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Report: Lakers expected to fire Luke Walton after season

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Even when saying Luke Walton would finish the season as Lakers coach, Lakers president Magic Johnson added, “unless something drastic happens, which it won’t.”

Some vote of confidence.

The new information since: Johnson is unhappy with Walton’s offense, defense and assistant coaches. LeBron James‘ camp wants Walton fired. Veterans have squabbled with Walton. The Lakers have stumbled to a 30-33 record – 4.5 games and two teams out of playoff position.

Though the Lakers keep maintaining they’ll keep Walton through the rest of the season, there’s little confidence beyond.

Marc Stein of The New York Times:

The prevailing assumption in league coaching circles remains that Walton will almost certainly be dismissed after the season

Maybe people in league coaching circles see what we all see: A team that has failed to meet expectations, a coach working for a president who didn’t hire him, tepid endorsements from that president. Assuming the Lakers will fire Walton after the season is not a radical stance.

But people in coaching circles also sometimes have more information. That possibility adds heft to this report. Are the Lakers setting up a coaching search or even already lining up a replacement? That can be hard to keep quiet.

The Lakers will already have a hard enough time making the playoffs this year. Increased doubt about Walton’s future in Los Angeles will probably make that task even tougher.

Report: ‘Significant amount of pessimism’ NBA will restart season

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The idea of creating a “bubble” in Las Vegas to restart the NBA season sounds enticing. They have the hotel rooms in the city and the facilities at the UNLV campus (where Summer League takes place), it may need to be a condensed playoffs, but it’s something. It provides hope.

That hope is fading, however. They have tried to use the bubble idea to restart the Chinese Basketball Association — and twice China has had to push back the start of the league as the coronavirus has refused to fade away.

China’s experience has added to a growing pessimism that the NBA can pull off any part of this season, ESPN’S Brian Windhorst said on SportsCenter:

“I think there was optimism about progress a week ago. Some things that have happened this week have turned it south about what could happened…

“The Chinese are finding that asymptomatic carriers are causing maybe a second wave in that country and they’re just slamming the breaks on sports…

“It is clear that the NBA is angling to set up a deal that enables them to shut the season down. They don’t have to do that yet. The way they’re negotiating, they’re leaving an option either way. But they’re not having talks about how to restart the league. They’re having financial talks about what would happen if the season shuts down. I think there’s a significant amount of pessimism.”

That pessimism only grows when you consider the potential impact on the United States from COVID-19, with the White House’s own projections having 100,000 dead on the low end. Add to that the significant economic costs that our nation is just starting to experience and, while a return to basketball and its distraction sounds enticing, it’s also hard to picture.

For example, the idea of putting a “bubble” in Las Vegas (or Orlando or the Bahamas or wherever) is a promising theory on a surface level but becomes a logistical nightmare when trying to make it work in practice.

Are you going to get all the players, coaches, trainers, equipment managers, camera operators (these games will be broadcast), and the rest to self-quarantine for two weeks before they come to the bubble in Vegas? Or, will there be the many hundreds of tests (maybe a 1,000?) needed to screen everyone? What is the rate of false negatives with this test? Can players bring families (they would have to be tested and live in the bubble) or will everyone separate from their family for 6-8 weeks? The league will need about a three-week training camp in the bubble before you can start games, then there would be weeks of games, and all that time the bubble has to be secure. Is that realistic? Do the hotel staff and cooks feeding everyone in the bubble have to stay in the bubble?

That’s not even all of the challenges and it’s daunting. And that is for the “faster” answer of playing all the games in one location and without fans. Who knows how long it will be before teams can fly around the country to play in packed arenas again.

The NBA does not have to make a decision now or even soon, it can wait into May and June and see where things stand with the virus, the economy, and the nation. Still, it’s harder and harder to be an optimist with all of this.

Sacramento Kings turning former arena into coronavirus surge hospital

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If you’re old enough, you might remember Arco Arena as the home of the Sacramento Kings when they were a playoff team. Chris Webber, Mike Bibby, Peja Stojaković, and company pushed the Shaq/Kobe Lakers to seven games in 2002 and won huge playoff games in the arena. Arco was where Jason Williams was dropping dimes without looking, and arena which later became known as the Sleep Train Arena, Power Balance Pavilion, and eventually the current Natomas Arena.

Now, it’s about to be a coronavirus surge hospital.

The Kings are making the arena available and it will house about 360 beds, the team announced on Friday. The team also is donating $250,000 to support area community organizations providing services to families in need in the area, plus donating 100,000 medical masks to state and local health agencies.

“On behalf of the entire Kings family, our hearts are with all who have been affected by this pandemic,” said Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadivé in a statement. “California always leads the nation and the world, and we applaud Governor [Gavin] Newsom’s strong and decisive leadership to keep Californians healthy and safe during this crisis…

“Our community has always come first, and that is more important now than ever,” Ranadivé continued. “The Kings are proud to help by providing additional space to accommodate a predicted surge in patients. We are also donating masks to help keep people healthy, and critical resources to area organizations that are addressing food insecurity and other issues as a result of the coronavirus. I have always been in awe of the resilience and ingenuity of the American people and firmly believe that together, we will defeat this invisible enemy.”

The Kings moved to the Golden 1 Center in downtown Sacramento in 2015 and since then their former home and practice arena has mostly sat vacant. The Kings’ G-League team practices there at times, but like the rest of basketball they find their season suspended.

Hopefully, this arena helps save some lives in the California capital. That would be the most important thing ever to happen in the building.

WNBA postpones season

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Mavericks owner Mark Cuban backed off his belief that the NBA could resume in May.

It’s just already clear, amid the coronavirus pandemic, it’ll be unsafe to hold professional basketball games that soon.

WNBA release:

WNBA Commissioner Cathy Engelbert released the following statement:

“As developments continue to emerge around the COVID-19 pandemic, including the extension of the social distancing guidelines in the United States through April 30, the WNBA will postpone the start of its training camps and tip of the regular season originally scheduled for May 15.  While the league continues to use this time to conduct scenario-planning regarding new start dates and innovative formats, our guiding principle will continue to be the health and safety of the players, fans and employees.

Many top female players – including Los Angeles Sparks guard Sydney Wiese, who tested positive for coronavirus – play overseas during the WNBA offseason. That frequency of travel makes it even riskier for WNBA teams to gather any time soon.

The WNBA will still hold its draft April 17, conducting proceedings virtually. That could provide lessons to the NBA as it determines how to handle its draft.

Joel Embiid, 76ers owners pledging $1.3M for fighting coronavirus

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Joel Embiid just showed up 76ers owners Josh Harris and David Blitzer by pledging to pay team employees who were set to have their pay cut. Amid widespread backlash, the 76ers backtracked on their salary-reduction plan.

Now – with a portion of Embiid’s coronavirus-related donation unallocated and Harris and Blitzer looking to change the narrative around them – those three are working together.

Noah Levick of NBC Sports Philadelphia:

Joel Embiid, Sixers managing partner Josh Harris and co-managing partner David Blitzer are contributing a combined $1.3 million to Penn Medicine, establishing a funding campaign for COVID-19 antibody testing of frontline healthcare workers.

According to a Penn Medicine press release, “The pledge from Embiid, Harris and Blitzer will provide a much-needed boost for efforts to quickly identify health care workers who may have immunity to the new virus.”

This is great.