DeMarcus Cousins

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Report: Lakers receive DeMarcus Cousins disabled-player exception

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A chance at a championship. LeBron James. Anthony Davis. The Los Angeles market. Great weather.

The Lakers can offer plenty to anyone who gets bought out this season.

Now, the Lakers – who lost DeMarcus Cousins to a torn ACL – get a mechanism to offer post-buyout players more money.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

The exception holds little value presently. It’s worth less than a full-season minimum salary for anyone with more than four years experience.

But minimum-salary and mid-level exceptions decline throughout the season. This exception does not.

So, on March 1, a team with only a minimum slot available can offer a free agent just between $233,459 and $666,546 (depending on the player’s experience level). The Lakers can offer $1.75 million.

This means an NBA-appointed doctor ruled Cousins is “substantially more likely than not” to be out through June 15. Given that prognosis, the Lakers could open a roster spot by waiving Cousins, who’s on a one-year deal and facing a domestic-violence charge. They’d still keep the exception.

If Cousins can return more quickly than expected, he’d be eligible to play, whether or not the Lakers use the exception.

Wizards GM has no plan to trade Bradley Beal: ‘Every team would love to have him, and we do’

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Bradley Beal is the next potential big trade piece in the NBA — and in a league that thrives on drama and big player moves, fans and pundits are drooling. The Wizards put a three-year, $111 million contract in front of Beal this summer and he chose not to sign it (at least not yet), which led to even more calls from the outside for another dramatic NBA trade.

Inside the Wizards, that has never been on the table. Beal still has two years on his contract and has not demanded out (we’ll get to that, keep reading). Teams call, and newly-minted Wizards general manager Tommy Sheppard shoots them down. Why? Because he wants to build around 25-year-old Beal as he moves into his prime, not start over. Here is what Sheppard told Brad Botkin of CBSSports.com.

“The way that I look at this is pretty simple: If you were looking to build a team, Brad would be the type of player anyone would want to start with,” Sheppard told CBS Sports. “You look at the character, the talent, the age, just the whole package … Brad is without a doubt a core player in this league. Every team would love to have him, and we do. So we’ve never considered anything other than a situation where Brad is with us and leading us forward. We made that clear to him on the first day we could offer him an extension, and we’ll continue to make that clear.”

Right now, Beal is not available, and that does not seem likely to change. For now.

There are two parts to the question of trading Beal: What Beal himself wants, and what the team should do.

Beal hasn’t asked for a trade and nobody should expect him to, and there are 250 million reasons for that. Beal wants a supermax extension ($250 million over five years), but to get that he would need to be named to an All-NBA team — he came in seventh in the guard voting last season, but only six make All-NBA (two guards each for the first, second, and third teams). Beal, with John Wall out this season after his torn Achilles, is going to have the ball in his hands a lot and is going to put up numbers — there is a legitimate chance he makes All-NBA next season. Then he becomes supermax extension eligible. However, if he gets traded Beal is no longer eligible for that extra five percent of the salary cap (only the Wizards can offer it). Beal doesn’t want to go anywhere, and don’t expect him to rack up DNP-Rest games either (he played a full 82 the last two seasons). Beal has his goal set.

Do the Wizards want to pay Beal that much and be committed to him for that long? That is the bigger question.

Is this a case, as we have seen with other teams, where Washington will balk at that payday for that player and decide to make a trade (ala the Kings and DeMarcus Cousins). The Wizards would get a lot back in a Beal trade — you’ve seen the haul for Paul George, Anthony Davis, and other elite players — and it would jumpstart a rebuild.

Right now, Sheppard and the Wizards want to be in the Beal business, they have no plans to trade him. Calls continue to be turned away. If, come the trade deadline, it looks like Beal is on track to make All-NBA then the real test comes for the Wizards: Are they $250 million worth of committed to Beal? Maybe the mind of management and ownership shifts when the money gets real.

Right now, however, Beal is a Washington Wizard and that’s not changing anytime soon.

Report: Lakers apply for disabled-player exception for DeMarcus Cousins

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The Lakers most directly replaced DeMarcus Cousins, who tore his ACL, with Dwight Howard.

Los Angeles might gain a mechanism to get an even better addition.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

The Lakers will receive the exception if an NBA-appointed doctor rules Cousins is “substantially more likely than not” to be out through June 15. Cousins tore his ACL last month. Los Angeles seemingly has a good chance of getting this extra spending power, though it’s not certain.

The exception (worth half Cousins’ salary) is worth less than the minimum for anyone with at least five years experience. But minimum-salary and mid-level exceptions decline throughout the season. The designated-player exception does not.

So, this could quite value after the trade deadline. LeBron James, Anthony Davis, the Los Angeles market and a larger salary would likely appeal to many veterans on the buyout market.

Jayson Tatum out at least five days for Team USA, will miss next two games

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Jayson Tatum sprained his ankle in the final seconds of Team USA’s overtime win against Turkey. However, he walked out of the USA locker room after without much of a limp, and Celtics’ coach Brad Stevens called the ankle sprain “moderate.”

That’s still enough to keep Tatum out at least five days — or two games — USA Basketball announced on Wednesday. John Schuhmann of NBA.com is in Shanghai with the team and broke it all down.

The first game Tatum misses is a meaningless game against Japan that the USA should win comfortably without him (the USA has already clinched its way to the second round, and Japan lost to the Czech Republic 89-76, that’s a Czech squad the USA beat by 21).

The second game he misses will be the start of the second round, and he could miss both games of that round.

(If you’re confused by the format, welcome to FIBA. Here’s how it works: There are four teams in each first-round group, with the top two teams from each group advancing to the second round. That second round is another four-team group made up of those top two teams — meaning in this case the USA and the winner of Turkey vs. the Czech Republic — and the top two teams from another group, however, your record from the first round carries over and the USA only plays the teams from the other group. Which for the USA means playing Brazil and probably Greece and Giannis Antetokounmpo. From that group, the top two teams advance to an eight-team knockout style tournament.)

Tatum has played a fairly important role for Gregg Popovich and Team USA, starting both games and averaging 24.5 minutes and 10.5 points a game. He was on the court at the end of regulation against Turkey when he was fouled on a three-point attempt with 0.1 seconds left and the USA down two (he hit two of the free throws to force overtime). In overtime he was on the court at the end again, getting fouled on the play that sprained his ankle.

The USA will miss Tatum’s length, scoring, and defense in the second round, especially against a step up in quality of opponents.

The good news for the Celtics is this does not look like the kind of injury that will linger into the season. Boston’s Stevens downplayed the risk of injury for guys playing for Team USA, noting that injuries can happen anywhere at any time (just ask DeMarcus Cousins).

 

DeMarcus Cousins charged with domestic-violence misdemeanor

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Lakers center DeMarcus Cousins has been charged with a domestic-violence misdemeanor after allegedly threatening to kill his ex-girlfriend.

The charge (third-degree harassing communications) was filed in Mobile, Ala., per the city’s records. Cousins faces both legal consequences and the NBA’s new domestic-violence policy.

Cousins and his ex-girlfriend reportedly argued about whether their son would attend his wedding. At one point in a call she claims was between her and Cousins, the voice on the other end said, “I’m going to make sure I put a bullet in your f—ing head.”

Sidelined by a torn ACL, Cousins was unlikely to contribute this season. How this case proceeds could significantly affect whether he plays in the NBA again.