Allonzo Trier

Zion Williamson’s debut overshadowed after earthquake shuts down Summer League for night

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People are going to talk about Zion Williamson‘s NBA Summer League debut for a long time.

Not just because he took Kevin Knox‘s lunch money and threw down a dunk.

But rather because an earthquake — a 7.1 quake centered in Ridgecrest, Calif., a city basically halfway between Los Angeles and Las Vegas — shook the Thomas & Mack center where the game was being played, causing the massive overhead scoreboard and speakers to sway, and pushing NBA and Summer League officials to call off the rest of the games for the night.

The Knicks/Pelicans game has 7:53 left to go in the fourth quarter was eventually declared a final with the Pelicans winning 80-74. The late game in the Thomas & Mack, the Suns vs. Nuggets, was canceled.

The games in the smaller Cox Center next door, which seats about 5,000 and feels more like a mid-major college arena, continued for a while because it does not have the same overhead scoreboard. However, those games were eventually called off as well.

Ridgecrest is a city that had a 6.4 magnitude earthquake just days before. While the town itself is relatively small (fewer than 30,000) the rolling quake could be felt from Los Angeles to Las Vegas. When the quake hit, the Thomas & Mack center largely emptied out.

However, it had already started to empty out earlier after word began to get around Williamson was not playing in the second half of the game against New York because of a knee-to-knee collision in the first half. The Pelicans chose to sit him out of an abundance of caution (as they should, this is just Summer League).

The much-hyped debut showdown between No. 1 pick Williamson and No. 3 pick R.J. Barrett had both players looking like rookies who have work to do to reach their potential. Which is exactly what we should have expected, but also not what fuels the hype machine before the game.

Williamson’s Summer League debut finished with him having 11 points on 4-of-9 shooting — all four of his makes were dunks — plus he went 3-of-6 from the free throw line and had three boards. Also, for the record, he walked into the building wearing Puma’s but played in his Duke Nikes.

There were good things and highlights from Williamson — when he got a little bit of room he exploited it and showed the potential that had scouts drooling all season. He’s strong and aggressive.

Williamson’s jump shot also is a work in progress, it’s a low and slow release that led to his first three being short and later Mitchell Robinson blocking a three, which led to a run-out dunk. On the other end, Williamson’s defensive recognition was slow at times, as is to be expected with a rookie in his first game.

You can see why Williamson needs to work on the jump shot to round out his game. When Robinson guarded him, Williamson blew by the Knicks center and got to the rim, but Robinson started to play back and dare Williamson to take jumpers. It was kind of the Giannis Antetokounmpo treatment, and it worked on Zion.

Knicks No. 3 pick R.J. Barrett struggled even more, finishing the night 4-of-18 shooting including 1-of-8 from three. Barrett struggled to create separation and get his shot off how he wanted, while on the other end Frank Jackson took it right at Barrett and scored 30 points for the game (before it was postponed).

Nobody should read much into those performances, Summer League itself just sets a baseline for the coaching staffs to understand what the players need to work on the rest of the summer. One game at Summer League means next to nothing for a player. Last Summer I was at Trae Young‘s Summer League debut in Salt Lake City and struggled mightily, but by the end of the Las Vegas Summer League Young looked much better, and by the end of the NBA season he was pushing for Rookie of the Year.

The standouts for the Knicks were their second-year players Allonzo Trier (21 points on 8-of-14 shooting), Kevin Knox (17 points on 6-of-12 shooting, including a couple of plays where he attacked Zion and scored), and Mitchell Robinson (8 points, 10 rebounds, and four blocks — three of them on Williamson). It was evident how much more slowly the game moved for them.

At least until the shaking started.

Zion Williamson rips ball out of Kevin Knox hands, throws it down hard (VIDEO)

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Zion Williamson was up and down in his Summer League debut, getting his shot blocked by Mitchell Robinson three times in the first half alone. He looked like a rookie…

That’s not why you’re here — you want the highlights. Zion had those, too. But none like ripping the ball out of Kevin Knox hands and throwing it down.

That is a man’s move.

It was some payback for a Knox strip of Williamson earlier.

Williamson was putting on a show in warmups, too.

Zion had 11 points in the first half, and was sat the second half by the Pelicans in a conservative move after some knee to knee contact in the first half. (Fans may not like it, but that’s what teams should do here, this is just Sumer League.)

The Knicks with three players who got regular NBA minutes last season — Allonzo Trier, Mitchell Robinson, and Knox — controlled the game.

Report: Reggie Bullock agrees to join Knicks on two-year, $21 million contract

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At the trade deadline, the Lakers sent out a young player they liked — Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk — to land more shooting in the form of Reggie Bullock.

Bullock is now taking his jump shot across the country to the New York Knicks, reports Shams Charania of The Athletic.

This is a nice pickup for the Knicks, Bullock is a guard who can shoot the rock (37.7 percent from three last year) and do a little bit of everything at the guard spot next to Dennis Smith Jr. (or off the bench in a rotation with Damyean Dotson and Allonzo Trier). Most of Bullocks’ shot attempts are from three, but that’s something New York could use.

Bullock doesn’t exactly make up for the day the Knicks had, but he is a nice get for where the team is right now.

Ten best players not taken in 2019 NBA Draft

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Fred VanVleet hounded Stephen Curry in the NBA Finals, hit big shots, and played an important role in the Toronto Raptors winning their first ever NBA title.

VanVleet was undrafted.

So was his teammate Jeremy Lin. And the Warriors’ Quinn Cook. Then there’s Seth Curry, Robert Covington, Kent Bazemore, Joe Ingles, Yogi Ferrell, Allonzo Trier, Jonathon Simmons, Langston Galloway, Matthew Dellavedova, Royce O'Neale, Maxi Kleber… and that’s just the tip of the iceberg of undrafted players making an impact in the NBA.

Who are the guys overlooked in the 2019 NBA Draft that teams may regret not snapping up? Here are our top 10:

Luguentz Dort, 6’4” shooting guard, Arizona State. He was the Pac 12 Freshman of the Year and his value at the next level is as a defender, he was tenacious as an on-ball guy (although not every scout is so sure about that). Some people thought he was a late first-round pick. What scared teams off? He’s a shooting guard who shot 30.7 percent from three last year. That has to improve (and reportedly has in workouts). OKC quickly locked him up after the draft.

He also has to become a better finisher at the rim, he was inconsistent there. But with his potential, it’s a surprise to see him go undrafted.

Naz Reid, 6’10” center, LSU. He has a world of potential, and while he’s a project big man, there were a lot of project bigs taken in this draft. Minnesota locked him up after the draft.

Reid can put the ball on the floor, shot better than 35 percent from three, has a good touch, and is the kind of big who could grab the board and bring the ball up himself. However, he seemed disinterested in defense (and occasionally offense) this season. Does he love basketball? That may have been the biggest reason he fell, but he has a chance to prove guys wrong.

Brian Bowen, 6’7″ wing, Sydney Kings. It didn’t take long after the draft for the Indiana Pacers to lock Bowen up.

Rather than play in college, Bowen went to Australia and played against men (and alongside Andrew Bogut). He’s got an NBA shooting touch, more confidence now, and knows how to play a physical game. It’s a surprise a team didn’t give him a shot before the Pacers.

Shamorie Ponds, 6’1” point guard, St. Johns. He’s got a lot of playground in his game, both for good and bad. He’s got impressive handles and uses that and some hesitation moves to get space and get to the rim or pull up for a jumper. After that, he’s got work to do. He has to get stronger, he has to be better at setting up teammates, his shot needs to be more consistent, and his defense needs to improve. A project, but if he puts in the work he could be a rotation guard in a few years.

DaQuan Jeffries, 6’5” wing, Tulsa. He has the raw tools to be a 3&D role player in the NBA — he’s very athletic, shooting range, he has a 7-foot wingspan — but it’s going to take a lot of development to get him there. Orlando is going to give him that chance.

Jeffries’ ball handling has to improve, and he has to be far more consistent. He had a good showing at the Portsmouth Invitational, which helped boost his draft stock, but just not enough.

Jontay Porter, 6’11” center, Missouri. The concern here is obvious — he has two ACL tears. He wasn’t the most athletic prospect to begin with, but the medical reports are the reason he fell out of the draft. Porter has skills as a shooter out to the arc and he plays a high IQ game, plus he fights hard for rebounds and tries on defense. Some team should bring him in this summer and give him a chance.

Terence Davis, 6’5” shooting guard, Mississippi. A guy who has moved up draft boards as the day got closer, but apparently not enough. He a good athlete he has been a decent shooter, if a bit streaky, but if he can become a more consistent shooter and add a little playmaking to his game, Davis can be a role player in the NBA. He’s got to improve his defense and accept a role, but if he can do that he can develop into a scorer off the bench in the league.

Louis King, 6’8” forward, Oregon. Teams see the potential for a stretch four in him, he shot 38.6% from three last season, but he’s just got to get stronger. He’s not quick enough to be a very switchable defender. That said, he can become a role player if he puts in the work — and that’s the big question. Reports have teams concerned about his work ethic and love of the game, and that likely doomed his chances. He has to repair that this summer.

Jalen Lecque, 6’4” guard, Brewster Academy. This is all about the potential. Lecque played last season at a prep school, not in college, he’s a top-shelf athlete with NBA wingspan (6’8.5”) who could be an impressive NBA defender. That’s why the Suns gave him a non-guaranteed contract.

Lecque is very, very raw, his shot isn’t there yet, the game seemed to move too fast for him at the Draft Combine, and there is a lot of development to do here. Still, gambling on a guy with athletic upside is a smart play.

Zach Norvell Jr., 6’5″ shooting guard, Gonzaga. In a league that needs shooting, Norvell can get red-hot and has ridiculous range. Yes, there were questions about his athleticism, and with that who he could defend, but considering who was taken it’s surprising to see a good shooter left on the sidelines.

• One Bonus note: Teams were not nearly as high on Tacko Falls as fans. Maybe he proves everybody wrong and pans out, but he has no range to his game. He’s an old-school style center in a league getting away from those kinds of players, and teams were concerned he cannot keep up with the pace of the NBA. This isn’t college where he can just be planted near the rim, plus he needs to get a lot stronger to compete inside in the NBA. He’ll get a Summer League invite, no doubt, but he has a lot of work to do to get where he wants to be.

First five picks of 2018 NBA draft make All-Rookie first team

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Remember the first five picks of last year’s draft?

1. Suns: Deandre Ayton

2. Kings: Marvin Bagley

3. Hawks (to Mavericks): Luka Doncic

4. Grizzlies: Jaren Jackson Jr.

5. Mavericks (to Hawks): Trae Young

A year later, and those same five players comprise the All-Rookie first team.

Here’s the full voting (first-place votes, second-place votes and voting points in parentheses):

First team

Luka Doncic, DAL (100-0-200)

Trae Young, ATL (100-0-200)

Deandre Ayton, PHO (95-5-195)

Jaren Jackson Jr., MEM (60-39-159)

Marvin Bagley III, SAC (56-44-156)

Second team

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, LAC (40-58-138)

Collin Sexton, CLE (39-54-132)

Landry Shamet, LAC (3-79-85)

Mitchell Robinson, NYK (3-71-77)

Kevin Huerter, ATL (1-43-45)

Also receiving votes: Mikal Bridges, PHO (1-29-31); Kevin Knox, NYK (0-22-22); Josh Okogie, MIN (1-10-12); Jalen Brunson, DAL (0-10-10); Allonzo Trier, NYK (0-10-10); Rodions Kurucs, BRK (0-9-9); Wendell Carter Jr., CHI (0-7-7); Miles Bridges, CHA (1-4-6); Bruce Brown, DET (0-2-2); Harry Giles III, SAC (0-2-2); Mo Bamba, ORL (0-1-1); Aaron Holiday, IND (0-1-1)

This is only the second time the top five picks all made the ensuing All-Rookie first team. The other: 1984-85, when the top five picks were:

1. Rockets: Hakeem Olajuwon

2. Trail Blazers: Sam Bowie

3. Bulls: Michael Jordan

4. Mavericks: Sam Perkins

5. 76ers: Charles Barkley

I don’t think voters erred by favoring bigger-name players this year. I had the same first-team picks.

My only quibble: I would’ve put Mikal Bridges and Jalen Brunson on the second team over Kevin Huerter and Collin Sexton. Sexton made incredible strides during the season, but focusing on that obscures his awful start in what I think should be a full-season assessment. His box plus-minus (-5.2) is the worst ever for an All-Rookie teamer since Adam Morrison in 2007 (-5.5).

But if Sexton continues on the track he showed within the season, nobody will view him as another bust.

This is an impressive rookie class, led by Doncic. This will be the first of many honors for several of these players.