Top 10 standout players from NBA Summer League

1 Comment

LAS VEGAS — For NBA teams, Summer League is less about whether a young player is good or not, and far more about benchmarking where they are and seeing what areas that player needs to work on going forward. It’s a first step.

But some of those first steps are more impressive than others.

After watching a dozen days of Summer League games — in person in both Salt Lake City and Las Vegas — here are 10 players who stood out to me. This list is not all-inclusive by any means — Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Grayson Allen, and Trae Young would get an honorable mention here — nor is it just a list of the best players I have seen. Instead, this is a list of players that turned my head, or those of scouts/team executives that I spoke with, because of their success and what they have shown in Summer League. It’s a list of guys who caught my eye.

Here is my Top 10 for 2018:

1) Jaren Jackson Jr. (Memphis Grizzlies). From the minute he stepped on the court in Salt Lake, he looked like the future of the NBA five — he can drain threes, runs the court, is strong and physical inside, and can get up and block shots. In Utah he averaged 15.7 points per game and five boards a night. Interestingly, through much the summer games the Grizzlies tried to pair him with a true center, seemingly getting him used to playing the four next to Marc Gasol come next season. Jackson looked a little tired and struggled some in Las Vegas — especially the night he battled Jonathan Isaac and Mohamed Bamba on his fifth game in seven days — but he worked hard and still made plays. The Grizzlies may have something special with him.

2) John Collins (Atlanta Hawks). Everyone already knew he was  good — he made NBA All-Rookie second team and averaged 10.5 points and 7.3 rebounds a game shooting 57.6 percent last season. However, after watching in Las Vegas and Salt Lake, he has shown the potential to be a future star, his game is improving. He’s averaging 24 points and 8 boards a game in Vegas, playing good defense in the paint, but more importantly he has shown improved three-point stroke and handles. He’s done for the summer, but in limited games he showed he should be on this list.

3) Deandre Ayton (Phoenix Suns). Yes, the No. 1 pick should be good, but he has looked like a man among boys going up against some of the other rookie big men in Las Vegas. Ayton pushed Bamba around all game long, for example. He’s averaging 16 points a game on 67 percent shooting, plus 11 boards a contest, and he’s got versatility to his game. There’s work to do on defense and passing, but he has the potential to be special.

4) Kevin Knox (New York Knicks). He’s looked like a rookie at points, he’s blown everyone’s doors off at others. Tuesday’s game against the Lakers was the perfect example: He started 0-of-6 from the floor and finished the night with seven turnovers. He’s got work to do. However, he finished that Laker game with 22 points and was 5-of-7 from three, he’s got the athleticism to get by guys with a first step and he can finish. And he’s just 18. The Knicks may have another crucial rebuilding block with Knox.

5) Jonathan Isaac (Orlando Magic). He was a roll of the dice at No. 6 in the 2017 draft, a guy with a lot of potential but a project, then he missed most of his rookie season with injuries. Nobody seemed exactly sure what Orlando had. In Vegas he has turned heads with his play —14.3 points and 7 boards a game, he’s physically a lot stronger and his shooting stroke is smooth. He has banged inside and held his own with Memphis’ Jackson, and has just been a better athlete than everyone he’s gone up against. Pair him along the front with Bamba and Aaron Gordon, and that is an interesting team in Orlando. And when was the last time we said that?

6) Josh Hart (Los Angeles Lakers). He might be the MVP of Summer League so far, averaging 23.3 points per game and just running the team like a pro. Which he is — he showed he could do this with the Lakers last season, but asked to take on more of a scoring role in Vegas he has stepped up. Bottom line, there’s a reason every time a team talks to the Lakers about a trade they want Hart thrown in the mix. He’s got a lot of fans around the league, and that has only grown this summer.

7) Wendell Carter Jr. (Chicago Bulls). I will own it: I was not high on Carter Jr. coming into the draft, but he has impressed in Las Vegas. As expected, he has a versatile and polished offensive game with a nearly unstoppable turnaround from the post, ability to score with either hand, range on his jumper, plus he is a surprisingly good passer. The book on him coming into the draft was defensive questions, but he has been better on that front than expected — he works hard and is athletic enough to be disruptive. We will see how he fares against NBA-level competition on that end, but the work ethic and tools are there.

8) Harry Giles (Sacramento Kings). He was a low-risk gamble pick by the Kings at No. 20 in 2017, a guy who was maybe the top player in his class as a high school sophomore until the injuries hit (ACL, MCL and a meniscus tear in his left knee, plus another surgery on his right knee). The Kings took him and red-shirted him last season, but in Vegas he has been impressive and solid (12 points and 7 rebounds a game in Sin City). He looks like he could be a rotation NBA big man (at least, the Kings think he can be more than that), someone Sacramento can count on besides Marvin Bagley III. Giles has been a pleasant surprise.

9) Jordan Bell (Golden State Warriors). He’s only on this list for one reason. Yes, he’s looked good in limited Summer League run — the guy was playing serious minutes in the NBA Finals a month ago, of course he looks good going against a bunch of non-NBA players. What got him there was this one moment against the Jazz.

(To be clear, Bell and Donovan Mitchell are tight, and Mitchell thought this was funny.)

10) De'Anthony Melton (Houston Rockets). He could end up being a second-round steal for the Rockets. Melton didn’t play last season at USC (he was the guy at the heart of the FBI probe) so he slid down to 46th overall. In Vegas he has looked like a quality rotation guard, averaging 16.3 points, 7 rebounds, and 2.7 steals a game. Guard minutes are tight to come by on the Rockets this season, but he’s going to make the opening night roster and will get his shot.

Report: Jazz re-signing Derrick Favors for two years, $36 million

AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki
2 Comments

Update: Tony Jones of The Salt Lake Tribune:

That makes what looked like a slight overpay by the Jazz far better. They’re paying extra this year, when they have money to spend, for more flexibility next year — when they might need it.

 

The Jazz have been grappling with fitting Rudy Gobert and Derrick Favors, two fairly traditional bigs, together offensively for years.

That will remain a challenge in Utah.

Shams Charania:

This is reasonable value for Favors, 26. I’m not sure he could have gotten more elsewhere, but the Jazz – firmly in the mix in the loaded Western Conference – didn’t want to lose the talented player in unrestricted free agency.

Gobert and Favors form a stout tandem defensively and on the glass. Even though neither spaces the floor well, they’ve learned how to position themselves to minimize the downside of their pairing. Donovan Mitchell‘s ability to get buckets in tight spaces certainly helps, allowing Utah to keep the defensive presences on the floor together.

Favors will also slide to center when Gobert sits. That’s Favors’ best position in a vacuum, and he can play with a more modern power forward like Jae Crowder, Jonas Jerebko or Thabo Sefolosha.

The Jazz might prefer someone who fits better with Gobert, but they weren’t going to get a better overall player than Favors. So, this works just fine.

Ben Simmons wins NBA Rookie of the Year

21 Comments

It was a real debate.

Donovan Mitchell came out of nowhere to lead the Utah Jazz to the playoffs. Jayson Tatum came out strong, then reminded everyone during the playoffs (which was after the voting) how well he fit what Boston was doing.

But in the end, Ben Simmons of the Philadelphia 76ers won the NBA Rookie of the Year award.

Simmons brought a real all-around game: 15.8 points, 8.1 rebounds, and 8.2 assists per game, plus he played excellent defense. He looked every bit the future All-NBA player, and he was racking up rookie triple-doubles like he was Magic Johnson.

Simmons had 90 of the 101 first-place votes cast by select media members. Donovan Mitchell came in second and had the other 11 first-place votes. After that, it was Jayson Tatum, Kyle Kuzma, and Dennis Smith Jr. receiving votes.

With momentum gone and interest down, NBA finally will give out awards tonight

Associated Press
4 Comments

When the NBA season ended, there was a passionate debate going on about the end-of-season awards.

Ben Simmons or Donovan Mitchell for Rookie of the Year? James Harden was the MVP favorite, but what about LeBron James and his monster season? Did Rudy Gobert play enough games to win Defensive Player of the Year? Not only was picking the Coach of the Year hard, narrowing the list down to three for the ballot out of the seven or eight candidates was brutal.

NBA fans — and NBA Twitter — had roiling debates over all those topics. Fans backed their man and defended their positions and media members who announced their votes — as we did — had to defend those choices. As they/we should.

That was mid-April.

Now, the NBA fandom has moved on — the Finals are over, the draft just happened, and everyone’s focus is on free agency and the possibility of a Kawhi Leonard trade and where he might land.

So now, finally, more than two months after the regular season ended, the NBA will get around to giving out its awards at its second annual awards banquet Monday night (televised on TNT, starting at 9 p.m. ET). The league will hand out the official awards for MVP, Rookie of the Year, Coach of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year, Most Improved, Sixth Man of the Year, Executive of the Year (voted on by other executives), and a series of fan-voted awards (Best Style, Dunk of the Year, Block of the Year, Clutch Shot of the Year, Assist of the Year and Handle of the Year). Those are all regular season awards, with ballots from the media-voted awards due before the playoffs started.

The league needs to do something about the timing of the awards show, they have lost all momentum getting around to it now.

I get it, the NBA wants a big awards event and broadcast that can be televised (the league just used to announce them during the playoffs via press release, with the recipients getting the award at a playoff game in their home arena, if there was still one). The NFL does a great awards show, but they have a natural (if too long) two-week break between the AFC/NFC finals and the Super Bowl, which allows them to have their event at the peak of interest for the sport.

The problem for the NBA these are regular season awards now given out 10 weeks after the regular season ended.

The NBA is entering the phase of the calendar that is its most popular — free agency. The draft draws interest as the unofficial start of this off-season, as teams start to reshape their roster. Trades and player movement — and the rumors and breakdowns around them — draw more interest than the NBA Finals or the games themselves (just check the traffic at any NBA website, including ours). Fans of all 30 teams are invested in playing armchair GM and, along with the media, second guessing every move they make to build that roster. (By the way, that second guessing is just part of the job for a GM, they can’t have family members on burner Twitter accounts trying to defend them.)

There’s no easy answer here for the NBA as to the timing of the awards show. There isn’t much of a gap between the end of the regular season and the playoffs and pretty much every player or coach who will win an award is prepping for the postseason at that point, they don’t want to fly to Los Angeles (this year) or New York (last year) for chummy banquet with their soon-to-be rivals. As this year showed, when the conference finals run seven games there isn’t much of a gap there before the Finals start (and again, key players will be involved in the Finals every year).

Where the league has the show now is the most convenient place on the calendar.

It’s just too late. The momentum of the regular season is gone, the attention of fans has turned to free agency, and this just feels like an odd break.

But Monday night the NBA is getting around to it. And we can try to revive old debates, they will just die out fast in the wake of free agency talk.

 

Have questions leading up to free agency? Submit your questions via e-mail for our PBT Mailbag feature. Drop us a line at pbtmailbag@gmail.com.

Draymond Green says Andrew Bogut taught him how to play NBA defense

Getty Images
5 Comments

Andrew Bogut was the anchor of the 2015 champion Golden State Warriors — and if he doesn’t get injured halfway through the 2016 Finals that may have turned out differently as well. The Australian big man was never a high flier who came screaming in from the weakside to block a shot into the third row, rather he was just smart — always in the right position, always reading the play well, anticipating, and being one step ahead of the offense and shutting off lanes to the basket.

Bogut joined the Warriors for the 2012-13 season, the same season they brought in one Draymond Green.

Green credited Bogut with teaching him how to play NBA defense, speaking to Utah Jazz rookie Donovan Mitchell in an interview for ABC/ESPN (which is broadcasting The Finals).

“I’ll never forget it,” Green said. “My first day out at Golden State he was teaching me different things you could do that you couldn’t do in college and throughout the course of that year just teaching me positioning.

“I wouldn’t be half the defender I am without Andrew Bogut. He taught me so much about defence that I owe all my success to him, defensively.”

Green has had a lot of success — the 2017 NBA Defensive Player of the Year, three-time NBA All-Defense, and his post defense and rim protection anchor the small ball lineups that have propelled the Golden State Warriors to two NBA titles. Green is athletic and strong, but like Bogut it’s his ability to read the play and anticipate that makes him special.