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Playoff Edition Three Things to Know: Portland’s win was about Enes Kanter not Jennifer

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The NBA playoffs are underway and there can be a lot to unpack in a series of intense games, to help out we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) It was less Jennifer’s motivation and more Enes Kanter that got Portland Game 1 win. With Jusuf Nurkic out, a lot of pundits (myself included) picked Oklahoma City to knock off Portland in the West’s 3/6 first-round playoff matchup. Probably handily.

That’s not what happened in Game 1 Sunday, a 104-99 Trail Blazers win at home. That got Royce Young of ESPN and others talking about the preseason viral Tweet from Portland’s CJ McCollum about a playoff win. It all started when McCollum said wouldn’t do something like join the Warriors to chase rings.

Portland got that win Sunday. On Twitter, Jennifer took credit.

It was less Jennifer and more Enes Kanter — and some dreadful shooting from Paul George and the Thunder — that got Portland the victory at home.

Kanter — the former Thunder big man, about whom coach Billy Donovan was caught on video saying “can’t play Kanter” to an assistant during the playoffs two years ago — had 20 points and 18 rebounds in the Blazers win, filling Nurkic’s shoes well for a night. What Donovan was talking about two years ago was Kanter’s poor pick-and-roll defense, but the Thunder as a team did a poor job trying to exploit that. It allowed Terry Stotts to play Kanter all he wanted, and Kanter was fantastic on offense.

Portland also got 30 points from Damian Lillard — including a tone-setting three to start the game — and 24 from McCollum.

Defensively, Portland followed the book on the Thunder: Pack the paint, cut off drives for Russell Westbrook and Paul George as much as possible, and dare OKC to beat you from the perimeter with jumpers. The Thunder were 10-of-46 (21.7 percent) outside the paint and 5-of-33 from three. Oklahoma City relied on Paul George’s shooting and scoring to provide balance this season, but coming off of — or still bothered by — a sore shoulder, he was 4-of-15 from three and said after the game it was a rhythm thing. We’ll see if he has better rhythm in Game 2.

Westbrook had a triple-double of 24 points, 10 rebounds, and 10 assists, but was 1-of-9 shooting outside three feet of the rim.

Game 1 does not decide a series, this is far from over for the Thunder. However, the Trail Blazers just got a boost of confidence. If Kanter can play this well, not get exposed on defense, and be out on the court for 30ish productive minutes a night, Portland’s chances in this series go way up. The Thunder also just need to hit some jumpers.

2) Houston wins Game 1 with physical defense against Utah. And some James Harden. Going into the 4/5 playoff series in the West, I had three questions about the Utah Jazz: Would they be able to slow James Harden and not let him take over games? Could they keep Chris Paul from carving them up like he did when these teams met in the playoffs a year ago? Could they score enough against Houston to keep up?

The answer to the third question is no, they could not score enough in Game 1, a 122-90 Houston win. It rendered the answers to the other two questions moot.

The Rockets were physical on defense, taking away the cuts and some of the drives the system-offense Jazz are used to getting. The result was a Jazz team that shot 39 percent overall and had an offensive rating of 89.1, well below a point per possession in this one. Donovan Mitchell, the primary (some would say only) elite shot creator on the Jazz saw multiple bodies every time he touched the ball and tried to make a play. Defenders collapsed on Mitchell (and Joe Ingles, Ricky Rubio, or anyone else driving the lane) and bet the Jazz could not find the open shooter and knock down the shot. Houston bet right in Game 1.

Defensively, Utah went to the defensive strategy Milwaukee used effectively on Harden — sit on his left shoulder, force him right, try to take away the step-back three and funnel his drives to the big man waiting in the paint (Rudy Gobert in this case). The problem wasn’t that Harden had 29 points (he needed 26 shots to get there), it was the 10-assists — given a free run to the basket Harden became a playmaker and set up teammates to get the Houston offense clicking.

Utah has some adjustments to make before Game 2, or they are going to head home for Game 3 in a big hole.

3) Giannis Antetokounmpo dunked almost from the free throw line… and that’s pretty much all you need to see from that game. With Blake Griffin sidelined (maybe for the series) with a sore knee, Detroit was completely overwhelmed by Milwaukee in Game 1. It was a 121-86 thrashing. Nothing to see here, just move along…

Well, except this: Giannis Antetokounmpo dunking from almost the free throw line.

The Greek Freak finished with 27 points and 14 rebounds.

Watch LeBron James rack up triple-double, help Lakers pull-away from Nets

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NEW YORK (AP) — LeBron James had 27 points, 12 rebounds and 10 assists in his 10th triple-double of the season and the Los Angeles Lakers made a season-high 19 3-pointers to pull away and beat the Brooklyn Nets 128-113 on Thursday night.

James closed within 17 points of Kobe Bryant for third place on the NBA’s career scoring list with a flurry in the fourth quarter. He can pass Bryant on Saturday at Philadelphia, where the five-time champion with the Lakers was born.

James has 33,626 points. Bryant finished with 33,643.

A back-and-forth game for nearly three quarters turned into a rout after the Lakers broke the Nets’ spirits with four straight 3-pointers spanning the third and fourth quarters, extending a one-point lead to 107-94, and Los Angeles coasted from there.

Anthony Davis had 16 points and 11 rebounds, and Dwight Howard finished with 14 points and 12 boards in his first start of the season.

Kyrie Irving scored 20 points after missing a game with right hamstring tightness, but the Nets lost their fifth straight. Brooklyn has won just two of its last 14 games.

The Nets were without backup centers DeAndre Jordan and Nicolas Claxton, leaving them without many options behind starter Jarrett Allen. But they struggled just as badly guarding the perimeter. Los Angeles was 19 of 38 behind the arc.

The Lakers led 38-35 after one, before both teams made seven 3-pointers in the second. Howard went 4 for 4 for eight points in the period, helping the Lakers take a 75-70 lead to halftime.

Danny Green made three 3s in the first four minutes of the third, pushing the lead to 88-75, but the Nets had it down to 95-94 after a 3-pointer by Irving with 49 seconds remaining. But then Davis and Rajon Rondo hit 3s before Jared Dudley, who played in Brooklyn last season, hit one from near the Nets’ bench to beat the buzzer and make it 104-94.

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope made it four straight 3s to open the fourth, extending the lead back to 13. James then scored eight in the period before taking a seat for good.

 

Check out Jordan Brand/Nike designed All-Star Game uniforms

Image courtesy Jordan Brand
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It’s only fitting that Jordan brand has a significant role with the All-Star Game coming to Chicago.

Jordan Brand designed this year’s ASG uniforms and took its inspiration from the Chicago transit line. Here’s the explanation, straight from the press release (because you don’t want me trying to describe fashion, trust me):

Jordan Brand and Nike designers incorporated the color of each track into the uniforms as a base: blue and red for the NBA All-Star Game; purple and orange for NBA Rising Stars; green and pink for the NBA All-Star Celebrity Game presented by Ruffles; and brown and yellow for the NBA Cares Special Olympics Unified Basketball Game. The Jordan Brand official NBA All-Star game uniforms add the six-pointed star from the Chicago flag as the symbolic refrain while inviting the attitude of the ‘90s-era alternate uniforms worn by the hometown Bulls.

Take a look at them yourself:

The red and blue will be worn by Team LeBron and Team Giannis during the All-Star Game, with other colors for the Rising Star and Celebrity games.

Of course, they are available for sale at NBAStore.com and Nike.com.

Watch Trae Young’s emotional reaction to being named an All-Star Game starter

Trae Young
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Trae Young is an All-Star Game starter at age 21 in just his second NBA season.

While that was not a total surprise — he had led the fan voting in the East among guards since the start — it still was an emotional moment for Young when it was announced (as filmed by his teammate Brandon Goodwin for IG).

Young and Kemba Walker were named the backcourt starters for the Eastern Conference (although both will go into a pool of players picked playground-style by the captains to form teams).

There are two 21-and-under starters in this All-Star Game, Young and Luka Doncic of Dallas. The last time there were two starters under age 21 was 1998 with Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett.

Stephen Curry: I wanted Knicks, not Warriors, to draft me

Stephen Curry
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Stephen Curry‘s agent and father tried to steer him to the Knicks during the 2009 NBA draft.

They weren’t acting autonomously.

Curry on “All The Smoke” podcast:

I wanted to go to New York and thought I was going to New York. I was in the draft in the green room like, oh, get to the eight spot, and New York can get me.

Instead, the Warriors picked Curry No. 7. The Knicks took Jordan Hill at No. 8.

Curry’s sentiment was understandable. Golden State had made the playoffs only once in the previous 15 years. The Knicks hadn’t been much better lately, but at least they offered the glamorous New York market.

It worked out well for Curry, whose agency even made last-ditch efforts to convince the Warriors to pass on him. He blossomed into an all-time great player on a team that gave him an incredible supporting cast. Curry has won three championships in Golden State and says he wants to retire there.

The Knicks, on the other hand, have largely struggled since. They were above average for a few years, but that’s it. Hill washed out after eight unremarkable NBA seasons.

Curry in New York is an interesting “what if?” Would he have overcome that franchise’s deep-seated problems?

Fortunately for him – and contrary to his initial hopes – he never had to find out.