Rob Carr/Getty Images

Tomas Satoransky patches Wizards’ annual hole

1 Comment

DETROIT – Tomas Satoransky operates at his own pace.

The Wizards drafted Satoransky No. 32 in 2012, when he was playing for Sevilla. He didn’t feel ready for the NBA, so he stayed in Spain. His contract with Sevilla expired in 2014. He still didn’t feel ready and signed with Barcelona. He even signed an extension with Barcelona in 2016.

Later that year, Satoransky thought it was time. Still under contract with Barcelona, his buyout (reportedly about $2 million) was larger than what Washington could pay without it counting against the cap ($650,000). But Satoransky was so certain of his decision, he paid the remainder of the buyout himself. He knew that’d be a possibility and ensured his extension left the option open.

Yet – for all the years he spent timing his jump to the NBA juuust right – he realized his perception of the league was still based on his childhood in the Czech Republic.

“I just saw the stars, the shining moments and everything,” Satoransky said. “Obviously, when you come over, you have to also go through some tough times as a player, especially coming over from Europe, getting used to everything and like that. But once you have a good role in the NBA, you just feel like you’re blessed.”

By that standard, Satoransky is blessed.

And the Wizards might be, too.

Washington has struggled for years whenever John Wall sits. Eric Maynor, Garett Temple, Andre Miller, Ramon Sessions, Trey Burke, Brandon Jennings and Tim Frazier have cycled through as backup point guards. None did the job well enough. Wall called the Wizards’ bench their downfall last postseason, citing it as a reason he ran out of gas.

Satoransky might finally be the answer.

Since Wall’s first playoff season (2014), Washington has played like a 46-win to 54-win team with him on the court. In that same span, the Wizards’ win pace ranged from 16 to 29 whenever he sat. Teams obviously perform worse without their biggest star, but that gap was hard.

Washington has remained strong with Wall this year (52-win pace) – and is far better than usual without him (37-win pace).

Here’s the Wizards win paces the last five years, with Wall (red) and without him (blue):

image

This chart probably sells Satoransky short. Washington has also used Frazier and Sessions at point guard when Wall sits. But Satoransky has proven most effective. The Wizards play at a 47-win pace with him.

The idea Washington was better without Wall was always silly. But Satoransky’s strong play in his absence helped sparked the discussion – and earned him a larger role in the playoff rotation.

“He’s played well, and he deserves some extra minutes,” Wizards coach Scott Brooks said.

How is Satoransky flourishing? By continuing to put himself in comfortable positions.

That starts with his role.

“I don’t feel like I need to be a starter or anything,” Satoransky said. “That’s the thing the NBA has. You have to be a starter or a second-unit guy. It doesn’t bother me. And I don’t understand too much. For me, coming from Europe, it makes much more sense that you have 12 players and they all play based on how they play in the game. That’s what I get used to. I understand you cannot have it here, for some reason.”

And it continues on the court, where Satoransky plays so cerebrally.

He ranks sixth in the NBA in assist-to-turnover ratio. The leaderboard with per-game numbers:

image

Satoransky’s 3-point percentage (47.4) would lead the league – if he shot enough 3s to qualify. He’s just so selective (which obviously contributes to his high efficiency).

Satoransky is also deadly on floaters, but he also passes up too many of them. Even Brooks – who says he mostly likes Satoransky’s methodical style – wants the point guard to take more floaters.

“People around me, they’re always like I should be more aggressive,” Satoransky said. “But it’s just the way I was taught to play the game, right way, in Europe.

“Mentally for me it’s tough, but for sure I think in the NBA, you have to be a little bit – in some moments – a little selfish.”

Satoransky could probably handle it. He doesn’t restrain his game purely out of necessity. At 6-foot-7 with above-the-rim athleticism he only shows in flashes, he could do more.

“I never force anything,” Satoransky said.

Except his way into the Wizards’ playoff rotation.

Washington (42-38) will enter the postseason as the No. 6, No. 7 or No 8 seed. The team has plenty of internal problems. Advancing is more unlikely than likely.

But, for once, backup point guard probably won’t be the primary reason for elimination.

As expected, Nets release Iman Shumpert with the return of Wilson Chandler

Mike Stobe/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Iman Shumpert was never the long play for Brooklyn.

When Caris LeVert went out a month ago due to a ligament issue with his thumb, and with Wilson Chandler out due to his PED suspension, the Nets needed to add depth for the short term (and the league granted them a roster exception). They turned to Iman Shumpert.

However, with Chandler set to return this weekend and LeVert is not far behind, that means the Nets had to clear a roster spot. Shumpert was the guy without a chair when the music stopped.

Shumpert played 18.5 minutes a game for Brooklyn, and while he wasn’t putting up numbers — he averaged 4.2 points and 2.6 rebounds a game — he played solid defense for him and the Nets are 9-4 with him in the rotation. Shumpert was helping the Nets win now, but Brooklyn remains focused on the long term and developing players such as Rodions Kurucs and Dzanan Musa.

Shumpert took it all in stride.

Shumpert’s play could land him with another team soon.

Rumor: Paul George was indicating Pacers fans should boo Larry Bird

Paul George Larry Bird
Ron Hoskins/NBAE via Getty Images
Leave a comment

Pacers fans booed Clippers forward Paul George earlier this week, which seems logical enough. After all, he’s a star who left their favorite team (without putting them over the top for their first championship).

But George said there’s more to the story of his Indiana exit, “and I promise you, I’m not the one to boo.”

Brian Windhorst on ESPN:

I spent this morning talking to some people in Indiana, and only Paul really knows. I guess we’ll have to wait tell-all digital short, Uninterrupted special. But the belief in Indiana is that he’s referring to Larry Bird.

It’s important to reiterate: George didn’t say Larry Bird. This is other people speculating. People who might know, which is why this is relevant. But other people speculating, nonetheless.

While with the Pacers, George and Bird sometimes butted heads:

  • Their biggest public clash came in 2015. Bird wanted George to play more power forward. George resisted spending too much time at the position, preferring small forward. Bird noted he was the boss. George eventually came around.
  • Though he said George wouldn’t play until comfortable, Bird played up the possibility of George returning from his Team USA injury late in the 2014-15 season. George said he was on the fence about playing, and then-Pacers coach Frank Vogel tried to pump the brakes.  Ultimately, George played the final six games of the season.
  • Bird also reprimanded George for tweets about Ray Rice and domestic violence in 2014. George apologized for his comments.

In 2016, Bird said he had a standing max offer to George. So, if there were any major problems prior, they didn’t bother Bird too much.

Bird also resigned as Pacers president before George left. Adrian Wojnarowski’s report on George telling the team he’d leave even included this line:

George had a close relationship with the architect of those Pacers teams, Larry Bird, who recently stepped down as team president to become a franchise consultant.

It doesn’t really add up, which makes me wonder: Is the current Pacers regime – led by president Kevin Pritchard – trying to shift blame for something onto Bird? It’s also possible Windhorst’s sources have no nefarious intent and are just simply wrong about Bird being George’s target.

Or they could be right. Maybe Bird crossed George in a way unrelated to anything we know publicly. Or maybe George just holds one of these relatively insignificant issues in greater regard than the rest of us.

If George were referring to Bird – a homegrown basketball legend who coached the Pacers to their first NBA Finals then later took over in the front office and built them back into a contender – good luck convincing Indiana fans to boo Bird over George.

Report: Cavaliers seeking first-rounder for Kevin Love, other teams seeking first-rounder for taking Kevin Love

Kevin Love
Maddie Meyer/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Kevin Love doesn’t fit on the Cavaliers.

He’s a good veteran. They’re a bad team. His talent would be better served on a team ready to win now. Cleveland is unlikely to reach that level during Love’s remaining prime.

But…

Jason Lloyd of The Athletic:

The Cavs are asking for a first-round pick in exchange for Love, one source with knowledge of the situation said. But teams are actually asking for a first-round pick from Cleveland just to absorb the final 3 1/2 years on his deal.

This is why Love didn’t crack my preseason list of players most likely to get traded this season. He has a $28,942,830 salary this season, and he’s due $91,459,342 over the next three years. The Cavaliers signed him to this contract to be an asset. Other teams view the 31-year-old as a liability.

A first-round pick going in opposite directions is a large gap to overcome.

Still, this is how negotiations work. There’s plenty of time for Cleveland and another team to find common ground.

With Love reportedly preferring a trade, the Cavs might want to help someone who helped them win a championship. They might also benefit from removing a sulking player amid resistance to coach John Beilein.

No other team looks desperate to add an offensively talented power forward. But that could change quickly with an injury, an unrelated trade or even just the progression of a season.

Love getting traded would be unsurprising. It also doesn’t appear close to happening.

Report: Knicks considering hiring new coach during season

Knicks coach Mike Miller
Mike Stobe/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Knicks lost eight straight games then fired David Fizdale as coach.

The losing streak reached 10 games under interim coach Mike Miller, culminating with a 28-point setback to the Trail Blazers on Tuesday. New York blew a 22-point lead to the lowly Warriors last night, but rallied in overtime to finally end the skid.

Still, Miller hasn’t exactly galvanized the Knicks.

Ramona Shelburne of ESPN:

there have already been ownership-level discussions about hiring a new coach in-season if the team continues to crater, according to sources.

I bet Knicks president Steve Mills wants to hire a new coach. Mills is on the hot seat, and he could sell owner James Dolan on getting a chance to build the roster around a new coach. It’d be like when Mills seized control of the front office by signing Tim Hardaway Jr. to a huge contract before Dolan could find another lead executive to replace Phil Jackson.

Dolan should fire Mills by the start of next offseason and let Mills’ replacement pick a coach. Mills has done a poor job. Hiring a new coach now would only bother potential replacement executives.

This is a lost year for New York. Maybe a better coach could help avoid some embarrassing setbacks, but the Knicks won’t accomplish anything notable this year. They might as well just enjoy the silver lining that all their errors will net another high draft pick.

In the last three decades, just two teams have ousted multiple head coaches for performance during a season:

  • 2014-15 Kings: Mike Malone and Tyrone Corbin to hire  George Karl
  • 2004-05 Nuggets: Jeff Bzdelik and Michael Cooper to hire George Karl

Karl is available. So are more-mentioned names like Mark Jackson and Jeff Van Gundy. Though it hasn’t happened in a while, a team could also pluck another team’s assistant coach during the season.