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Donovan Mitchell turned to James Harden, Kobe Bryant for advice on early season struggles

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Players that have elite rookie NBA seasons often plateau at the start of — or during all of — their second season. The leap in adjusting to the NBA that often players make in their second or third season tends to happen earlier for these elite rookies, meaning they already made their jump. Also, defenses are now aware of them and are focused on them.

It happened to Utah’s Donovan Mitchell — in November and December his offensive net rating was less than a point per possession. He had a below average true shooting percentage of 51 in November and 47.3 in December. Mitchell told Michael Shapiro of Sports Illustrated that Jazz coach Quin Snyder warned him this was coming, that he was the first thing in the scouting report and defenses would be focused on him, but being told that and experiencing it are two different things.

“Coach Snyder stressed to me that this year was going to be a lot different, and it was one thing for me to hear, and another thing for me to go through it,” Mitchell said regarding Utah’s poor start. “It’s one of those things you really have to go through, to experience. They kind of anticipated this happening, I didn’t. But to have the support of my teammates through the early part of the season was really special, and really helped get us back to where we need to be.”

So Mitchell reached out for help, speaking to James Harden, Chris Paul, and Kobe Bryant. They all had similar advice — get to the free throw line more.

“This year, it’s different. I have to be locked in for every moment, they make it so tough on every possession,” Mitchell told The Crossover. “But the words I’ve received from James [Harden], from Kobe [Bryant], Chris Paul, it’s helped me understand that. I think in my rookie year, I was really taken aback. This year I came seeking advice….

“Changing my pace and making an effort to get to the free-throw line, that’s something James [Harden] is great at and Dwyane Wade talked to me about as well,” Mitchell said. “To hear that from them and then trying to follow their advice really helped me get back on track.”

In November and December, Mitchell averaged 4 free throw attempts per game (which was in line with his 3.8 attempts per game as a rookie). However, since Jan. 1 that is up to 6 a game — and the Jazz are 24-11. (Part of that is the Jazz had a very tough early schedule that has softened up considerably since.)

That Mitchell is reaching out and seeking help from the best is a good thing — it shows his drive, his desire to improve. That is what is going to help him take the next step (although another good playmaker next to him to relieve some of that defensive attention wouldn’t hurt).

Chris Bosh says Heat ‘big three’ sparked Kevin Durant’s move to Warriors

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Chris Bosh could have continued what he was doing, being the face of the Toronto Raptors. He had made the All-Star team five years in a row, was the focal point of the Toronto offense on the court and the team’s marketing off it, and he was getting his touches, averaging 24 points a game his last season north of the border.

Yet he chose to leave, to head all the way down to Miami to team up with Dwyane Wade and LeBron James.

It’s a “big three” that changed the game. On the court somewhat, they won two titles and went to four straight Finals. However, Bosh told our own NBC Sports NBA Insider Tom Haberstroh that the bigger impact was off the court, where other players — Kevin Durant, Kyrie Irving, Kawhi Leonard, and most recently Anthony Davis — have started to take charge of their own careers and destiny.

“It’s huge,” Bosh says of the trio’s pioneering role. “A lot of people don’t like it, that’s the funniest part.”

Don’t like what?

“An athlete with brains.”

Bosh said the Heat’s big three specifically helped lead to one of the most controversial moves in the NBA in recent years — Durant to the Warriors.

I ask him, does Durant leave OKC if Bosh and the Big Three don’t choose to team up in 2010?

“No,” Bosh says now. “That put pressure on him.”

LeBron gets most of the credit for players taking a more aggressive role in charting their own course and not just going where the tide takes them with their career. Deservedly so, he was the best player in the game when he went to Miami and changed the game.

But Bosh did his part, too.

Next Tuesday in Miami Bosh will get a little recognition when his jersey is retired. As it should be. Those banners aren’t hanging in Miami if Bosh didn’t only come to the team but willingly sacrificed and changed his game to fit around what LeBron and the team needed. He was a No. 1 option who completely changed how he played to win.

That’s a lesson more players could use to pick up on.

Dwyane Wade sinks halfcourt buzzer-beater (video)

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Dwyane Wade is secure in his legacy. He’s an all-time great, and an extra missed 3-pointer during his farewell tour won’t change anything. (It doesn’t hurt that his resumé already includes subpar 3-point shooting.)

So, when many players would hold the ball, Wade heaved in a halfcourt shot to end the third quarter of the Heat’s 110-105 win over the Spurs on Wednesday. It wasn’t the biggest shot of Wade’s season, but it still mattered plenty.

Miami’s lead when San Antonio began intentionally fouling late? Three.

Giannis Antetokounmpo becomes record 11th player with 50-point game this season

AP Photo/Aaron Gash
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During the entire 2012-13 season, three players scored 50 points in a game.

By the end of last October, four players – Blake Griffin, Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Derrick Rose – already had 50-point games this season.

James Harden has since scored 50 six times. Kemba Walker, LeBron James, Kevin Durant, LaMarcus Aldridge, Damian Lillard also dropped 50 in a game.

Giannis Antetokounmpo‘s 52-pointer yesterday made him the 11th different player to score 50 points in a game this season – a record. Ten players scored 50 in a game each of the last two seasons.

This is definitely a record geared toward modern times. Scoring is up. There have never been more games (30 teams playing 82-game schedules). Those conditions give individuals a chance to shine.

And so many of them have taken advantage with a big scoring night, at least once.

Harden is the only player with multiple 50-point games this season, so this year won’t come close to the record for total 50 point games. The 16 this season are fourth-most all-time – behind 1961-62 (57), 1962-63 (34) and 2006-07 (18). Wilt Chamberlain alone had 45 in 1961-62 and 30 in 1962-63. Kobe Bryant had 10 in 2006-07.

But in terms of variety of 50-point games, this season is unmatched.

Here are how many different players had a 50-point game each season, followed by a list of them all:image

2018-19: 11

James Harden (HOU), 6

LaMarcus Aldridge (SAS), 1

Giannis Antetokounmpo (MIL), 1

Damian Lillard (POR), 1

Derrick Rose (MIN), 1

Klay Thompson (GSW), 1

Stephen Curry (GSW), 1

Blake Griffin (DET), 1

Kevin Durant (GSW), 1

LeBron James (LAL), 1

Kemba Walker (CHA), 1

2017-18: 10

James Harden (HOU), 4

C.J. McCollum (POR), 1

Lou Williams (LAC), 1

DeMar DeRozan (TOR), 1

Anthony Davis (NOP), 1

Kevin Durant (GSW), 1

Damian Lillard (POR), 1

Karl-Anthony Towns (MIN), 1

LeBron James (CLE), 1

Bradley Beal (WAS), 1

2016-17: 10

Russell Westbrook (OKC), 4

James Harden (HOU), 2

Jimmy Butler (CHI), 1

Devin Booker (PHO), 1

Damian Lillard (POR), 1

Anthony Davis (NOP), 1

Isaiah Thomas (BOS), 1

DeMarcus Cousins (SAC), 1

John Wall (WAS), 1

Klay Thompson (GSW), 1

2015-16: 8

Stephen Curry (GSW), 3

Damian Lillard (POR), 2

DeMarcus Cousins (SAC), 1

Kemba Walker (CHA), 1

Jimmy Butler (CHI), 1

Anthony Davis (NOP), 1

Kobe Bryant (LAL), 1

James Harden (HOU), 1

2014-15: 6

Kyrie Irving (CLE), 2

James Harden (HOU), 2

Klay Thompson (GSW), 1

Mo Williams (MIN), 1

Stephen Curry (GSW), 1

Russell Westbrook (OKC), 1

2013-14: 5

Kevin Durant (OKC), 2

Terrence Ross (TOR), 1

Carmelo Anthony (NYK), 1

LeBron James (MIA), 1

Corey Brewer (MIN), 1

2012-13: 3

Kevin Durant (OKC), 1

Stephen Curry (GSW), 1

Carmelo Anthony (NYK), 1

2011-12: 3

Kevin Durant (OKC), 1

Kevin Love (MIN), 1

Deron Williams (NJN), 1

2010-11: 2

Carmelo Anthony (DEN), 1

LeBron James (MIA), 1

2009-10: 3

Andre Miller (POR), 1

Carmelo Anthony (DEN), 1

Brandon Jennings (MIL), 1

2008-09: 7

Dwyane Wade (MIA), 3

LeBron James (CLE), 3

Kobe Bryant (LAL), 1

Kevin Martin (SAC), 1

Tony Parker (SAS), 1

Jamal Crawford (GSW), 1

Brandon Roy (POR), 1

2007-08: 3

LeBron James (CLE), 2

Kobe Bryant (LAL), 2

Allen Iverson (DEN), 1

2006-07: 6

Kobe Bryant (LAL), 10

Gilbert Arenas (WAS), 3

Michael Redd (MIL), 2

Jamal Crawford (NYK), 1

Ray Allen (SEA), 1

Richard Hamilton (DET), 1

2005-06: 6

Kobe Bryant (LAL), 6

LeBron James (CLE), 2

Paul Pierce (BOS), 1

Dirk Nowitzki (DAL), 1

Vince Carter (NJN), 1

Allen Iverson (PHI), 1

2004-05: 6

Allen Iverson (PHI), 3

Damon Stoudamire (POR), 1

Jermaine O’Neal (IND), 1

Amar’e Stoudemire (PHO), 1

LeBron James (CLE), 1

Dirk Nowitzki (DAL), 1

2003-04: 4

Tracy McGrady (ORL), 2

Jamal Crawford (CHI), 1

Rashard Lewis (SEA), 1

Allen Iverson (PHI), 1

2002-03: 4

Kobe Bryant (LAL), 3

Allan Houston (NYK), 2

Jamal Mashburn (NOH), 1

Tracy McGrady (ORL), 1

2001-02: 6

Allen Iverson (PHI), 1

Kobe Bryant (LAL), 1

Tracy McGrady (ORL), 1

Shareef Abdur-Rahim (ATL), 1

Michael Jordan (WAS), 1

Tim Duncan (SAS), 1

2000-01: 7

Allen Iverson (PHI), 2

Antawn Jamison (GSW), 2

Chris Webber (SAC), 1

Tony Delk (PHO), 1

Stephon Marbury (NJN), 1

Jerry Stackhouse (DET), 1

Kobe Bryant (LAL), 1

1999-00: 4

Clifford Robinson (PHO), 1

Vince Carter (TOR), 1

Allen Iverson (PHI), 1

Shaquille O’Neal (LAL), 1

1997-98: 3

Tracy Murray (WAS), 1

Karl Malone (UTA), 1

Shaquille O’Neal (LAL), 1

1996-97: 2

Michael Jordan (CHI), 2

Allen Iverson (PHI), 1

1995-96: 5

Hakeem Olajuwon (HOU), 1

Alonzo Mourning (MIA), 1

Michael Jordan (CHI), 1

Karl Malone (UTA), 1

Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf (DEN), 1

1994-95: 7

Michael Jordan (CHI), 1

Dana Barros (PHI), 1

Glen Rice (MIA), 1

Jim Jackson (DAL), 1

Jamal Mashburn (DAL), 1

Cedric Ceballos (LAL), 1

Willie Burton (PHI), 1

1993-94: 2

David Robinson (SAS), 2

Shaquille O’Neal (ORL), 1

1992-93: 4

Michael Jordan (CHI), 4

David Robinson (SAS), 1

Nick Anderson (ORL), 1

Reggie Miller (IND), 1

1991-92: 2

Michael Jordan (CHI), 2

Dominique Wilkins (ATL), 1

1990-91: 5

Bernard King (WSB), 2

Vernon Maxwell (HOU), 1

Michael Adams (DEN), 1

Patrick Ewing (NYK), 1

Charles Smith (LAC), 1

1989-90: 8

Michael Jordan (CHI), 3

Karl Malone (UTA), 2

Tom Chambers (PHO), 2

Terry Cummings (SAS), 1

Patrick Ewing (NYK), 1

Hakeem Olajuwon (HOU), 1

Larry Bird (BOS), 1

Dale Ellis (SEA), 1

1988-89: 3

Michael Jordan (CHI), 5

Clyde Drexler (POR), 1

Alex English (DEN), 1

1987-88: 2

Michael Jordan (CHI), 4

Dominique Wilkins (ATL), 2

1986-87: 3

Michael Jordan (CHI), 8

Dominique Wilkins (ATL), 3

Moses Malone (WSB), 1

1985-86: 3

Larry Bird (BOS), 1

Dominique Wilkins (ATL), 1

Alex English (DEN), 1

1984-85: 5

Bernard King (NYK), 3

Larry Bird (BOS), 1

Kevin McHale (BOS), 1

Purvis Short (GSW), 1

Moses Malone (PHI), 1

1983-84: 3

Bernard King (NYK), 2

Kiki Vandeweghe (DEN), 2

Purvis Short (GSW), 1

1982-83: 4

Kelly Tripucka (DET), 1

Larry Bird (BOS), 1

Joe Barry Carroll (GSW), 1

Adrian Dantley (UTA), 1

1981-82: 4

Moses Malone (HOU), 1

George Gervin (SAS), 1

Ray Williams (NJN), 1

Adrian Dantley (UTA), 1

1980-81: 4

Adrian Dantley (UTA), 3

Bernard King (GSW), 1

Moses Malone (HOU), 1

Billy Knight (IND), 1

1979-80: 5

George Gervin (SAS), 2

Freeman Williams (SDC), 1

Larry Kenon (SAS), 1

Adrian Dantley (UTA), 1

Mike Newlin (NJN), 1

1978-79: 3

George Gervin (SAS), 1

Truck Robinson (NOJ), 1

John Drew (ATL), 1

1977-78: 5

Rick Barry (GSW), 2

Calvin Murphy (HOU), 1

George Gervin (SAS), 1

David Thompson (DEN), 1

John Williamson (NJN), 1

1976-77: 2

Pete Maravich (NOJ), 4

Phil Smith (GSW), 1

1975-76: 2

Bob McAdoo (BUF), 2

Phil Smith (GSW), 1

1974-75: 4

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (MIL), 2

Rick Barry (GSW), 1

Gail Goodrich (LAL), 1

Bob McAdoo (BUF), 1

1973-74: 3

Rick Barry (GSW), 3

Bob McAdoo (BUF), 1

Fred Brown (SEA), 1

1972-73: 5

Tiny Archibald (KCO), 3

Geoff Petrie (POR), 2

Rick Barry (GSW), 1

Spencer Haywood (SEA), 1

Phil Chenier (BAL), 1

1971-72: 4

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (MIL), 5

Pete Maravich (ATL), 2

Tiny Archibald (CIN), 1

Chet Walker (CHI), 1

1970-71: 4

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (MIL), 2

Dave Bing (DET), 1

Walt Wesley (CLE), 1

Elvin Hayes (SDR), 1

1969-70: 2

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (MIL), 1

Lou Hudson (ATL), 1

1968-69: 2

Wilt Chamberlain (LAL), 2

Elvin Hayes (SDR), 1

1967-68: 3

Wilt Chamberlain (PHI), 4

Earl Monroe (BAL), 1

Willis Reed (NYK), 1

1966-67: 2

Rick Barry (SFW), 6

Wilt Chamberlain (PHI), 1

1965-66: 4

Wilt Chamberlain (PHI), 5

Jerry West (LAL), 2

Sam Jones (BOS), 1

Rick Barry (SFW), 1

1964-65: 3

Wilt Chamberlain (SFW/PHI), 9

Oscar Robertson (CIN), 2

Jerry West (LAL), 1

1963-64: 3

Wilt Chamberlain (SFW), 9

Hal Greer (PHI), 1

Bob Pettit (STL), 1

1962-63: 2

Wilt Chamberlain (SFW), 30

Elgin Baylor (LAL), 4

1961-62: 7

Wilt Chamberlain (PHW), 45

Elgin Baylor (LAL), 5

Jerry West (LAL), 2

Richie Guerin (NYK), 2

Cliff Hagan (STL), 1

Rudy LaRusso (LAL), 1

Bob Pettit (STL), 1

1960-61: 3

Wilt Chamberlain (PHW), 8

Elgin Baylor (LAL), 5

Bob Pettit (STL), 1

1959-60: 4

Wilt Chamberlain (PHW), 5

Elgin Baylor (MNL), 2

Jack Twyman (CIN), 1

Richie Guerin (NYK), 1

1958-59: 4

Bob Pettit (STL), 2

Jack Twyman (CIN), 1

Elgin Baylor (MNL), 1

Dolph Schayes (SYR), 1

1957-58: 2

George Yardley (DET), 2

Bob Pettit (STL), 1

1953-54: 1

Neil Johnston (PHW), 1

1951-52: 1

George Mikan (MNL), 1

1949-50: 1

George Mikan (MNL), 1

1948-49: 2

George Mikan (MNL), 2

Joe Fulks (PHW), 1

Dwyane Wade experienced so much knee pain with Big 3 he almost quit

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The Big 3 era in Miami was one of the pivotal moments in NBA history over the last two decades. It shaped the legacy of LeBron James, as well as cemented Dwyane Wade as a Hall of Famer. Chris Bosh was the prerunner to today’s modern NBA big man.

But it almost got cut short.

Wade was just 29 years old when James and Bosh arrived in 2010, but his body was already starting to break down. In a recent story by Dan Woike at the Los Angeles Times, Wade said that he almost considered retiring because of the pain he had to deal with on a daily basis coming from both knees.

Via LA Times:

Mornings were nearly unbearable. His knees ached so badly he could barely bend them. Tasks that should be simple, such as putting on his underwear, felt more like climbing Mt. Everest.

Games, when he could get on the court, were just as tough. By the time he got to the locker room afterward, both knees would balloon.

The hurt was too much. The joy was gone. He wanted out. He thought about retiring.

“My knees were in so much pain,” Wade said. “In my right knee, I had two sets of different bone bruises. I also had chondromalacia under the kneecap, which irritates the kneecap to the extent where it’s just more pain. In my left knee, I had three surgeries so I’m dealing with arthritis. I’m dealing with swelling and all the stuff that comes with that.

“It was a time where I didn’t want to do it anymore. I didn’t want to be in pain anymore.”

Of course Wade was able to tough it out, and thinking about those Heat championship runs without him is a difficult task. As players start to age, or as eras start to pass them by, how we value their contribution seems to shift. Current context get applied when it’s not relevant, and we forget just how effective or powerful players were in their moment.

Dwyane Wade is the Miami Heat, and the Heat are Dwyane Wade. His style may be of a different time, but fans in South Beach are glad he stuck around.