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Charles Barkley says Warriors won’t make Finals without Kevin Durant

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I vacillate back and forth on whether Charles Barkley is a genius or a complete goober. On one hand, Barkley’s comments on TNT broadcasts are often the thing that gets folks around social media talking, and indeed posts like this written about him. From a media executive perspective, Barkley is a gold mine that creates ratings.

Then again, the very thing that makes Barkley’s comments noteworthy is what makes them so inauspicious.

Just listen to what Barkley had to say on Thursday about the possibility of Kevin Durant leaving the Golden State Warriors this offseason.

Via Twitter:

If you’re unable to watch the video above, the idea that Barkley put forth was that if Durant decides to leave the Golden State Warriors, the team will no longer be contenders.

Not just “worse” or “not as good” according to ol’ Chuck. Without Durant, Barkley thinks the Warriors won’t be one of the teams angling for the Finals in the seasons to come.

If you’re a fan of the NBA, or Basketball-Reference.com, or, I don’t know, Googling things, this is patently crazy. Golden State won 73 games before the arrival of Durant, and won the 2014-15 NBA championship without him. They looked unstoppable before Durant, and the former Oklahoma City Thunder star joined Golden State because that’s how he could win a championship. He needed them, not the other way around.

It’s been clear for some time that Stephen Curry — not Durant, or Draymond Green, or Klay Thompson, or Andre Iguodala — is the fundamental building block of this team. In fact, as of publication we’re in the midst of a projected 10-game absence for Stephen Curry due to a hamstring issue. In three missed games the Warriors have lost to the Los Angeles Clippers and played a tight game with the Atlanta Hawks at home at Oracle. They just don’t look the same.

Which brings us back to Chuck.

The great sports loudmouths of our time (pick your favorite, really) all get paid to do what they’re best at in this Era of Hot Takes: state an opinion that’s patently untrue and watch the reaction to it spread like wildfire, all while retaining enough plausible deniability that media executives aren’t forced to issue public apologies or worse, see ratings fall.

This is why I choose to believe that Barkley is one of the best commentators out there from a national, target demo perspective. Execs have to love the guy. Here we are, writing another story about How Chuck Said Some Thing Crazy, and the cycle can continue. Durant will go to the Knicks or the Lakers. The Warriors will be in the Finals again in 2020. And nobody will care about Chuck’s old takes. I think I can feel the wrinkles of my brain smoothing over.

Warriors suspend Draymond Green for postgame comments in locker room

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The play itself that sparked everything was ugly.

With :06 seconds left in a tie game against the Clippers Monday night, watch Draymond Green grab the rebound and try to go the length of the court for the game-winner himself — only to fumble the ball away without a shot — while Kevin Durant, who should take that shot (or the hot Klay Thompson at that point), claps his hands and calls for the ball.

On the bench after that play got uglier with an argument between Green and Durant where Green allegedly even called KD his “b****” before Andre Iguodala and DeMarcus Cousins stepped in as peacemakers. In the locker room later the argument continued and was nasty as there has been in this era of the Warriors. It wasn’t just Durant, a lot of players questioned and called out Green’s decision, while Green defended himself angrily, and questioning KD on his free agency next summer.

All of it crossed a line, and Green has been suspended for a night and will sit against Atlanta, without pay.

From Chris Haynes at Yahoo Sports:

Green repeatedly called Durant “a bitch” after he was called out by the two-time NBA Finals MVP in the huddle for not passing him the ball, sources said. The organization is of the belief that Green cut too deep in his disagreement with Durant, sources said.

Klay Thompson, who is typically reserved, spoke up in the locker room to the surprise of his teammates about the altercation and stressed the importance of sticking together, sources said.

Durant is not making his free agency decision — he is expected to opt out of the last year of his contract before July — based on this one incident. But it seems to point to an overall tension around the team as it knows it could be the last year of this specific Warriors team.

Long term, Durant and Green will get over it — they had public arguments before then were hanging out at a baseball game together the next night. They will put it behind them.

But it’s just something to remember come next July.

Three Things to Know: Stephen Curry strains groin as injuries start to hit Warriors

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Stephen Curry leaves game with a groin strain, injuries mount as Bucks blowout Warriors. It’s the one thing most likely to derail the Warriors championship train: Injuries. And they are starting to hit the Warriors. Shaun Livingston remains out with a foot issue, and Andre Iguodala is limited by back and neck issues, for example.

Draymond Green was out Thursday night as the Milwaukee Bucks came to Oracle Arena and that mattered. On defense, they needed him to slow Giannis Antetokounmpo… as much as anyone is going to slow the Greek Freak right now. The Warriors couldn’t and Antetokounmpo dropped Green’s jaw like he was in a Tex Avery cartoon.

Antetokounmpo had 19 points, seven rebounds by the half and finished with 24 points on 16 shots, plus nine boards in a 23-point Bucks win, 134-111. The Warriors also missed Green on offense — he is by far the best screen setter on the Warriors and without him Stephen Curry and others couldn’t find the space they are used to against the length of the Bucks.

Then this happened.

Curry soon left the game with what is officially a strained left adductor, which is the groin muscle to the rest of us. Steve Kerr said there will be an MRI on Friday to figure out the severity. Groin strains (like hamstrings) can linger, and players can think they are healed when they are not, then re-injure them in the heat of competition. Which is to say, this early in the season the Warriors are going to be exceedingly cautious.

For the Bucks, this was a “take us seriously, we are contenders” game. Off to a 9-2 start this season they have the best net rating in the league — besting opponents by 12.9 points per 100 possessions, with the second-ranked offense and fourth-ranked defense in the league. They have the necessary superstar in the Greek Freak, and now quality talent around him — Eric Bledsoe was a problem for Stephen Curry all night, Kris Middleton is for real, their bigs Brook Lopez and Ersan Ilyasova can space the floor, and the list goes on and on — to be a threat. Mike Budenholzer is using all that talent properly, with floor spacing on offense and a more conservative defense than Jason Kidd ran.

Bottom line, when you talk the best in the East, the Bucks need to be mentioned with Boston and Toronto.

Golden State is still the gold standard in the NBA, the team everyone needs to beat, and a November win does not vault the Bucks past them. The Warriors did not treat this like a playoff game, they did not adjust like they would (in the Finals). But the nagging injuries are catching up with the Warriors, and with Golden State focused on April and beyond — not November — expect them to be slow bringing guys back from injury, and to get other stars rest. The Warriors have been here before, they know how to handle this, but it will cost them some wins as they focus on the long term.

2) Boston comes from 22 down to beat the struggling Suns on the road. Every time I looked in on this game and saw the score with the Celtics down by 15 or 20, I kept saying “the run is going to come.” Except, it never really did, when Devin Booker hit a floater with 3:45 to play in the game the Suns were up 14 (94-80).

That’s when the run came. Which was capped off by former Sun Marcus Morris — the guy bitter at the franchise for splitting up he and his brother — draining a three to tie.

After the game, Suns coach Igor Kokoskov said he had instructed the Suns to foul on that final play and force the Celtics to shoot two free throws. They had a chance When Morris first had the ball 35 feet out with his back to the basket, they had a chance when he first handed off to Kyrie Irving, and the Suns didn’t follow their coach’s instruction. Then they left (and didn’t rotate over to) a shooter at the arc and… that’s how you blow a three-point lead in the final seconds.

Kyrie Irving took over in OT and the Celtics got the win, 116-109. Kyrie Irving had 39, Devin Booker 38. Just remember, this was the easy game on the Celtics’ road trip West.

3) Carmelo Anthony returned to Houston and… that looked familiar. And ugly. The Thunder were without Russell Westbrook. Houston had won three in a row, all on the road, they had James Harden and Chris Paul healthy and were starting to feel themselves…

And Thursday night was all Thunder. OKC’s defense was sharp, but mostly the Rockets were off — Paul and Harden combined to shoot 11-of-30. As a team, Houston shot just 37.8 percent from the floor. This continues a trend all season, the Rockets are just missing shots. Houston leads the league with 41.9 threes attempted per game, 47.5 percent of their total shots, but they are 25th in shooting percentage from deep at 32.7 percent.

Nobody in a Rockets’ uniform was colder Thursday than Carmelo Anthony, who returned to OKC and shot 1-of-11 — a sight familiar to Thunder fans.

All of this led to a Thunder win — their seventh in a row — behind a balanced attack led by Paul George with 19 points. The Rockets can chalk this one up to just an off shooting night… but there have been a lot of those in this 4-6 start.

Warriors get rings, still have Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant and that’s too much for OKC

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For Oklahoma City, this game was encouraging. Paul George had 27 points and five assists, pushing the Thunder in the second half, but that was almost expected with Russell Westbrook out (still recovering from off-season knee surgery). What was more encouraging was Dennis Schroder‘s 21 points, 9 rebounds, and six assists, he is going to be a valuable shot creator for this team off the bench. It was encouraging to see Steven Adams looking solid with 17 points and 11 boards. It was encouraging to see a couple of threes from Alex Abrines off the bench. The Thunder put up a fight.

However, there are no moral victories.

The Warriors won on opening night in Oakland and it didn’t even feel like they had to break a sweat.

Stephen Curry dropped 32 points, reminded everyone he is a master of getting space for his shot off the pick-and-roll, and he hit five threes. Kevin Durant had 27 points and was the guy who took on the defensive responsibility for George much of the night (and did an okay job, but struggled following him on off-ball picks). And the new center combination of Damian Jones (12 points on 6-of-7 shooting, three blocked shots) and Kevon Looney (10 points, good game on both ends and was +22) held down the center spot reasonably well.

It was a good night for the Warriors. First they got their championship rings.

Then started out the season with a 108-100 win.

The one concern for the Warriors was Andre Iguodala leaving the game in the second quarter with what was described as a tight left calf, and he did not return.

Mostly though, the Warriors won this game the way they will win a lot more this season — because they have more talent than the team they are playing and can overwhelm them. Klay Thompson was cold (1-of-8 from three, but it doesn’t matter if one of the scorers goes cold because another one will step up. That was Curry.

The game was a bit sloppy, as first games of the season tend to be. But for both teams, there were good takeaways, positives they can build on as they go through the remaining 81 games.

It’s just the Warriors have a lot more talent on the roster, so they start 1-0.

Warriors’ Andre Iguodala says he doesn’t see himself as potential Hall of Famer

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Warriors forward Andre Iguodala won an NBA Finals MVP, putting him in company with 19 Hall of Famers, eight sure-fire future Hall of Famers, Kawhi Leonard (who’s on a Hall of Fame track if he remains healthy), Chauncey Billups (a potential Hall of Famer) and Cedric Maxwell.

So, that brings Iguodala into conversations he wouldn’t otherwise appear in.

Ray Ratto of NBC Sports Bay Area:

But when asked Monday at Warriors Media Day if he thought of himself as a potential Basketball Hall of Famer, he smiled for a moment, then got serious and gave the answer so few athletes would.

“I don’t.”

“I know some guys who belong that aren’t there, some guys who are in there but aren’t better than guys who aren’t,” he said. “But me, I don’t.

“That’s not part of my motivation. You have to let things happen organically. You know what you put in to it. You try to sow some good seeds, and you hope you can reap the benefits of it.”

I agree with Iguodala. I’ve long given up on predicting who makes the Basketball Hall of Fame, an institution that treats lesser levels as equal to the NBA and has secretive voting procedures. But when I envision a Hall of Fame that properly honors NBA greats, Iguodala doesn’t make the cut.

He has had a very nice career, becoming one of the league’s smartest players. He makes the most of that basketball intelligence with versatility and strong team play. It’s not a coincidence he has helped Golden State win three titles.

But he has also made only one All-Star team and never made an All-NBA team. He was never elite at any single point, and several years of good performance don’t compensate for that.

LeBron James should have won 2015 NBA Finals MVP. If voters felt obligated to choose a winning Warrior, Stephen Curry should have won.

Good for Iguodala, who had a stellar series, to snag the award. But we shouldn’t compound the error by making the honor the centerpiece of his Hall of Fame candidacy. And after that Finals MVP, his Hall of Fame résumé looks pretty thin.