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2018 NBA Draft pick-by-pick tracker with analysis of selections, trades

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It’s been a long time since there was so much uncertainty at the top of an NBA Draft. While the top pick was pretty much a lock with the Suns taking DeAndre Ayton, things were wide open after that with plenty of talk about trades up and down — and teams looking to move into the lottery.

We were on top of all of the big news on draft night.

Here is a breakdown of every pick, every trade — complete with analysis of how that player fits (or doesn’t) with his new surroundings.

Suns small icon 1. The Phoenix Suns: Deandre Ayton, 7’0” center (Arizona). Physically, he has the potential to be one of the game’s dominant centers — he’s big and long (7’5” wingspan), he moves incredibly well, he can knock down threes, and he can run the court. Offensively he’s going to put up numbers and be an impact player from Day 1. If he puts in the work when challenged on his defense he could be a force on both ends. He could be the franchise cornerstone the Suns need, the inside to Devin Booker‘s outside.

Kings small icon 2. Sacramento Kings: Marvin Bagley III, 6’11” forward/center (Duke). One of the best athletes in the draft and a natural scorer, he’s going to be able to get buckets in the NBA. He’s got a great bounce (an amazing second jump), attacks the glass, can finish at the rim and shot 40 percent from three for the Blue Devils. The question is can he defend — he showed poor defensive instincts and Mike Krzyzewski had to play zone at Duke last season because Bagley (and Wendell Carter) could not handle pick-and-roll coverages. He’s got to get better on that end to reach his NBA potential.

WE HAVE A TRADE: As had been rumored for a while, the Dallas Mavericks are trading with the Atlanta Hawks — the Mavericks have wanted Luka Doncic and the Hawks will take him at No. 3, then the Mavericks will take Trae Young at No. 5. (The Hawks will also receive a future first-round pick).

Hawks small icon 3. Atlanta Hawks: Luka Doncic, 6’8” point/forward (Slovenia). He will not play for the Hawks, he will be traded to the Dallas Mavericks (selecting No. 5). Doncic is the most decorated European player ever to enter the NBA Draft (EuroLeague champion and MVP, ACB champion and MVP), he is a phenom off the pick-and-roll and a great playmaker in transition. He has shooting range from the NBA three and he can finish inside. He’s been putting up numbers against men in Europe and should adapt to the NBA fairly quickly. The doubts are he’s not an elite athlete, not explosive by NBA standards. Can he defend well enough at this level, and how will he handle being guarded by those kinds of athletes?

Grizzlies small icon 4. Memphis Grizzlies: Jaren Jackson Jr., 6’11” forward/center (Michigan St.). Has the look and game of the prototypical modern NBA center — he’s got a great wingspan (7’5”) and uses that to protect the rim and block shots. He’s a good shooter out to the arc, can finish inside with either hand. He’s got to learn to play consistently harder and be better on the glass — it’s not all highlight plays, but he’s one of the youngest players in the draft and will grow. Needs to improve his passing as well. Son of 13-year NBA vet Jaren Jackson.

Mavericks small icon 5. Dallas Mavericks: Trae Young, 6’2” point guard (Oklahoma). He will not be Maverick, he will be traded to the Atlanta Hawks (for Luka Doncic and a future first-round pick). Young is a fan favorite for many because he has Stephen Curry-like range on his three out to 30 feet, plus he’s a gifted passer who sees the floor incredibly well. Scouts mostly like him, but there is some concern he’s got more Jimmer Fredette in him than Curry. Young has to learn to manage the game, not be so turnover prone. The bigger issues are defensively, he’s not big and not an elite NBA athlete like many guys he’ll be asked to guard — and his defense was poor at Oklahoma. Can he stay playable in an NBA of switching defenses?

Magic small icon 6: Orlando Magic: Mohamed Bamba 7’0” center (Texas). Maybe the highest ceiling in this draft. He has a crazy wingspan of 7’9.5” and he can be a Pterodactyl on defense that flies in and blocks or alters everything. He’s athletic and mobile enough to hold his own on switches on the perimeter. A lot of Rudy Gobert comparisons, but like Gobert he has to work hard adding muscle and getting stronger without losing quickness to reach that potential. Does Bamba have the love of the game to put in that work? He played casually at times in college. Offensively, he’s raw and has a long, long way to go. This is a high ceiling, but low floor pick.

Bulls small icon 7: Chicago Bulls: Wendell Carter Jr., 6’10” center (Duke). He’s a throwback, physical force inside around the rim, but more well rounded than that on offense. He can back guys down in the post, has an outside shot, is a fantastic passer, and shows impressive footwork for someone so young. Very versatile on offense (think Al Horford). On defense, however, he’s slow-footed, doesn’t move great laterally, and could find himself exposed against pick-and-rolls. Can he stay on the court late in games in a switching, speedy NBA?

Cavaliers small icon 8: Cleveland Cavaliers: Collin Sexton, 6’2” point guard (Alabama). You remember him as the guy who dropped 40 when Alabama had to play 3-on-5 early in the college season, Sexton has the potential to be a very good at the one in the NBA. He’s long (6’7” wingspan), athletic, and with a great work ethic. He attacks the lane and knows how to draw fouls. He’s got to become more consistent as a shooter and a decision maker to thrive in the NBA, but he has the potential. Could play with LeBron James or be a building block if he bolts (although shoot-first Sexton and never-pass Jordan Clarkson might literally fight over the ball).

Knicks small icon 9. New York Knicks: Kevin Knox, 6’9” forward (Kentucky ). A guy who shot up draft boards with his showings at the NBA Draft Combine and private workouts. He can be an athletic three or a small ball four — if he can solidify his inconsistent jump shot (he shot 34 percent from three in college, he will find more space to shoot in the NBA). He struggled to defend quicker players in college (there are more of them in the NBA) and there are concerns about his toughness. A lot of potential here to be a quality NBA player at a position of need.

Sixers small icon 10. Philadelphia 76ers: Mikal Bridges, 6’7” forward (Villanova). He has been traded to the Phoenix Suns. Bridges is a solid role player on the wing who can guard multiple positions (the 7’2” wingspan helps) and knock down threes (43.5 percent last season). He’s also performed well on the big stages of the NCAA tournament, he can handle pressure. He has to prove he’s an elite defender on ball, but this guy is a solid NBA player and will be in the league for years.

Hornets small icon 11. Charlotte Hornets: Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, 6’6” guard (Kentucky). He will be traded to the Los Angeles Clippers (scroll down a little for the details). A fast-rising point guard on draft boards this season, Gilgeous-Alexander is a big point guard (7’0” wingspan) and is not explosive but finds open spaces in the defense. He needs to become an improved shooter, especially from three, and his handles and game management need to take steps forward. Still a lot of potential as a rotation point guard and he showed that growth potential in Kentucky becoming the leader of that team.

WE HAVE A TRADE: The Hornets are going to trade Shai Gilgeous-Alexander to the Clippers for the No. 12 pick plus two future second-round picks. The Clippers have wanted a point guard who could be a core part of their future (with all due respect to Austin Rivers).

Clippers small icon 12. Los Angeles Clippers: Miles Bridges, 6’6” forward (Michigan St.). He will be traded to the Charlotte Hornets as part of the deal mentioned directly above. Bridges’ return to college to lift his draft stock didn’t really work that way, but he still looks like a quality NBA wing rotation player. He can hit threes (36.4 percent shooting them last season), he’s strong on the glass, and he’s an athlete who knows how to attack the rim. He can guard threes and fours and will be able switch and fit in the modern NBA.

Clippers small icon 13. Los Angeles Clippers: Jerome Robinson, 6’5” point guard (Boston College). He played point in college — and was very productive there — but likely will be more of a combo guard in the NBA. He brings a high IQ game, three point shooting and he can shoot off the bounce. Is he athletic enough and with that can he defend well enough to be a regular rotation guy for the Clippers? Teams thought so as he shot up draft boards at the end.

Nuggets small icon 14. Denver Nuggets: Michael Porter Jr., 6’10” forward (Missouri). He slid a long, long way down the board but this is a good gamble for the Nuggets at 14. Before the injury he was thought of as a top-three pick, play like that and this is a steal. There are concerns about his back injury (a microdiscetomy that forced him to miss much of last season) and a rumored “diva” attitude (already). The physical tools and potential is what had teams drooling — he’s big and can score inside and out. He has the potential to be a very dangerous stretch four because he’s a fantastic shooter and a high-level athlete. Will he put in the work to reach his potential?

Wizards small icon 15. Washington Wizards: Troy Brown, 6-7, wing (Oregon). Another draft board climber in recent weeks. He has great length (6’11” wingspan) and was one of the top recruits in his class. He brings the kind of versatility on the wing that NBA teams crave. However, there are questions about how good of an athlete he is and his shooting needs work to be consistent. That said, he’s one of the younger guys in the draft and should develop over time.

Suns small icon 16. The Phoenix Suns: Zhaire Smith, 6’5” small forward (Texas Tech). He has been traded to the Philadelphia 76ers for Mikal Bridges and Miami’s 2021 first-round pick. This is a pick about potential — on paper he’s what teams are looking for in a modern NBA swingman. Smith fits with the Sixers’ style, he’s of the best athletes in the draft, has a 6’11” wingpan, and showed good defensive instincts. He’s got a lot of work to do on offense, his handles need work, his instincts aren’t sharp, and scouts don’t trust his shot. High upside, but it’s going to take some development.

WE HAVE A TRADE: The Sixers are not keeping the hometown kid — Mikal Bridges of Villanova is being traded to Phoenix (where he will pair with Josh Jackson on the wing) for Zhaire Smith and Miami’s 2021 first-round pick. Smith fits right in with the Sixers drafting pattern — long, athletic, and a real project.

Bucks small icon 17. Milwaukee Bucks: Donte DiVincenzo, 6’5” point guard (Villanova). You may remember him as the hero of the NCAA Championship game (31 points for the Wildcats), but after that he turned heads at the NBA Combine by testing better athletically than expected. He can play either guard position, can space the floor as a shooter (but needs to be more consistent), is a good passer, and plays hard at both ends. Coaches will like him and his effort, and he should be a solid rotation guard player.

Spurs small icon 18. San Antonio Spurs: Lonnie Walker IV, 6-‘4” shooting guard, (Miami). Good gamble this far down in the draft by the Spurs, some teams thought he was a lottery pick. Walker is all about the upside — a tremendous athlete who has a 6’10” wingspan and has shown he can be a playmaker. He’s got a lot of work to put in to live up to that potential at the NBA level — his handle needs to get better, his shot needs to get better, he needs to show a real commitment on the defensive end. Was he just misused in Miami? No better spot to develop than on the Spurs.

Hawks small icon 19. Atlanta Hawks: Kevin Huerter, 6’7” shooting guard (Maryland). He turned some heads with a strong showing at the NBA Combine and climbed draft boards after that. Could develop into a catch-and-shoot specialist with some positional versatility that teams crave. He’s not an elite athlete or ball handler, his ability to defend at the NBA level is in question, but he showed an ability to shoot the rock, is a good passer, and he plays smart. He had surgery on ligaments in his right wrist before the draft and he will be out through Summer League but should be ready for training camp.

20. Minnesota Timberwolves: Josh Okogie, 6’4” shooting guard (Georgia Tech). He had a strong NBA Combine and impressed in team workouts, which helped him climb the board. He’s a good defender with a long wingspan (7’0”) and the potential to be a multi-positional defender — which is how you get drafted by Tom Thibodeau. He’s athletic, can shoot the ball off the dribble or on the move (and man, does Minnesota need shooting, but Okogie needs to be more consistent). He looks like he could become a useful rotation player in the modern NBA.

Jazz small icon 21. Utah Jazz: Grayson Allen, 6’4” shooting guard (Duke). A very good shooter (if a bit streaky, he had a major slump in the middle of last season) he is athletic enough to create space off the ball then turn and hit the open look. As a four-year senior, he comes in more ready to contribute now than most in this draft. There are questions about his defense and his decision making as a passer, but if he can shoot the rock in the NBA like he did as a Blue Devil he will fit in perfectly (and from Day 1) with the floor-spacing Utah Jazz.

Bulls small icon 22: Chicago Bulls: Chandler Hutchison, 6’7” wing (Boise St.). He fits in the modern NBA — the guy is a smooth athlete who just knows how to get buckets, and he shoots well on the move. He needs to improve that shooting and add some range to really impact the NBA, but he should be a good fit as a rotation player.

Pacers small icon 23. Indiana Pacers: Aaron Holiday, 6’1” point guard (UCLA). A point guard who showed this season he can handle the ball and run an offense, but the previous season played well off the ball with Lonzo Ball. A good shooter who can space the floor. There is some real upside, although he projects more as a backup PG/rotation player, but one who can defend and make plays. His brothers are Jrue Holiday of the Pelicans and Justin Holiday of the Bulls.

Blazers small icon 24. Portland Trail Blazers: Anfernee Simons, 6’4” shooting guard (IMG Academy). Considered one of the top recruits last season, he returned to prep school to make a high school to NBA jump (same as Thon Maker). He’s an elite athlete with a lot of upside, he has a good shot that needs polish, but he knows how to score (Simons tends to be ball dominant, plays more like a combo guard). He’s a project but a guy with a high upside.

Lakers small icon 25. Los Angeles Lakers: Moritz Wagner, 6’11” center (Michigan). He helped his stock in the NCAA tournament, being a key to the Wolverines’ run. He is a good shooter who can knock down threes and space the floor, but can also score off the dribble or in the post. He needs room to get off that jumper (slow release) and he doesn’t do much other than score (not a rebounder or shot blocker of any note). Likely a reserve big in the NBA.

Sixers small icon 26. Philadelphia 76ers: Landry Shamet, 6’4” point guard (Wichita St). He can shoot, he plays smart, he knows how to run an offense, and all that makes up for him being an average athlete (by NBA standards). He’s versatile, can fit the Sixers system, and projects as a backup point guard in the NBA. That’s not a position of need for the Sixers, but he could be a third guard or get a chance at the two.

Celtics small icon 27. Boston Celtics: Robert Williams, 6’10” center (Texas A&M). Things keep breaking Danny Ainge’s way — this is a steal at 27, some teams thought he could go in the late lottery. Williams has the tools to be an elite NBA defender — he’s got a 7’5.5” wingspan and incredible athleticism — and in college he used those tools to be a shot blocking and rebounding force. Can rim run and catch alley-oops but needs to expand his offensive game beyond that. This is a guy with a high ceiling, but there are serious questions about his work ethic and love of the game — is he going to put in the work to reach that potential?

Warriors small icon 28. Golden State Warriors: Jacob Evans, 6’6” wing, (Cincinnati). He passes the eye test as an NBA wing — he has good size, he defends well, and he can knock down threes. So yes, he sounds like a perfect fit on Golden State. He’s a player who is good at just about everything but not necessarily elite at any one thing. The concern is that he can just blend in and not be aggressive enough, but he does understand how to play a role, something he will get a chance to do in Golden State. Also, what’s his ring size?

Nets small icon 29. Brooklyn Nets: Dzanan Musa, 6’9” small forward (Bosnia and Herzegovina). He’s an aggressive swingman who is best attacking off the dribble and getting into the paint, where he’s a good scorer and playmaker. He plays with his heart on his sleeve (and occasionally goes over the top with it). Average athlete by NBA standards who has to prove he can defend at the NBA level. Heavily scouted for years, he’s just 19 with room to improve. He played last season in the Croatian league and wants to come over now, we’ll see if the Nets want to draft and stash for a year or two.

Hawks small icon 30. Atlanta Hawks: Omari Spellman, 6’9” power forward (Villanova). He plays a bruising style inside, but he can shoot the rock from the outside and has the handles to get a basket against a closeout. He plays below the rim and will have to find out ways to use his shooting to find space on the floor where he can operate. His conditioning needs to improve. Think a younger Mo Speights kind of game.

SECOND ROUND

Suns small icon 31. The Phoenix Suns: Elie Okobo, 6’3” point guard (France). He played last season for Pau-Orthez in the top level French league and averaged 13.2 points on 57 percent shooting (38 percent from threee) plus 4.4 assists per game. A 44-point game in the French playoffs turned some heads. He’s athletic, knows how to score, and has all the physical tools teams look for in a point guard. He’s going to have to develop and adapt to the NBA game, but this could be a very smart pick in the second round.

Grizzlies small icon 32. Memphis Grizzlies: Jevon Carter, 6’2” point guard (West Virginia). He’s aggressive defensively (maybe the best defensive PG in the draft), and he’s a good shooter and playmaker. He’s not an elite athlete, his first step isn’t going to blow by anybody, but he’s gritty and tough — perfect for the Memphis grit n’ grind. He should make a quality backup point guard behind Mike Conley in Memphis.

Hawks small icon 33. Atlanta Hawks: Jalen Brunson, 6’2” point guard (Villanova). He is bound for the Dallas Mavericks via trade. As he showed leading the Wildcats to the NCAA crown, he’s a high IQ player whose game is polished and NBA ready — he’s a pass-first point guard with great vision. Could be a Fred Van Vleet type. However, not athletic by NBA standards and struggled to defend elite point guards in college. Will make a good backup point guard who can help a team quickly, coaches will love him, but the ceiling is not that high.

Mavericks small icon 34. Dallas Mavericks: Devonte’ Graham, 6’2” point guard (Kansas). He is bound for Charlotte via trade. A four-year senior who was the Big 12 Player of the Year last season, he is a skilled point guard who can gets buckets and knows how to run a team. He’s not the level of athlete and has average size, but he projects as someone who can help an NBA right away as a solid backup point guard off the bench.

Magic small icon 35. Orlando Magic: Melvin Frazier, 6’6” small forward (Tulane). Great second round pick, a lot of teams projected him late in the first. Potential future “3&D” wing — he has a 7’2” wingspan and shot 38.5 percent from three. The questions revolve around whether he is really that good a shooter — he hit 55 percent of his free throws last season. He’s good at scoring on the move, but he’s going to have to learn how to move off the ball and catch-and-shoot at the NBA level. Still, great potential for a need position.

Knicks small icon 36. New York Knicks: Mitchell Robinson, 6’11” center (Western Kentucky). One of the top recruits of 2017, he signed with Western Kentucky, changed his mind and wanted to transfer out but couldn’t, said he wanted to return, then just spent the year in training for the draft. He’s a big man with elite athleticism and plays an old-school style as a rim protector on one end and a rim runner on the other. Going to take some time to develop, but a good gamble in the second round for the Knicks, if they can develop him.

Kings small icon 37. Sacramento Kings: Gary Trent Jr., 6’5” shooting guard (Duke). He has been traded to the Portland Trail Blazers, where he will fit in as a floor spacer. Trent Jr. is one of the best and most fearless shooters in this draft — he has NBA range and then some. His handles need to improve as do his playmaking to handle the closeouts that will come in the NBA, but if you can shoot (and shoot on the move) there is a place for you in the NBA.

Sixers small icon 38. Philadelphia 76ers: Khyri Thomas, 6-3 shooting guard (Creighton). He will be traded to Detroit, which is a steal for the Pistons. Thomas projects as a “3&D” style two-guard who was the Big East Defensive Player of the Year (the 6’10” wingspan helps) and shot 41 percent from three. His ball handling needs to improve, he’s going to have to get his shot off a little quicker at the NBA level, and he’s not the level of athlete that gives him a super-high ceiling, but he also has a high floor — he’s going to fit in and be able to help.

Sixers small icon 39. Philadelphia 76ers: Isaac Bonga, 6’8” small forward (Germany). A lot of potential but also a long way to go to get his skills to an NBA level. He’s a ball-handling wing with great pick-and-roll instincts both as a scorer and playmaker. His game overall, and his shot in particular, need to take leaps forward and against superior competition. A good roll of the dice in the second round that could pan out down the line.

Nets small icon 40. Brooklyn Nets: Rodions Kurucs, 6’9” forward (Latvia). Very possibly a draft-and-stash who stays to develop in Europe. He plays for FC Barcelona, although his minutes have been limited this past season. Plays hard and is a decent athlete who loves (and is good at) the midrange game but needs to stretch out his shot at the NBA level. His tools are intriguing but he has a lot of work to do to bring it all together.

Magic small icon 41. Orlando Magic: Jarred Vanderbilt, 6’8” small forward (Kentucky). He has been traded to the Denver Nuggets. He’s a physical player who is strong on the defensive end, and can score off the bounce on the other. He needs to improve his shot to stick in the NBA. He comes with foot injury concerns. He injured it twice in high school and it forced him to miss the start of the Wildcats’ season last year.

Pistons small icon 42. Detroit Pistons: Bruce Brown, 6’5” shooting guard (Miami). He has all the physical tools — good size, long wingspan (6’10”) and is athletic. Shows a lot of promise on the defensive end. The challenge is the offensive end, where he struggles with his shot and is turnover prone. Has potential as a rotation two guard with some development, but he’s a project.

Nuggets small icon 43. Denver Nuggets: Justin Jackson, 6’7” forward (Maryland). He has potential as a “3&D” wing with some development. He has great length for his size (7’3” wingspan) and in college he guarded positions 1-4. He plays with a high motor but is not an elite athlete. If his handles can improve and his jump shot becomes consistent — and his release becomes faster — he can find a role in the league.

Wizards small icon 44. Washington Wizards: Issuf Sanon, 6’4” guard (Ukraine). Likely a draft-and-stash, but one the Wizards could bring over in a few years. Sanon turned heads at the NBA Global Camp in Treviso, Italy, because he was a high-motor player who could both score and defend well. His shot needs to become more consistent, his defensive understanding needs to improve, but he’s not yet 19 and could develop into a solid NBA player.

Nets small icon 45. Brooklyn Nets: Hamidou Diallo, 6’5” shooting guard (Kentucky). He has been traded to the Charlotte Hornets. He is incredibly athletic and also incredibly raw. There’s a lot of potential here but he needs to develop his skills (which could mean stints in the D-League if he sticks with the Hornets, maybe a candidate for a two-way contract). He’s best in transition, and he attacks in the halfcourt with a fantastic first step. He can become a good defender, but his jumper still needs a lot of work.

Rockets small icon 46. Houston Rockets: De'Anthony Melton, 6’3” guard (USC). You may remember him as the focus of the FBI investigation that rocked college basketball, and with that he did not play last season. He spent the season working out then had to impress teams in workouts. He was a top recruit because of his athleticism, can guard positions 1-3, and he can do some ball handling.

Lakers small icon 47. Los Angeles Lakers: Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk, 6’8” shooting guard (Kansas). He’s from the Ukraine originally and averaged 14.6 points per game for Kansas last season. He’s got a good basketball IQ, can shoot the rock (44 percent from three last season), and has good size for the position. Real questions about his athleticism and if he can hang at the next level.

48. Minnesota Timberwolves: Keita Bates-Diop, 6-7 forward (Ohio St.). He’s got good size to play on the wing in the NBA, with the skills to post up smaller defenders and is a good shooter out on the perimeter. Out in transition he can be a force. However, he’s a bit slow footed and that shows up in both his first step on offense and concerns about him being a target of switches on defense. Can develop into a solid NBA role player.

Spurs small icon 49. San Antonio Spurs: Chimezie Metu, 6’10” power forward/center (USC). The man knows how to get buckets. He’s very athletic and put up some poster dunks. He’s also very raw and needs a lot of polish (a G-League stint is not out of the question). Good roll of the dice here deep in the second round for the Spurs.

Pacers small icon 50. Indiana Pacers: Alize Johnson, 6’9” power forward (Missouri St.). A power forward who can handle the rock and can do a little bit of everything, but doesn’t have that one standout NBA-level skill. Will have to earn his way onto the roster with Summer League/training camp play.

Pelicans small icon 51. New Orleans Pelicans: Tony Carr, 6’3” point guard (Penn St.). He’s got good size for a point guard, shot 43 percent from three last season, and has an old-man-at-the-Y game that gets him to the rim. The problem is his lack of athleticism means he struggles to finish when he does get to the rim, and there are questions about his defense.

Rockets small icon 52. Houston Rockets: Vince Edwards, 6’8″ forward (Purdue). He knows how to get buckets, averaging 14.6 points per game his senior season, and he can score on the move well. However, he is not athletic on the NBA level and with that struggles defensively. He’s going to have to show consistent shooting and improved defense to stick in the NBA.

Thunder small icon 53. Oklahoma City Thunder: Devon Hall, 6’5” shooting guard (Virginia). Good roll of the dice by the Thunder this deep in the draft. Hall was a core two-way player for the Cavaliers, and he has NBA level shooting ability and basketball IQ. There are questions about him being athletic enough for the next level, but he is the kind of guy who could develop into a role player.

Mavericks small icon 54. Dallas Mavericks: Shake Milton, 6’6” guard (SMU). He is headed to Philadelphia in a trade — and this could be the steal of the second round by the Sixers. Milton could play the one or the two, and has the length (7’1” wingspan) to defend 1-3. He battled injury at SMU and is considered a better shooter than he showed in college, and he has the handles to create space then shoot well off the bounce. He’s pass first as a PG and can force some things that become turnovers when he should have gotten his own shot.

Hornets small icon 55. Charlotte Hornets: Arnoldas Kulboka, 6’9″ forward (Lithuania). This is a draft-and-stash pick. A very good shooter with range who plays well off the ball with a high IQ game, but the question is does he have the athleticism to play in the NBA.

Sixers small icon 56. Philadelphia 76ers: Ray Spaulding, 6’10” center (Louisville). He is headed to Dallas as part of a trade. He passes the eye test and moves well for a big man. He came to Louisville highly recruited and with a world of potential, but he never seemed to live up to it. He needs to get stronger and be more consistent with his shot, but the big questions are about his motor. The potential is there.

Thunder small icon 57. Oklahoma City Thunder: Kevin Hervey, 6’7” small forward (Texas Arlington). He tore his right ACL in high school, and his left ACL last year. Considering that, it’s impressive that he bounced back to average 20.5 points per game this past season, then look good at the NBA Draft Combine. He can score around the rim and has a solid jumper. The concerns, as might have been expected, are how his knees hold up. There are also serious defensive concerns.

Nuggets small icon 58. Denver Nuggets: Thomas Welsh, 7’0″ center (UCLA). An old-school, throwback big man who knows how to score around the basket and has a midrange game out to about 15 feet. However, he’s not athletic enough and his game doesn’t fit with what is asked of the modern NBA big man. He entered the NBA a couple decades too late.

Suns small icon 59. The Phoenix Suns: George King, 6’6” small forward (Colorado). This was the Raptors’ pick before they traded it. He’s got an NBA-ready body, is plenty athletic, and knows how to shoot the rock. That all sounds good, but at age 24 already there are questions about how much better he gets, and he doesn’t have an NBA level first-step — he’s not quite able to create space at this level. Still, good roll of the dice this deep.

Sixers small icon 60. Philadelphia 76ers: Kostas Antetokounmpo, 6’10” forward (Dayton). He is headed to Dallas as part of a trade. The other Antetokounmpo — yes, he is Giannis Antetokounmpo‘s brother — isn’t the same level of prospect, but he has potential. The younger Antetokounmpo is raw — he is years away. He’s going to spend time in the G-League. He’s not a ball handling point forward, more of an athletic big who can block shots and run the floor — he does move with the speed and long strides of his brother. There’s a long way to go on his jumper.

James Harden: Media narrative contributed to Giannis Antetokounmpo winning MVP

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James Harden scored 36.1 points per game last season, the highest-scoring season since Michael Jordan. Harden’s 32-game 30-point streak was the second-longest streak ever. He scored 30 points against every team besides the Rockets.

My favorite Harden stat is just looking at the highest-scoring games of the season:

1. James Harden 61

1. James Harden 61

3. Kemba Walker 60

4. Devin Booker 59

5. James Harden 58

5. James Harden 58

7. James Harden 57

7. James Harden 57

9. LaMarcus Aldridge 56

10. James Harden 54

This was a special season.

So, why did Giannis Antetokounmpo win Most Valuable Player?

“Politics” was suggested to Harden.

Harden on 97.9 The Box:

I think the same way you think.

I think once the media, they create a narrative about somebody from the beginning of the year, I think they just take that narrative and run with it the entire year.

I don’t want to get into details. But all I can do is control what I can do, and I went out there and did what I was supposed to do at a high level. You know what I’m saying?

The season, there’s probably only a few seasons where anybody’s ever done that before.

People were tuned in onto how many points that I was going to score the next game. You know what I’m saying? It was a thing.

Harden is right. Narrative factors way too much into MVP voting.

Michael Jordan lost 1997 MVP to Karl Malone due to voter fatigue. In 2011, everyone was so mad about The Decision, voters picked Derrick Rose (and Dwight Howard) over LeBron James for MVP. Those results didn’t reflect what actually happened on the court.

As Houston started slow last season, Antetokounmpo became MVP favorite. That early inclination probably had an anchoring effect for final voting.

The most important step in eliminating biases is acknowledging biases. I have railed for years against letting narrative affect award voting. I think MVP should honor the player who had the best season. Nothing more, nothing less. When analyzing candidates, I make a concerted effort to separate superfluous factors like narrative.

I favored Harden a huge chunk of the season. I entered my final review expecting to pick Harden. But I ultimately landed on Antetokounmpo.

Antetokounmpo was excellent offensively – not as good as Harden, but close enough to offset the massive defensive difference. Caught up in Harden’s scoring brilliance, I hadn’t properly appreciated Antetokounmpo’s defense until late in the process.

Harden had a great year. It was widely judged to be the second-best year in the entire NBA. He should be proud of that.

It’s unsurprising he answered this way, though. After all, he he has been enabled by a general manager who once said Harden’s previous runner-up MVP finishes meant maybe the award shouldn’t exist at all.

Kings’ De’Aaron Fox: ‘I don’t crave to be in a big market’

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De'Aaron Fox was the breakout star of the Kings’ breakthrough season. The future looks bright in Sacramento.

But we’ve seen this story play out so many times. A young player excels in a small market then eventually moves to a more desirable destination. LeBron James, Kevin Durant, Anthony Davis, Kawhi Leonard, Paul George.

Will Fox be different?

Fox, via Corban Goble of ONE37pm:

“I don’t crave to be in a big market,” he says. “After last season, there was a buzz in Sacramento. Everyone in Sacramento is a Kings fan. If we start making the playoffs, or if we become a championship contender, the entire city is going to go nuts. That’s the difference between a big market and a small one.”

I’m glad Fox is happy in Sacramento. He had minimal say in getting there. The Kings picked him in a draft that gives teams massive control over top young prospects. That he landed somewhere he likes so much was largely coincidental. He could’ve easily wound up with Boston, Phoenix, Orlando, Minnesota or any other team picking in that range.

Some of this is Fox’s attitude. I suspect he would’ve found joy nearly anywhere. Now, he’s with the Kings and feeling positively about them.

They’ll have to continue to keep him happy as he approaches free agency. Unrestricted free agency is still several years away. A lot can change between now and then.

But Sacramento ought to feel good about Fox’s outlook now.

Damian Lillard on leaving Trail Blazers for super team: ‘We would win it, but what is the challenge or the fun in that?’

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Kevin Durant left for the Warriors for many reasons. LeBron James left for the Heat for many reasons. Anthony Davis and Paul George forced their way to Los Angeles for many reasons.

Those are life-altering moves. Nobody does something so consequential for a single purpose.

But whether or not it intended, each of those stars took an easier route to a championship. That’s just the reality.

Damian Lillard, on the other hand, has done so much to elevate himself then pull up the Trail Blazers with him. Lillard has often touted his loyalty to Portland. He showed it by signing a super-max extension that locks him in through 2025.

Lillard, via Adam Caparell of Complex:

“To leave, what did I invest all this time for just to leave, you know?” he says. “If I go play with three other stars, I don’t think that many people would doubt that I could win it. We would win it, but what is the challenge or the fun in that?”

I disagree with Lillard’s certainty about winning a title if he teamed with other stars. Not every perceived super team has won. A championship still must be earned. It’s not easy.

But it would be easier.

It also probably wouldn’t be as rewarding.

Durant has admitted winning a championship with Golden State didn’t fill the void he thought it would. Maybe for other reasons, but it’s easy to see the Warriors’ talent advantage as a reason. He joined a title contender and made it even better. He didn’t build that team. Perhaps, a championship with the Nets would mean more to him.

Lillard is less likely to win a title by staying Portland. I think he knows that. He enjoys the city, and the $196 million he projects to earn on his four-year extension doesn’t hurt, either.

But if Lillard ever wins a championship with the Trail Blazers, it would be so gratifying. That’s what he’s chasing.

Lillard made clear he’s not criticizing stars who chose an alternate path. He’s doing what’s right for him, just as they did what was right for them.

His quest should earn him plenty of fans. For everyone who disliked Durant joining Golden State because it offended their sensibilities of how a title pursuit should work, Lillard is a great foil.

Andre Iguodala recalls Draymond Green doubling Kevin Durant in practice: ‘he was mad … We was tryna win’

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Devin Booker complained to his opponents for double-teaming him during a pick-up game.

That has sparked a Great National Debate: Is it right or wrong to double-team during pick-up games?

Kevin Durant:

That’s a reasonable conclusion. The primary defender is missing an opportunity to work on his defense by getting help. But I also think it fails to address the main point. Booker wasn’t complaining to help the defender. Booker wanted the ideal training environment for himself, the offensive player.

How should the offensive player feel about it?

It’s a reasonably interesting question that’s getting taken far too seriously because the NBA is in a dead period. But to give it more juice, let’s add the Kevin Durant-Draymond Green relationship to the equation.

Andre Iguodala:

Durant:

It seems Durant can laugh it off now, but this story feeds into what so many people think they know about these players – that Green is a relentless competitor (accurate) and that Durant is soft (inaccurate).

NBA players spend so much time playing basketball. Sometimes, it’s helpful to face game-like conditions, where double-teams can happen at any point. Other times, it’s helpful to have more-relaxed conditions.

I don’t know enough about Booker’s pick-up game or the Warriors’ practice to say what was appropriate in each.