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Watch Magic’s Evan Fournier hit buzzer beater vs. Pistons (VIDEO)

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ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) Even when he’s not having a big game, Evan Fournier is still the Orlando Magic’s best option at the end of games.

Fournier took an inbounds pass outside the 3-point arc, dribbled to the free throw line and shot a floating jumper that dropped through the nets as the buzzer sounded on Orlando’s 109-107 win over the Detroit Pistons on Sunday.

“Evan wants the ball at the end, he has courage,” Magic coach Steve Clifford said. “That was not an easy shot, but if he can get a shot like that, you’re comfortable he’s going to make it.”

D.J. Augustin had 26 points and eight assists, and Nikola Vucevic and Aaron Gordon each scored 22 points to help the Magic win their second straight. Fournier finished with 13.

With the clock winding down, Fournier was the easy call for the potential winning shot attempt. He had a 3-pointer to beat Cleveland at the buzzer earlier this season.

“I really embrace those moments,” Fournier said. “It’s everyone’s dream to have one buzzer beater in the NBA so having two is even better.”

Fournier’s winning basket ended a wild finish in which Detroit wiped out an eight-point deficit in the final three minutes only to lose for the 11th time in their last 14 games.

Luke Kennard scored 16 points to lead the Pistons. Reggie Bullock and Blake Griffin had 15 apiece and Andre Drummond had 14 points and 15 rebounds.

Detroit thought it had pushed the game into overtime when Bullock was fouled on a 3-point attempt with 2.5 seconds to go and made all three free throws to tie the score at 107.

However, the Pistons couldn’t come up with a stop when they needed one.

“Games don’t come down to just one play,” Detroit coach Dwane Casey said. “There were way too many possessions before that when we did things that get you beat. We just have to learn to do the simple things.”

Neither team led by more than six points in the second half until Augustin sparked an 8-0 run with back-to-back 3-pointers and fed Jonathan Isaac for a fastbreak layup that gave Orlando a 95-87 lead with 7:07 left in the game.

Later in the quarter, Augustin stole a rebound from Drummond, drove the lane and whipped a wraparound pass to Vucevic for an uncontested layup that made it 104-95 with 3 1/2 minutes to go.

Detroit rallied quickly. A layup by Reggie Jackson cut the deficit to 105-104 with 8.9 seconds remaining.

Orlando’s Terrence Ross got loose for a breakaway dunk with 5.4 seconds to go but Bullock’s free throws tied it.

Fournier took the inbounds pass and immediately drove into the lane, lofting his shot just before the buzzer sound to give Orlando the win.

TIP-INS

Pistons: Detroit came into the game off a season-worst 37-point loss to Indiana. … Detroit is No. 1 in offensive rebounding advantage over opponents with a plus-110 margin coming in. The Pistons added to that, grabbing 17 rebounds to 10 for the Magic. … Griffin took a nasty fall when he slipped on a wet floor while trying to inbound the ball after a turnover. Griffin lay on the floor for 15 seconds before getting up and continuing play.

Magic: PG D.J. Augustin badly sprained his ankle after stepping on Griffin’s foot with 1:44 left in the game, but stayed in the game. … Orlando came in off as season-best 29-point win over Toronto. … F Jonathon Simmons left the game in the second quarter with an ankle injury and did not return. … The Magic outscored the Pistons 22-8 in points in the paint in the first quarter.

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING?

Casey was upset enough with Detroit’s performance in a 125-88 loss at Indiana on Friday to apologize to fans for “one of the worst exhibitions we’ve put on the floor.”

Two days later, he downplayed the impact of the 20-minute team meeting he had with players after the game.

“Nothing came out of the meeting that hasn’t been said before,” Casey said before Sunday’s game. “When you walk across the black lines, if you have your hard hat on and your boots tied, that is what this game is about. We haven’t exemplified that enough consistently and until we do, we’re going to be on a roller coaster.”

UP NEXT

Pistons: Continue a four-game road trip Tuesday night at Milwaukee.

Magic: Start a six-game road trip in Charlotte on Monday night.

More AP NBA: http://www.apnews.com/NBA and http://www.twitter.com/AP-Sports

James Harden broke on of his youth camper’s ankles (VIDEO)

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It’s around the time of summer when NBA players (and coaches, and college coaches, and a whole lot of other people) are holding youth basketball camps.

I went to them as a kid (John Wooden’s was the best) and like me, these youth will have the memories of a lifetime, even if they move away from playing hoops someday. Especially this boy, who will forever be able to look back at this video from camp of James Harden breaking his ankles. (Via Houston Rockets Instagram)

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Meanwhile at @jharden13’s camp…😅

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Meanwhile, over at Dwyane Wade‘s camp, he was reminding some young children he is the best shot blocking guard of all time.

 

Could Anthony Davis someday play for hometown Bulls? “I’d definitely consider it”

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Not every player wants to go home.

LeBron James returned to Cleveland (for a while). Kawhi Leonard and Paul George pushed to get back to Southern California. However, plenty of players see the return to their home town as more curse than blessing — it takes a maturity to be the face of the city, to not let hanging with your old buddies get in the way of off-season workouts, to handle everyone you went to high school with asking you for tickets to the game. A player has to be ready for a lot to go home.

Would Anthony Davis consider a return to Chicago to lead the Bulls?

He wouldn’t rule it out. Someday. Here’s what Davis said to K.C. Johnson of the Chicago Tribune.

“I mean, (this is) definitely hometown,” he said. “If the opportunity ever presents itself and when that time comes, I’d definitely consider it.”

That does not mean next summer. Technically Davis is a free agent next summer, however, he is all but certain to re-sign with the Lakers (it’s possible things go Dwight Howard/Steve Nash bad in Los Angeles and Davis wants out, but it’s highly unlikely). Davis pushed his way to Los Angeles to win and lead the biggest brand in basketball down the line, to have his name in the rafters with legendary big men (Wilt, Kareem, Shaq). He’s not bolting that after one season.

Could he finish his career in Chicago? Maybe. I’d say the same thing about Stephen Curry with Charlotte, but we are too many years from that to make any kind of prediction.

However, Davis didn’t slam the door shut. Maybe someday that will be good news for Bulls fans.

Newly minted Wizards GM Tommy Sheppard quickly faces Bradley Beal questions

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While ownership danced with Tim Connley in Denver and Masai Ujiri in Toronto, Tommy Sheppard spent the past few months trying to clean up a mess of a Washington Wizards roster and, more importantly, their messed up salary cap situation.

There was only so much Sheppard could do considering John Wall‘s supermax extension kicks in next season (and runs four seasons) and the team will pay Ian Mahinmi $15.5 million. However, Sheppard got Washington below the tax number by trading Dwight Howard and letting three players — Tomas Satoransky, Bobby Portis, and Jabari Parker — just walk. He then tried to add inexpensive and interesting talent to the roster, such as Rui Hachimura, Davis Bertans, and Moritz Wagner. It was all those moves that ultimately got the “interim” tag taken off his GM job title, reports Chase Hughes at NBC Sports Washington.

How Sheppard navigated the Wizards through the draft and free agency was central in why managing partner Ted Leonsis decided to elevate him to the long-term post. The last several weeks were treated as a “trial run,” according to a person familiar with the process.

However, the biggest test comes next Friday, and how Sheppard and Wizards ownership handle it will define the course of the franchise for years.

On July 26 (Friday), the Wizards can — and by all indications will — offer Bradley Beal a three-year, $111 million contract extension.

Beal likely turns it down.

That’s the growing sense around the league. While part of his motivation may be questions about the future direction in Washington, there are also cold financial reasons to say no — Beal makes more money if he waits. Maybe even to the point of becoming a free agent in 2021. Our own Dan Feldman broke it down this way (future estimates based on salary cap projections by the NBA):

• Sign this 2019 extension: $111.8 over three years ($35.1 million per year)
• Make All-NBA next season and sign a super-max extension in 2020: $250 million over five years ($50 million per year)
• Become a free agent and re-sign with Wizards on regular-max in 2021: $214 million over five years ($43 million per year)
• Become a free agent and re-sign with Wizards on super-max in 2021: $250 million over five years ($50 million per year)
• Leave Wizards in 2021: $159 million over four years ($40 million per year)

Beal can afford to bet on himself and wait, he just turned 26 and has not had the kind of injury issues that would make him think he needs to take the security now (he has played 82 games each of the last two seasons).

How do Sheppard — and Wizards’ management — react when Beal says no is the question. That is the real test Sheppard faces.

Part of that reaction will be based on what Beal and his representatives say: Do they turn down the offer and say Beal wants to be traded?

Or, do they turn down the offer and say, “Beal wants to stay but will wait because he wants a super-max contract?” (Beal finished seventh in All-NBA guard voting, with the top six making the All-NBA, he is right on the cusp.) This may be the most likely option, Beal cannot get the super-max contract if traded.

If/when Beal turns the Wizards down, Sheppard’s phone will start ringing again with teams testing the trade market waters for Beal. There is tremendous interest in him from across the league.

How Sheppard handles those calls will start to set the tone for what is next in Washington. What the Wizards do with Beal — and John Wall, out for the season with a torn Achilles and already on his super-max — will define Wizards’ basketball for years to come.

Kosta Koufos heading to Europe, agrees to terms with CSKA Moscow

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After spending 11 seasons in the NBA, the last four years in Sacramento, Kosta Koufos has found a new home for next season.

In Moscow. With EuroLeague powerhouse CSKA Moscow.

Koufos struggled to fit in his big-man game with the new up-tempo Kings last season. Add to that the NBA moving toward “small ball” — which is more about skill and mobility than size — Koufos has decided to head overseason. He’s making more than the NBA veteran minimum, which is likely what he would have gotten from an NBA squad.

All but the elite big men in the NBA are finding reduced demand and with that reduced pay scale, so good on Koufos for doing what is best for himself.