Kyrie Irving on confidence level with Celtics: ‘Next question’ (VIDEO)

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Kyrie Irving doesn’t seem very happy with the Boston Celtics. The team is a disappointment, and currently stands fifth in the Eastern Conference amid a four-game losing streak.

Irving has had several headline-grabbing quotes over the course of the season, the most recent coming in response to what Marcus Smart told reporters after a loss to the Toronto Raptors.

Boston lost to the Portland Trail Blazers on Wednesday night, and Irving again showed how testy he can be with the media. A reporter asked Irving what his confidence level was with the team, and Irving responded by acting as though the question was unfair.

Via Twitter:

Reporter: “What’s your confidence level in the team going forward?”

Irving: “What do you mean? What kind of question is that?”

Reporter: “A legitimate one.”

Irving “Nah. Next question.”

This of course is a completely normal question. It holds no discernible difference from the other types of basic, open-ended, quote-producing questions reporters ask of Irving on any given night.

In fact, the majority of regular season post-game questions are perfunctory in any case — often met with similarly bland answers — where the resulting platitudes are only of interest based on how well-practiced the athlete is in reciting them.

Who knows how or why Irving interpreted this innocuous inquiry the way he did? It’s clear that Irving didn’t like this question. It could be contextual within his relationship with the reporter, it could be that he’s simply sick of losing, or it could be that the true answer isn’t something he wants to give. But the question, at its core, is perfectly fair (if not a little boring).

If you wanted to wade into the pool of conjecture, Irving could have potentially seen the question as an invitation to profess his confidence that the team would get back on track as a show of leadership. Perhaps it was his chance to finally take the reigns of this whole “I want my own team” thing? Players have done more with less.

I’m not going to go too far into this without a life jacket, but the idea that Irving is “weird” or “quirky” or “off-beat” is simply wearing thin. It feels as though Irving’s commentary, particularly since his Flat Earth remarks, are built on creating a media frenzy around him to raise his Q rating. If it’s a marketing strategy, it’s a transparent one and one that isn’t endearing, especially when the end result is a 103-minute Pepsi commercial.

Nobody can blame Irving for being bummed about what’s happening in Boston, but acting as though “What’s your confidence level?” is some unfair question is an opinion projected in such bad faith I can’t take it or Irving seriously.

Plus, we all know the answer: it’s low.