

Memphis likes Brooks and how he fits into their grinding style of play, which is why he was never available in the weird failed Trevor Ariza trade.

Report: Garrett Temple-Omri Casspi fight over lack of enthusiasm by Grizzlies bench

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Garrett Temple and Omri Casspi reportedly fought during the Grizzlies’ team meeting last night.

Over what?

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

The discussion then turned toward the bench players and a perceived lack of enthusiasm from the unit, when Casspi became vocal in his defense, sources said. Temple and Casspi exchanged words and had a physical exchange before they were separated, according to those sources.

The Grizzlies are outscoring opponents by a robust 7.7 point per 48 minutes with their main starting lineup – Mike Conley, Temple, Kyle Anderson, Jaren Jackson Jr. and Marc Gasol. Otherwise, Memphis is getting outscored by 3.0 points per 48 minutes.

But starters generally perform better than reserves. This is normal.

Are the Grizzlies backups giving full effort? That’s tougher to say. There’s a fine line between someone not trying enough and just not being good enough.

Ultimately, Memphis is about where I expected – 18-19, playing well when Conley and Gasol share the court and struggling otherwise. It seems the bench could be getting scapegoated amid a tough stretch. The Grizzlies have lost three straight and eight of 10.

Winning will ease tension, and this team is good enough to break out of this slump. I’m just not sure it’s good enough to perform much better than it has over the entire season so far.

Three Things to Know: Paul George hears boos, then shows Lakers fans what they missed out on

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Paul George hears boos, then drops 37 on Lakers fans to show them what they missed out on. When Paul George was forcing his way out of Indiana a couple of years ago, his people told any team that called “he’s going to be a Laker when he’s a free agent” in an effort to force him to get traded to his hometown. Except the Lakers took that as “why would we give up real assets for him — no Lonzo Ball, no Brandon Ingram — when we can just sign him in a year?” Oklahoma City ponied up with the best deal — the Victor Oladipo and Domantas Sabonis deal worked out well for Indy — and PG 13 went to the Thunder. And turned out to love Oklahoma City. So he stayed. When free agency came up last July the Lakers didn’t even get a meeting, Paul George found a new home.

Lakers fans felt jilted — and they let George hear it with boos on Wednesday night.

Then Paul George came out and showed those Lakers fans what they missed out on — he scored 37 points, hit tough shots, played phenomenal defense and helped the Thunder dominate the fourth quarter in a 107-100 OKC win.

(For the record, if Lakers fans want to be pissed about not getting PG13, be pissed at Magic Johnson and Rob Pelinka for not offering more in a trade with Indy. They let George get a feel for a new place and lost him then, George had the right to make any decision he wants.)

As much as George and his story make the best headline, this game was about the Thunder defense — it’s the best in the NBA and shut the Lakers down in the fourth. Without LeBron James (still sidelined with a groin injury) the Lakers struggled to create in the halfcourt, and in the fourth quarter shot just 28.6 percent. Steven Adams can be a force on the offensive glass that forces teams to account for him and slows a fast break attack, which the rest of the Thunder do a good job of getting back to slow. George is a disruptive on-ball defender. The Thunder locked the Lakers up when it mattered, and it’s that defense that makes the Thunder a real playoff threat (and could get them to the conference finals).

The takeaway for the Lakers? They’re 1-3 without LeBron. They miss him. This isn’t rocket science. Lonzo Ball can run the point guard spot well, Brandon Ingram’s passing is good (although he made faster decisions vs. Sacramento), but in the end this team needs LeBron, and there is no timetable yet for his return.

2) After a third straight loss, divisions in Grizzlies locker room turn physical with an altercation. After a fast start to the season, the Grizzlies have lost three in a row and 8-of-10. In that stretch, Memphis has had a bottom five offense in the league and the defense — which carried them early in the season — has been just average. The result is the team has slipped both out of the playoffs (now the 10 seed, 2.5 games out of the postseason) and below .500.

The ugly play in a loss at home to Detroit Wednesday led to a postgame team meeting — one that reportedly turned physical in a fight between starting guard Garrett Temple and reserve wing Omri Casspi. The issue reportedly was a complaint about the energy and enthusiasm of the bench. Whether those bench struggles are due to the roster makeup — this is not a deep Grizzlies team — or effort, there apparently is some built up resentment there.

Altercations like this are a sign of frustration, something the Grizzlies have plenty of with their recent run of play. Beyond that, be careful reading much into it. Very good teams — championship teams — have had guys fight in practice and get past it. Other times, it can fester as part of a larger problem. Right now the Grizzlies need to find a way to get back to scoring more effectively, regardless of who is on the court. Otherwise, that frustration is just going to grow as the losses keep piling up.

3) With Kyrie Irving out, Gordon Hayward has season best 35 and Celtics cruise to win over Timberwolves. We have a new “best game for Gordon Hayward” as a Celtic as he shot 14-of-18 off the bench on his way to 35 points. He was moving well and is clearly got confidence in his shot again.

The Celtics offense looked more egalitarian and guys stepped up with Irving out (an eye injury). Terry Rozier got off to a fast start with 11 first-quarter points (he finished with 16), and he is just clearly more comfortable as a starter. He even pulled off the Rondo-fake brilliantly.

Al Horford had one of his best games of the season, making smart passes and keeping the ball moving on offense, and in the first half defending Karl-Anthony Towns well. Marcus Smart is a better playmaker than people think and has eight assists. Jaylen Brown was making plays off the bench.

Boston played a strong team game.

The Celtics are not better without Kyrie Irving. They need him. He deservedly is the guy at the top of the offensive pecking order. But the Celtics need to find a way — they need Irving to buy in — and get more of the ball movement and system offense going when Irving is in the lineup. The Celtics we saw Wednesday looked more like last year’s playoff Celtics, like the kind of team that can do damage in this postseason if they keep playing this way.

As for a Minnesota takeaway… ugh.

Report: Grizzlies teammates Garrett Temple, Omri Casspi physically fight after loss to Pistons

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Grizzlies coach J.B. Bickerstaff took more than 30 minutes before addressing the media following Memphis’ loss to the Pistons on Wednesday. The standard wait time for a coach’s post-game press conference is about 10 minutes.

Chris Herrington of the Daily Memphian:

What was happening in the locker room?

“A conversation that needed to be had that will stay between those of us that were in that locker room,” said Bickerstaff when he finally, in a bleary state, took to the dais.

Apparently, it didn’t stay in the locker room.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

Team meetings happen. They usually don’t include teammates physically fighting each other. When those physical fights happen, they don’t always leak to the media – especially this quickly. Every signal suggests larger-than-typical problems in Memphis.

The Grizzlies have lost three straight and eight of 10. Whether or not Garrett Temple‘s and Omri Casspi‘s altercation was specifically about on-court matters, losing exacerbates all problems.

Now that this is public, it demands a public response from the Grizzlies. They can’t just tolerate co-workers fighting each other. So, expect Memphis to announce suspensions, fines or even just a vague internal punishment. But it has to be something.