Duncan Robinson shoots Heat past Pacers in Game 2

Heat guard Duncan Robinson and Pacers center Myles Turner
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Duncan Robinson made 3-pointers on the Heat’s first three possessions.

Not bad for someone who began his college career at at Division III Williams College then went undrafted.

Robinson scored 24 points on 7-of-8 3-point shooting to lead the Heat to a 109-100 win over the Pacers in Game 2 Thursday.

Miami now leads the first-round series, 2-0. Teams up 2-0 in a best-of-seven series have won it 93% of the time. The Heat will look to build on their advantage in Game 3 Saturday.

First, they’ll appreciate Robinson’s big game.

Just 13 players have attempted so many 3-pointers in a playoff game without multiple misses:

  • Jason Terry (2011 DAL-LAL): 9-10
  • Chris Paul (2014 LAC-OKC): 8-9
  • Klay Thompson (2013 GSW-SAS): 8-9
  • Chauncey Billups (2009 DEN-NOH): 8-9
  • Michael Finley (2007 SAS-DEN): 8-9
  • Mookie Blaylock (1997 ATL-CHI): 8-9
  • Duncan Robinson (2020 MIA-IND): 7-8
  • J.R. Smith (2017 CLE-GSW): 7-8
  • Mike Miller (2012 MIA-OKC): 7-8
  • Stephen Jackson (2007 GSW-DAL): 7-8
  • Latrell Sprewell (2004 MIN-DEN): 7-8
  • Bruce Bowen (2003 SAS-LAL): 7-8
  • Kenny Smith (1995 HOU-UTA): 7-8

Both teams defended well. The Heat just have better shot makers.

Even beyond Robinson, Miami shot 11-for-27 on 3-pointers (41%). This is a style that could threaten the Bucks in the second round. Milwaukee has an elite defense but can be susceptible to quality outside shooting.

Of course, the Heat must get past the Pacers first (and Milwaukee past the Magic). But this was a strong step.

Goran Dragic (20 points and six assists) reliably boosted Miami’s offense, even against Indiana’s crisp rotations.

Myles Turner (17 points on 7-of-8 shooting, including 3-for-3 on 3-pointers, with five blocks) was a bright spot on both ends for the Pacers.

But Victor Oladipo (22 points with six turnovers) and Malcolm Brogdon (17 points 4-of-14 shooting, nine assists, no turnovers) played unevenly.

Indiana’s offense just hasn’t been good enough. It’s difficult to see that changing four times in five games.