C.J. Miles

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Wizards: Ian Mahinmi out to begin regular season

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With John Wall and Isaiah Thomas injured, the Wizards have no backup point guard behind Ish Smith. The situation is even gloomier at small forward with C.J. Miles, Troy Brown and Admiral Schofield all banged up.

Add center to the list of positions where Washington is woefully thin.

Wizards release:

Wizards center Ian Mahinmi is out with a strained right Achilles tendon. He will be treated conservatively before being re-evaluated in six weeks.

Washington will play nine regular-season games in the next six weeks.

This leaves Thomas Bryant at center. He’ll provide plenty of activity, but he can’t do it alone. The Wizards have to play small, though some of their power forwards – Rui Hachimura, Davis Bertans and Moritz Wagner – might have to play small forward given the injury issues there. Plugging one hole creates another.

Hope is dissipating from a season that already contained little.

Wizards should have traded Bradley Beal

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NBC Sports’ Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.    

They should have traded Bradley Beal.

I’m reluctant to declare whether a team should or shouldn’t trade a player. It depends on so many factors outsiders don’t know. Mainly, what are other teams offering (or demanding in salary dumps)? The return (or cost in salary dumps) is essential to any trade evaluation.

But the Wizards should have traded Bradley Beal.

Beal is a young star locked up two more seasons and plays a position, shooting guard, in demand around the league. Look at the astronomical returns Anthony Davis and Paul George generated for the Pelicans and Thunder. It’s hard to believe Beal wouldn’t have fetched something similar.

Of course, Washington would like to build around Beal. Right now, he’s saying all the right things about staying.

But the Wizards will likely stink next season. After living through that experience, will Beal actually want to stay long-term? I would’ve rather traded him this summer with an additional season on his contract than wait to find out.

That was never in the cards, especially because Washington went through key portions of the offseason without a permanent front-office leader. That was a failure of Wizards owner Ted Leonsis. He fired Ernie Grunfeld in April and didn’t remove Tommy Sheppard’s interim title until mid-July, once free agency had quieted. This is a 365-day-a-year job. Washington missed opportunities.

Sheppard’s big move was drafting Rui Hachimura No. 9. I rated Hachimura No. 25 on my board. That could just be a difference of opinion. But I fear the Sheppard – unsure of his long-term status – gravitated toward the player with major marketing upside. If Hachimura struggles, it won’t matter that he’s Japanese.

Sheppard also re-signed Thomas Bryant (three years, $25 million) and sold that as a key step in keeping Beal. An enthusiastic young player, Bryant definitely helped Washington last season. But c’mon. He’s still Thomas Bryant.

Otherwise, the Wizards lost several rotation players via free agency – Trevor Ariza, Bobby Portis, Jabari Parker, Jeff Green and Tomas Satoransky (sign-and-traded to the Bulls for two second-rounders). That was tough on a team with limited mechanisms to add outside players. With John Wall’s high salary serving as a major block, Washington was capped out.

The Wizards had to get creative to form even this barely tolerable roster.

They used most of their mid-level exception on Ish Smith (two years, $12 million). He should be fine as a stop-gap starting point guard. However, I suspect many of contributions will come just through his professionalism amid a losing season.

Washington got Davis Bertans from the Spurs, who unloaded his salary before Marcus Morris reneged on San Antonio. The Wizards also dealt Dwight Howard for the more-functional, but slightly higher-paid C.J. Miles.

Isaiah Thomas was a worthy bet at the minimum, but hope is fading of him bouncing back. He’s already hurt again.

Washington jumped into the Anthony Davis trade when the Lakers wanted to clear cap space for a run at Kawhi Leonard. The Wizards got a second-rounder for taking Moritz Wagner, Isaac Bonga and Jemerrio Jones. Washington got another young prospect, No. 42 pick Admiral Schofield, for effectively taking $1 million of dead salary from the 76ers.

These new veterans likely aren’t good enough to get the Wizards anywhere. The new young players carry only limited promise.

Washington’s short- and long-term hopes rest mostly on Beal – as long as he accepts that burden.

Offseason grade: D+

Now what for Lakers after DeMarcus Cousins injury?

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“He was going to be a big part of what we’re going to do.”

Laker forward Kyle Kuzma summed it up well when asked about DeMarcus Cousins tearing his ACL during an off-season workout in Las Vegas this week. The Lakers were counting on a bounce-back season from Cousins — for him to play more like the guy from Game 2 of the NBA Finals against Toronto when he was vital to a Warriors win — because it would take some of the burden off of just-acquired Anthony Davis.

Make no mistake, Davis is the best center the Lakers have — he is arguably the best center in the game  (two seasons ago he was the First Team All-NBA center). However, Davis is not built like Joel Embiid and does not want to bang in the post for 30 minutes a night, he wants to play more at the four, face-up, run and space the floor, and play next to a traditional center (then slide to the five in certain situations/lineups, not unlike how the Warriors use Draymond Green at the five).

Cousins was to be that traditional center, and he already had chemistry with Davis from the time they played together in New Orleans.

Now, considering all his body has been through, it’s almost certain Cousins will miss the entire upcoming NBA season.

“I’m devastated for DeMarcus…” said Warriors coach Steve Kerr. “Injuries are a part of the game, but you are talking about a player who has now dealt with the two most feared injuries for NBA players — the Achilles and ACL — each knocking you out for an entire season… It’s unheard of.”

For Cousins, it means another year of hard-work rehab. It’s a grind that will understandably wear on him.

For the Lakers… the options are not pretty.

There is nobody readily available who can provide near the level of production they hoped to get from Cousins.

The Lakers are not going to make Davis play the five more — he does not want to, and while it’s a longshot he leaves as a free agent next summer he still has that leverage and the Lakers want and need to keep him happy.

So who are the Lakers best options? Right now they have JaVale McGee as a traditional center and that’s it. Remember, they also only have a minimum contract to offer.

The name that bounced around as speculation at the Lakers practice facility (where Team USA practiced this week) was Joakim Noah. The veteran played solidly last season in Memphis after New York wanted him out, and with the Grizzlies he played respectable defense while scoring 7.1 points a game on 51.6 percent shooting. Noah also is a good passer and smart player. He would fit with their veteran mindset, if LeBron James signed off on bringing Noah in.

Nene also is available as a free agent, but at age 37 he showed considerable decline the past couple of seasons in Houston. Marcin Gortat is another option here, he showed a decline at age 35 last season, but at this point the Lakers can’t be too picky. If the Lakers want a good pick-and-roll big, Salah Mejri has been that for Dallas in recent years.

The best available free agent is the Manimal, Kenneth Faried. He is 29 years old, always plays hard, and averaged 12.9 points per game on 58.7 percent shooting in 25 games for the Rockets last season after joining them mid-January. He picked up the slack until Clint Capela returned from injury, but once that happened Faried fell out of the rotation. The main reason for that, and for his limited playoff role, is that Faried is not much of a defender anymore. But he can get buckets.

Another name — one that sends shivers down the spines of Lakers fans — is Dwight Howard. He was traded to Memphis this summer for C.J. Miles and is expected to be bought out. If/when that happens, he has played solidly in recent years. When healthy. And that’s the bigger concern, Howard played just nine games for the Wizards last season. On a team where both LeBron and Davis are going to get a lot of nights off, the Lakers need role players they can count on to absorb minutes, and Howard is just not that guy.

The Lakers could look to the trade market — guys such as Nerlens Noel could eventually become available, Detroit may listen to offers for Christian Wood — however, Los Angeles does not have a lot to give up in a deal.

Bottom line, the options for the Lakers are not good. While the loss of Cousins does not take them out of contender status, it makes reaching their potential that much harder. The margin for error has shrunk again.

They will need to add someone at center, but at this point it’s a case of holding their nose and taking whatever they see as the best fit.

Reports: Wizards trading Dwight Howard to Grizzlies for C.J. Miles; Memphis to waive Howard

Associated Press
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The Wizards want to hit the reset button on their culture. The Memphis Grizzlies save a few million dollars.

That led the two sides to a trade that will send Dwight Howard to Memphis for C.J. Miles, with Memphis planning to waive Howard and make him a free agent. Shams Charania of The Athletic broke the trade and David Aldridge of The Athletic has the details.

This is an increasingly rare straight-up player-for-player trade.

Miles has been on the Wizards radar for a while now, but that’s not really what this trade is about. Washington’s management and ownership want to shift both the internal culture of the franchise and how they are perceived, and Howard was not part of that future.

Howard will be a free agent, but much like DeMarcus Cousins may find it tough going to get offers he likes. Part of that is due to injuries — Howard only played nine games for Washington last season — and part of it is the game moving away from the back-to-the-basket, post-up game Howard prefers. While Howard is a future Hall of Famer (he is, like it or not), he is not the player he was back when he was a perennial MVP candidate, and the game has evolved away from teams looking for his style of center play.

This is another trade for interim GM Tommy Sheppard, who is clearing the decks for either himself or whoever comes in next as the full-time GM.

For Memphis, they save $3.1 million. They also just waived Avery Bradley (as was expected), he was owed $12.1 million with a guarantee date of July 6 (Saturday). Bradley will get $2 million and become a free agent, one several teams are likely to chase.

All that cap space opened up keeps Memphis available for what they have wisely done all through this rebuild: Take on other team’s bad contract if some picks/young players are thrown in. Acquire assets and build from there. Memphis is taking on salary for what will be a bad team, but they are doing it wisely as part of the rebuild.

Report: Raptors trade Greg Monroe, second-rounder to Nets

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The Raptors traded three players (Jonas Valanciunas, Delon Wright and C.J. Miles) for Marc Gasol. Toronto traded Malachi Richardson without getting a player in return.

Apparently wanting to trim the roster even further, the Raptors are unloading Greg Monroe.

Shams Charania of The Athletic:

Teams are required to carry at least 14 players on standard contracts during the regular season. They can drop below that for two weeks at a time. So, the Raptors will fill their roster soon enough.

They just didn’t value Monroe on it.

Gasol replaces Valanciunas as Toronto’s top traditional center. Serge Ibaka will also continue to play plenty of center. So, Monroe’s spot on the depth chart didn’t really change.

But perhaps the Raptors believe they can upgrade on the buyout market. Several bigs should be available.

By trading rather than waiving Monroe, Toronto will get his entire salary removed from the luxury-tax computation. The cost is the second-round pick.

I’m not sure whether the Nets will keep Monroe. They could slot him behind Jarrett Allen and Ed Davis. But the prize was the second-round pick.