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Three Things to Know: Orlando, Brooklyn reach milestones by making playoffs

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Every day in the NBA there is a lot to unpack, so every weekday morning throughout the season we will give you the three things you need to know from the last 24 hours in the NBA.

1) Orlando, Brooklyn reach milestones in turnarounds by making playoffs. The last time the Brooklyn Nets made the playoffs, Kevin Garnett was on the roster.

The last time the Orlando Magic made the playoffs, Dwight Howard was their leading scorer.

On Sunday, the Nets and Magic punched their tickets to the playoffs again with wins. Those wins deserve some celebration because both franchises had long roads back from decimated positions to get here.

In Orlando, after Dwight Howard forced his way out of town in the summer of 2012 (going on to become a Lakers “legend” then entering a journeyman phase), the Magic franchise was lost in the wilderness with blown draft picks and missed opportunities. A couple of years ago, new management led by Jeff Weltman changed the direction and put Orlando on a playoff path (although we’ll have to see how that Mo Bamba pick works out). Weltman’s best move may have been hiring Steve Clifford, who improved the Orlando defense to top 10 and leaned heavily on Nikola Vucevic — that has proven a winning formula.

Vucevic, remember, came to the Magic in the four-team Dwight Howard trade. Things have come full circle.

Next season, the Magic will add Markelle Fultz to their mix, and if he can bounce back things start to really look up in Orlando. (Vucevic is a free agent this summer, which is the other storyline to watch.)

In Brooklyn, GM Sean Marks inherited a team devastated by the ownership push to win fast when the team moved out of New Jersey, which led then GM Billy King to make some lopsided trades. Marks walked in the door and had not only a decimated roster but also not many draft picks going forward to rebuild with.

Marks searched for undervalued players who could be part of something and found guys such as Spencer Dinwiddie. He traded for young players such as Caris LeVert.

However, two big Marks decisions set this team on a playoff path. The first was hiring coach Kenny Atkinson to establish the culture and develop players — the Nets play hard, move the ball, are unselfish, and it’s all a reflection of Atkinson. The second move was taking on the bad Lakers’ contract of Timofey Mozgov to get D’Angelo Russell. That move was no sure thing, Russell had shown flashes of talent but also a real lack of maturity in Los Angeles, and his inconsistent play continued into his early time in Brooklyn.

However, this year Russell blossomed into an All-Star and leader (just in time for his contract season), and the Nets are going to have to play him because Russell is now a cornerstone of what is being built in Brooklyn.

There’s still work to do in Orlando and Brooklyn to get to the top half of the East and the places both franchises want to go. However, making the playoffs is an important milestone along the way. It should be celebrated.

2) Houston breaks own record, hits 27 threes against Suns to set a new single-game mark. The Rockets are not coasting into the playoffs. Winners of six straight, they still have a shot at the two seed, they are just half a game back of the Nuggets for that spot.

That means the Rockets are still launching threes — and hitting them. Houston broke its own record on Sunday hitting 27 threes in a game.

The Rockets were 27-of-57 (47.4 percent) from beyond the arc. Houston got the win 149-113, with one more win they secure the three seed in the West. They can still get the two seed, but the Rockets will need a little help from the Nuggets to get there.

3) Warriors play last regular-season game in Oracle Arena in Oakland. No doubt the new Chase Center in San Francisco, which the Warriors will call home starting next season, will be a beautiful, gleaming new building with all the bells and whistles of a modern arena.

But it won’t be “Roar-acle.”

Sunday, the Warriors bid farewell to one of the loudest, most raucous arenas in the NBA, Oracle Arena. They did it with class, wearing the throwback jerseys of the 2007 “We Beleive” Warriors, and raising a banner celebrating the 47 years in Oakland that will hang in the Chase Center.

The Warriors also got the win and locked up the No. 1 seed in the West on Sunday.

Which means there are more memories to be made in Oracle, the Warriors should be making another deep playoff run, all the way to the Finals. The journey of that building is not yet done. But take a look back at the memories.

Mavericks owner Mark Cuban fined $50,000; Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta $25,000

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The first rule of NBA ownership: Don’t talk about NBA ownership.

Or the business you do as an owner until it becomes official, even if by then everyone else has known for days and already moved on from the topic.

Monday was an expensive day for two of the NBA’s owners of teams in Texas. Mark Cuban was fined $50,000 for leaking information from the league’s Board of Governor’s meeting about the new coach’s challenge  — even though everybody knew what was going to happen — before the meeting officially ended. Tim MacMahon of ESPN reported this story and had maybe the best quote of the summer to go with it.

The NBA office fined Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban $50,000 after he admitted to leaking information from last week’s Board of Governors meeting to a reporter, sources told ESPN…

“I appreciate the irony of your reporting on a fine that someone should, but won’t, get fined for leaking to you,” Cuban told ESPN.

Sources said Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadive expressed concern that information about the vote to allow coaches’ challenges was being reported while the meeting was still in session. Cuban immediately admitted that he had leaked the information, sources said.

Well played, Cuban.

This is a letter of the law fine, but was it a big deal that this got out? The vote was all but assured, a formality, but Cuban gets fined for telling people? Thanks, Vivek.

From the same “is this really a big deal” file we have the fine Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta got on Monday, $25,000 for talking about the Russell Westbrook trade before it was official. Even though everybody was talking about it. From Mark Stein of the New York Times.

Here is the oh-so-damaging quote:

Again, I get Fertitta crossed the official line because the trade had not gone through yet, but does that line really need to exist in these cases? It feels like the silly hat thing at the NBA Draft.

Damaging or even interesting information was not divulged in either case. The fines were not steep because of it, but the NBA’s process of what is and is not allowed around trades and free agency — and the odd Board of Governors meeting — seems behind the times.

 

Report: Clippers, Rockets both still interested in Andre Iguodala, but both at stalemate

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The Memphis Grizzlies don’t want to just waive veteran Andre Iguodala, they want to get something back in return. That is just turning out to be challenging.

The Clippers and Rockets are still interested, but both teams are at a stalemate, something Shams Charania of The Athletic broke down in a new video.

The story in a nutshell:

• The Rockets are interested, but Iguodala’s $17.2 million would take the team deep into the luxury tax (Houston is currently just shy of the tax line). Charania says any deal likely would involve a sign-and-trade, which implies Iman Shumpert, probably with a draft pick attached.

• The only Clippers’ salary that lines up cleanly is Mo Harkless (with some other players), but Los Angeles doesn’t want to give him up.

Memphis can afford to be patient and say they will just bring Iguodala into training camp, that they are willing to start the season with him.

This may take some time to get done and could ultimately involve a third team. Maybe Dallas gets back in the conversation, or other teams look at their roster and decide they want the veteran wing. This also could be something that drags into training camp, there are no easy answers lined up or the deal would be done already.

Warriors GM on D’Angelo Russell: “We didn’t sign him with the intention of just trading him”

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From the moment the Warriors acquired D'Angelo Russell in a sign-and-trade deal that cleared the path for Kevin Durant to go to Brooklyn, speculation about fit and an eventual trade cropped up. Does Russell’s game really fit with Stephen Curry and, eventually, Klay Thompson‘s, in a three-guard lineup? If not, how fast will they trade him? February at the trade deadline? Next summer?

From the start the Warriors have shot down the idea that they just planned to trade Russell, and on Monday Warriors GM Bob Myers repeated the same thing.

The Warriors plan has been to play Russell and Curry next to each other — they got an All-Star guard to soak up the minutes until Thompson can return (likely sometime after the All-Star break, if at all next season). Maybe the fit works, maybe it doesn’t, but the Warriors aren’t putting limitations or preconceived notions on the possibilities.

If it doesn’t work out, the trade option will still be there.

The Warriors do not head into this season the same juggernaut to be feared, but sleep on them at your own risk. As Meyers said, they believe they have a team that can compete with anyone.

 

Report: Raptors don’t intend to trade Kyle Lowry, Marc Gasol or Serge Ibaka

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Just a few weeks after winning a championship, the Raptors look finished as championship contenders.

In an unprecedented exit, superstar Kawhi Leonard left. Danny Greenan underrated contributor – followed him from Toronto.

The Raptors can remain good with Pascal Siakam, Kyle Lowry, Marc Gasol and Serge Ibaka. But with Lowry ($34,996,296), Gasol ($25,595,700) and Ibaka ($23,271,604) older players on expiring contracts, this iteration of the team will likely be short-lived. Toronto’s obvious path is rebuilding around Siakam.

Will the Raptors get a head start on that by dealing those veterans for assets that can help more down the road?

Josh Lewenberg of TSN:

As for veterans Kyle Lowry, Marc Gasol and Serge Ibaka – who are all on expiring deals – the Raptors have no intention of moving them, at least not before the season, according to sources.

This is perfectly fine.

The Raptors might be less-equipped in a few years by not getting value for those veterans now.

But Toronto deserves a victory lap. There’s value in Raptors fans enjoying these championship players – especially Lowry. This team should still make the playoffs, and even moderate winning will make this prolonged title celebration more satisfying.