DeMarcus Cousins on Warriors: ‘This was my nuclear bomb. My last resort.’

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A year before, DeMarcus Cousins was a lock max player, a guy the New Orleans Pelicans could not let get away. A guy with options. A guy about to make not just life-changing money but family generational changing money. DeMarcus Cousins was at his peak.

But on Jan. 30, everything changed. Cousins tore his Achilles tendon.

Come July 1, 2018, the phone was not ringing, team executives were not lined up at 12:01 to meet with Cousins and his agent. Crickets. There was nothing. The teams Cousins called were not making offers and were not interested — including the Pelicans.

So Cousins got in touch with Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry. The rest is history.

All through free agency and his recovery, SHOWTIME Sports has been making a documentary — titled “THE RESURGENCE: DeMarcus Cousins” — that will air on the cable network at a date and time yet to be announced. They just released the video above (WARNING: NSFW language) and if the access and honesty they got in this clip is any indication, it is going to be must watch.

Check out the fantastic video above, courtesy Showtime. And be ready for when this hits the airwaves (or streaming, for most of us).

Magic Johnson: Lakers will consult with LeBron on big moves

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This is what should happen with the NBA’s elite players. When the Warriors were thinking about adding DeMarcus Cousins to the roster this summer, they reached out to Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant for their opinion, then pulled the trigger after listening to feedback. It’s going to be that way with James Harden in Houston or Anthony Davis in New Orleans or…

LeBron James with the Lakers.

Magic Johnson confirmed as much, speaking to the media, as reported by Bill Oram of the Athletic.

This gets blown up by some fans into “LeBron is the GM” but he’s never wanted to be the final decision maker. Teams defer to his wishes at times, but that happened with Magic (just as Norm Nixon) and virtually every other superstar in the modern NBA. It’s part of the game.

The art is knowing where the boundaries are and when to overrule. Pat Riley did that well (for the most part) when LeBron was in Miami. In Cleveland, there were more misses than hits, although David Griffin (and to a degree Koby Altman) did well within the limitations.

Consulting LeBron is a must. It’s expected. Will Magic and Rob Pelinka be able to tell him “no” at the appropriate times? That remains to be seen. So far they have not impressed with the veterans brought in to go with LeBron (if you want to see executives from other teams laugh/roll their eyes, just bring up the Lance Stephenson/JaVale McGee signings).

Magic won the summer by getting LeBron, but that’s not even half the battle.

Adam Silver encourages Warriors to ‘increase their dominance’

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Privately, it seems like the NBA has been upset with the Golden State Warriors after they signed Kevin Durant. Grabbing a former league MVP to add to an already dominant team was something of a shock thanks to the jump in the salary cap a couple of years ago.

Now, the Warriors are NBA champions once again and it seems as though Durant will be with Golden State for a least a few more years. The team also recently added former star big man DeMarcus Cousins, who was having a good season with the New Orleans Pelicans last year until he ruptured his Achilles tendon.

Cousins isn’t likely to stick around after 2019, but at least on paper it seems as though the Warriors are the destination for big time players, all while their salary demands taking a backseat.

Now, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver says that the Warriors and their front office practices are in line with the league’s goals. Specifically, Silver said he thought it was okay for Golden State to try and increase their dominance after a season in which they took home the Larry O’Brien trophy quite easily.

Via Sports Illustrated:

“We want teams to compete like crazy,” Silver said. “I think the Warriors—within the framework of this deal—should be doing everything they can to increase their dominance. That’s what you want to see in a league. You want teams to compete in every way they can within the rules.

“I don’t necessarily think it’s per se bad that the Warriors are so dominant. As I’ve said before, we’re not trying to create some sort of forced parity. What we really focus on is parity of opportunity.”

The most interesting part of that quote was at the end of the first paragraph. Silver said he wants everyone to play within the rules. As the rules stand right now, Golden State is A-OK. But as we’ve seen with special circumstances in the past, it’s entirely possible the rules could change thanks to dire need within the league.

I personally think that’s a real possibility for the NBA moving forward. It’s no secret that the league would rather that Durant was not teamed up with the superstars on the Warriors, and guys taking a pay cut — or at least less than their expected value with regard to max salaries — is a real problem. LeBron James obviously got paid, but if this Warriors team is going to continue to have multiple players take the Dirk Nowitzki route and re-sign for less than market value in their primes, that’s a real problem for the competitive balance in the NBA.

Again, that’s my own personal projection with what I see happening within the league. The reality is there aren’t enough star players to fill two spots on each of the 30 NBA teams. The fact that some can choose to glom together (while socially just) isn’t in the best business interests of the NBA.

Then again, Cousins will be gone after next season and Durant could be on the Knicks after too long. Maybe this isn’t an issue, but no doubt Silver has been weighing his options in terms of guarding against superteams like Golden State in the future.

The number one way to combat that, in all honesty, is to fight harder for cap smoothing if the opportunity comes available next time out.

Warriors make it official, sign free agent forward Jonas Jerebko

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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Free agent forward Jonas Jerebko has signed with the two-time defending champion Golden State Warriors.

The Warriors announced the deal Thursday and planned to formally introduce Jerebko on Monday.

A native of Sweden, Jerebko has played nine NBA seasons with Utah, Boston and Detroit. In 32 postseason games – four starts – for the Jazz and Celtics, he has averaged 4.0 points and 3.1 rebounds.

Golden State had already added center DeMarcus Cousins in free agency and re-signed two-time reigning finals MVP Kevin Durant and forward/center Kevon Looney after winning a second straight title and third in four years. Centers JaVale McGee (Lakers) and Zaza Pachulia (Pistons) have departed.

Lakers insist they’re trying to compete with Warriors

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The Warriors were already historically great, and then they signed DeMarcus Cousins. If all goes well, they could be the greatest team of all-time. Their floor is championship favorite.

Plenty of teams seem content to wait out Golden State.

Does that include the Lakers?

They have LeBron James locked up three more years, and he doesn’t seem to be demanding urgency. Their other signings – Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, Rajon Rondo, Lance Stephenson and JaVale McGee – are for one-year deals designed to maximize long-term flexibility. Los Angeles hasn’t flipped any of its top young players – Brandon Ingram, Kyle Kuzma, Lonzo Ball and Josh Hart – or future first-round picks for immediate upgrades.

But the Lakers say they’ve designed this roster specifically to compete with the Warriors.

Lakers general manager Pelinka, via Ohm Youngmisuk of ESPN:

“If your goal is to win a championship, you’ve got to look at the way the champs are assembled and how you can give yourself the best chance to take them down,” Pelinka said of one of the many reasons for the construction of the Lakers’ current roster. “It is certainly part of the equation. … [President of basketball operations] Earvin [Johnson] and I had a conversation, and LeBron echoed this sentiment: I think to try to play the Warriors at their own game is a trap. No one is going to beat them at their own game, so that is why we wanted to add these elements of defense and toughness and depth and try to look at areas where we will have an advantage.”

“We did not want to go out and just sign specialists, ‘Oh, this guy can just shoot,'” Pelinka said. “We wanted tough two-way players that can defend with a level of toughness and also make shots. Listen, the road to the NBA championship has to go through the team that won last year, and we all know the guys up north have a special group. But one of the ways to attack what they have is with defensive toughness. I think we saw that in the Houston series with some of the players that Houston has.

This is intentionally different than the approach the Cavaliers took with LeBron. They prioritized offense and surrounded him with shooters. That left Cleveland short against Golden State the last couple years, and the Lakers are trying something different.

But the Lakers will run into the same problem the Cavs did: Their players just aren’t good enough. Rondo’s best defensive days are long behind him. Stephenson and McGee are good in moments, spacy in others. Caldwell-Pope is a good perimeter defender but struggles when switching inside or against bigger wings.

It’s not as much style as ability. The Rockets had way better players, which is why they came closer than anyone to beating the Kevin Durant Warriors in the playoffs.

The Lakers shouldn’t completely give up on this season. They have LeBron, and he alone gives them a chance. More importantly now, he provides the them a chance to build a more serious contender in future years.

But it’s tough to buy the Lakers’ stated plan for this season.