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Report: Suns will not pick up fourth-year option on Dragan Bender

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If you want to know what ultimately did in Ryan McDonough as the Suns’ general manager, go back to the draft of 2016.

At No. 8, the Sacramento Kings took Marquise Chriss for the Suns in a trade that sent the rights to  Bogdan Bogdanovic to the Kings — Bogdanovic made the NBA All-Rookie Second Team last season with 11.8 points per game while shooting 39.2 percent from three. (Georgios Papagiannis also went to Sacramento in that deal.) Chriss never panned out and was sent to Houston along with Brandon Knight for the aging Ryan Anderson last summer. The Rockets are not expected to pick up next year’s rookie contract option on Chriss. Phoenix struck out there.

At No. 4, McDonough and the Suns to Dragan Bender.

Tuesday it was announced the team will not pick up the option on his fourth season, still on his rookie contract. From Adrian Wojnarowski of ESPN.

The Suns will decline Bender’s option, freeing themselves of the $5.8 million salary that he would have been guaranteed in 2019-20, league sources said….

“Of course, I wished they picked up my option but I’m not going to let this stop me from reaching my goals,” Bender told ESPN in a text message.

The Suns’ new management is trying to move on from the mistakes of the past. As they should.

Last season the Suns tried to make it work with Bender, playing him in all 82 games and 25 minutes a night, but he was passive on offense and scored 6.5 points per game, with a PER of 7.1 (the kind of number that suggests a G-League player).

Bender (and Chriss) will be an unrestricted free agent next summer. The rest of this season he has to impress some team enough to take a flier on him (that may require some Summer League run, where Bender has not impressed in the past

Suns fire general manager Ryan McDonough

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Suns general manager Ryan McDonough signed Devin Booker to a max contract extension and drafted Deandre Ayton with the No. 1 pick this summer – two HUGE decisions for the franchise.

McDonough won’t even see those moves through for a single game.

Ben Golliver of Sports Illustrated:

The expected-to-be-awful Suns went a shocking 48-34 McDonough’s first year, but then produced straight losing seasons, winning in the mid-to-low 20s the last few years. Phoenix missed the playoffs all five years with McDonough. Nobody saw his job as secure, especially under Suns owner Robert Sarver.

But this timing is shocking, to say the least. Why let McDonough manage the entire offseason then fire him just nine days before the season? Is there something else happening here?

That said, I didn’t love McDonough’s summer. Phoenix made too many win-now moves while leaving a black hole at point guard that would undermine any chance of competing, especially in this brutal Western Conference.

And there was a history of errors. The 2016 draft looks like a particularly black mark on McDonough’s résumé. Phoenix picked Dragan Bender No. 4 then traded up for No. 8 pick Marquese Chriss while surrendering the Nos. 13 and 28 picks and rights to Bogdan Bogdanovic (who’s better than either Bender or Chriss). The Suns have already given up on Chriss, trading him to the Rockets, and Bender has looked lost.

But, again, why now? If Sarver believed in McDonough enough to let him handle all these big decisions earlier in the offseason, what changed?

Kings’ Bogdan Bogdanovic tweaks knee in FIBA qualifying; will have surgery

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This is why NBA teams don’t love it when their players go off to the national team over the summer.

Sacramento’s Bogdan Bogdanovic tweaked his knee playing for Serbia Monday, and now is going to have to have surgery on his left knee. It’s described as minor, but it’s still surgery. Here is the Kings’ release:

Sacramento Kings guard Bogdan Bogdanovic exited Serbia’s 91-65 World Cup Qualifying victory over Estonia on Monday after experiencing left knee discomfort early in the first quarter. Further evaluation revealed a minor injury to his left knee. On Monday, a minor arthroscopic procedure is scheduled at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, to be performed by Dr. Riley Williams. Bogdanovic is expected to make a full recovery and an update will be provided when it is available.

Bogdanovic had surgery on this same knee just after the season, and while this is considered less serious it’s still something to watch. Don’t expect to see him on the court preseason. The Kings have media day Monday and open training camp on Tuesday.

Bogdanovic, a 6’6″ sharp-shooting wing, averaged 11.8 points a game and shot 39.2 percent from three last season, making second-team All-Rookie.

Kings make neither friends nor progress

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

The good news for the Kings this offseason: They could do nearly no wrong (with one big exception). The bad news for the Kings this offseason: They could do nearly no right (with one big exception).

Yet, even in that stuck position, they still found ways to agitate a lot of people this summer.

Sacramento has been cripplingly impatient during its 12-year playoff drought, repeatedly falling for get-good-quick schemes that fell flat and left the team even less prepared to build up later. Among the worst was a 2015 salary-dump trade with the 76ers that cost the Kings their unprotected 2019 first-rounder (and forced Sacramento to swap the No. 3 pick with Philadelphia’s No. 5 pick last year).

But that mismanagement was also liberating this summer. The Kings will almost certainly be lousy again next year, but they can aim to be as good as possible without negative consequences. Signing hamstringing veterans like they did last offseason would have been far more reasonable this year. So would prioritizing youth despite not receiving the bonus tanking benefit. It’s all whatever.

Sacramento didn’t have a quiet offseason, though – at least not to those crossing paths with the combustible franchise.

The most consequential move was draft Marvin Bagley III No. 2 over Luka Doncic, seemingly the preferred choice among Kings fans. I would have picked Doncic, and I definitely wouldn’t have picked Bagley. Sacramento’s understood rationale – Bagley wanting to be there – is especially discouraging.

Maybe Bagley will turn out better than Doncic. Even picks made for poor reasons sometimes turn out. But I’m not a believer, and I sure don’t envy Kings fans trying to talk themselves into Bagley after getting their hopes up for Doncic.

Sacramento also signed Zach LaVine to a four-year, $78 million offer sheet that – fortunately for the Kings – Chicago matched. The deal will likely be a thorn in the Bulls’ side, but they probably weren’t eager to lose a key piece of their Jimmy Butler-trade return for nothing.

From there, Sacramento moved onto players who already agreed to terms with other teams, poaching Nemanja Bjelica from the 76ers and Yogi Ferrell from the Mavericks. Those defections reflect worse on the players, but this sure wasn’t a way for the Kings to endear themselves around the league.

Guaranteeing a 30-year-old Bjelica $13,325,000 over the next two years with a third season unguaranteed at $7.15 million seems about fair. It’s not certain he’ll hold positive trade value, but he might, and Sacramento didn’t necessarily have a better use for that money.

I like the Ferrell signing more. The Kings had plenty of room to get value while out-bidding the absurdly team-friendly contract he agreed to with Dallas. Sacramento will pay him $3 million next season and got an unguaranteed season tacked on.

Between all their incitement, the Kings provided comic relief by trading for Ben McLemore – whom they once drafted No. 7, never significantly developed, never traded then let leave in free agency without even a qualifying offer extended. It was actually part of a larger trade that worked well for Sacramento, netting a 2021 Grizzlies second-rounder for Garett Temple, an overpaid but still productive 32-year-old. Temple, McLemore and the other involved player – Deyonta Davis – are all are on expiring contracts. The second-rounder helps the Kings far more than Temple would’ve. McLemore returning to Sacramento is just a humorous side effect.

Even funnier: Vlade Divac declaring the Kings are a “super team, just young.” It’s hard to see a super team – present or future – in Bagley, De'Aaron FoxBogdan Bogdanovic, Buddy Hield, Willie Cauley-Stein, Harry GilesSkal Labissiere and Justin Jackson.

But that won’t be judged yet, and Bagley was the only core player added this summer. It’s especially too soon to evaluate him fully. In these grades, I’m reluctant to assign much credit or blame for draft picks who’ve yet to play in the NBA.

They took an adventurous route, but in an offseason where the Kings had the No. 2 pick and little else to change their fortunes, the Kings used essentially only the No. 2 pick to change their fortunes. We don’t yet what that’ll mean, but this grade reflects at least a little bit of my Bagley skepticism.

Offseason grade: C-

Kings select Marvin Bagley III with No. 2 overall pick in 2018 NBA Draft

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The Sacramento Kings have made a sensible pick in the 2018 NBA draft. After the Phoenix Suns selected DeAndre Ayton No. 1 overall, it was up to the Kings to do something that wouldn’t set their franchise back.

Despite rumors that Sacramento had began to favor Michael Porter Jr., on Thursday night. the Kings took Duke University standout Marvin Bagley III.

Adding Bagley to their rotation of young, switchable wing players was a solid move for Sacramento. Bagley measures in at 6-foot-11 and 234 pounds, making him a power forward for the Kings.. He will likely need to learn for a year behind veteran Zach Randolph, and should be an interesting addition to the frontcourt of Willie Cauley-Stein, Harry Giles, and Skal Labissiere.

The Phoenix, Arizona native was a scorer for the Blue Devils during his one year in college, nabbing ACC Player of the Year honors as a freshman while scoring 21 points per game.

The Kings have a slate of young guard prospects as well, including Buddy Hield, De’Aaron Fox, and Bogdan Bogdanovic.

Sacramento hasn’t won more than 35 games since the 2007-2008 season, and no doubt they are expecting that Bagley will add a scoring punch to their young core. More than anything, Sacramento needs this pick to go somewhat right as they continue to try to rebuild after the Isaiah Thomas / DeMarcus Cousins era.