PBT Awards: Coach of the Year

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Kurt Helin

1. Brad Stevens, Celtics

2. Dwane Casey, Raptors

3. Quin Snyder, Jazz

This was the most difficult decision in all of the individual awards, and it started with just trying to narrow it down to three. Gregg Popovich led a Spurs team essentially without Kawhi Leonard to 47 wins and the playoffs. Brett Brown has spent years building a culture in Philly and it paid off. Terry Stotts, Mike D’Antoni, Nate McMillan and Doc Rivers all deserve credit. For me, Brad Stevens taking a team that lost Gordon Hayward five minutes into the season, plus had to lean on a rookie (Jayson Tatum) and a second-year guy (Jaylen Brown), and they got the two seed and had the best defense in the NBA speaks to the amazing job he has done there. He just nudges out Casey and Snyder.

Dan Feldman

1. Dwane Casey, Raptors

2. Brad Stevens, Celtics

3. Quin Snyder, Jazz

The Raptors’ eight-game improvement from last season underrates the job Dwane Casey has done. Remember, they were in line to take a step back this season as their core aged and they shed depth. But Casey implemented a new and improved offensive system (even if he deserves some blame for the previous iso-heavy scheme), got the defense cranked up and developed and empowered a mostly young and definitely elite bench. Brad Stevens nearly overtook him with a strong closing kick as the Celtics’ injuries woes continued to pile up. Quin Snyder’s coaching chops were evident in how his players trusted him – trusted him when Gordon Hayward left for (seemingly) greener pastures, trusted him when he handed the keys to the offense to rookie Donovan Mitchell, trusted him when the team dug a big hole early, trusted him when he demanded unselfishness. Not much separated the three coaches on my ballot and three others who fell just short. Getting James Harden and Chris Paul to mesh isn’t as easy as Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni made it look. Doc Rivers did his best coaching work since the Clippers hired him. Gregg Popovich kept Spurs humming, especially defensively, without Kawhi Leonard.

Dane Carbaugh

1. Mike D’Antoni, Rockets

2. Terry Stotts, Trail Blazers

3. Dwane Casey, Raptors

Mike D’Antoni did the impossible. He melded two players that had usage rates of 31% or more last season, then turned them into a one-two punch that essentially made it so Houston has a Hall of Fame point guard on the floor for 48 minutes a night. Plus the Rockets jumped 12 spots in defensive rating year-over-year. D’Antoni is one of the most important coaches in NBA history — first for the SSOL Suns and now in Houston — and he deserves it. Stotts gets second for realizing and openly, sternly motivating Jusuf Nurkic, one of the key cogs to that 13-game winning streak. Casey goes third for making the Raptors quietly scary for the first time, well, ever.