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Tomas Satoransky patches Wizards’ annual hole

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DETROIT – Tomas Satoransky operates at his own pace.

The Wizards drafted Satoransky No. 32 in 2012, when he was playing for Sevilla. He didn’t feel ready for the NBA, so he stayed in Spain. His contract with Sevilla expired in 2014. He still didn’t feel ready and signed with Barcelona. He even signed an extension with Barcelona in 2016.

Later that year, Satoransky thought it was time. Still under contract with Barcelona, his buyout (reportedly about $2 million) was larger than what Washington could pay without it counting against the cap ($650,000). But Satoransky was so certain of his decision, he paid the remainder of the buyout himself. He knew that’d be a possibility and ensured his extension left the option open.

Yet – for all the years he spent timing his jump to the NBA juuust right – he realized his perception of the league was still based on his childhood in the Czech Republic.

“I just saw the stars, the shining moments and everything,” Satoransky said. “Obviously, when you come over, you have to also go through some tough times as a player, especially coming over from Europe, getting used to everything and like that. But once you have a good role in the NBA, you just feel like you’re blessed.”

By that standard, Satoransky is blessed.

And the Wizards might be, too.

Washington has struggled for years whenever John Wall sits. Eric Maynor, Garett Temple, Andre Miller, Ramon Sessions, Trey Burke, Brandon Jennings and Tim Frazier have cycled through as backup point guards. None did the job well enough. Wall called the Wizards’ bench their downfall last postseason, citing it as a reason he ran out of gas.

Satoransky might finally be the answer.

Since Wall’s first playoff season (2014), Washington has played like a 46-win to 54-win team with him on the court. In that same span, the Wizards’ win pace ranged from 16 to 29 whenever he sat. Teams obviously perform worse without their biggest star, but that gap was hard.

Washington has remained strong with Wall this year (52-win pace) – and is far better than usual without him (37-win pace).

Here’s the Wizards win paces the last five years, with Wall (red) and without him (blue):

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This chart probably sells Satoransky short. Washington has also used Frazier and Sessions at point guard when Wall sits. But Satoransky has proven most effective. The Wizards play at a 47-win pace with him.

The idea Washington was better without Wall was always silly. But Satoransky’s strong play in his absence helped sparked the discussion – and earned him a larger role in the playoff rotation.

“He’s played well, and he deserves some extra minutes,” Wizards coach Scott Brooks said.

How is Satoransky flourishing? By continuing to put himself in comfortable positions.

That starts with his role.

“I don’t feel like I need to be a starter or anything,” Satoransky said. “That’s the thing the NBA has. You have to be a starter or a second-unit guy. It doesn’t bother me. And I don’t understand too much. For me, coming from Europe, it makes much more sense that you have 12 players and they all play based on how they play in the game. That’s what I get used to. I understand you cannot have it here, for some reason.”

And it continues on the court, where Satoransky plays so cerebrally.

He ranks sixth in the NBA in assist-to-turnover ratio. The leaderboard with per-game numbers:

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Satoransky’s 3-point percentage (47.4) would lead the league – if he shot enough 3s to qualify. He’s just so selective (which obviously contributes to his high efficiency).

Satoransky is also deadly on floaters, but he also passes up too many of them. Even Brooks – who says he mostly likes Satoransky’s methodical style – wants the point guard to take more floaters.

“People around me, they’re always like I should be more aggressive,” Satoransky said. “But it’s just the way I was taught to play the game, right way, in Europe.

“Mentally for me it’s tough, but for sure I think in the NBA, you have to be a little bit – in some moments – a little selfish.”

Satoransky could probably handle it. He doesn’t restrain his game purely out of necessity. At 6-foot-7 with above-the-rim athleticism he only shows in flashes, he could do more.

“I never force anything,” Satoransky said.

Except his way into the Wizards’ playoff rotation.

Washington (42-38) will enter the postseason as the No. 6, No. 7 or No 8 seed. The team has plenty of internal problems. Advancing is more unlikely than likely.

But, for once, backup point guard probably won’t be the primary reason for elimination.

Minnesota signs undrafted rookie Naz Reid to multiyear deal

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MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Timberwolves have signed rookie center Naz Reid to a multiyear contract, upgrading the two-way deal they initially gave him before a strong performance for the team’s entry in the NBA Summer League in Las Vegas.

The new contract, completed Thursday, all but ensures that Reid will be on the regular-season roster, after going undrafted out of LSU.

Jon Krawczynski of The Athletic broke the story.

The 6-foot-10, 250-pound Reid averaged 11.9 points and 5.4 rebounds in 18.6 minutes over seven summer league games against other clubs largely composed of rookies and second-year players. The Timberwolves’ team reached the championship game.

Reid averaged 13.6 points and a team-high 7.2 rebounds in his lone season at LSU, which reached the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament.

Bulls bring back Shaquille Harrison on one-year contract

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Shaquille Harrison started last season as an afterthought at the end of the Chicago Bulls’ bench. Then, because Cameron Payne was not good and Kris Dunn got injured (and was really not that good, either), Harrison got his chance — and took it. He was a defender Fred Hoiberg and then Jim Boylen could trust, and he played in the final 72 Bulls games last season at almost 20 minutes a night.

He will be back with the Bulls next season, the team announced.

While not announced, this is a one-year minimum contract. The Bulls waived Harrison back on July 6 as they remade the roster, but Harrison played one game at Summer League for the Bulls and they decided to bring him back.

Harrison is a Boylen favorite — he plays hard and defends well — and while minutes will be harder to come by behind Tomas Satoransky and Coby White, Harrison is a guy Boylen wants on the bench.

Dunn is on the roster at point guard, too, but the Bulls are rumored to be looking to trade him and his $5.4 million salary. Chicago will likely have to throw in a sweetener, like a decent second-round pick, to make that happen.

Nike countersues Kawhi Leonard over ‘Klaw’ logo

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“My mind on my money and my money on my mind.”
—Snoop Dogg

Nike and Kawhi Leonard are going to court over control of his “Klaw” logo, and it’s all about money and brand.

Leonard left Nike last season, eventually signing with New Balance, and he wants to be able to market his Klaw logo as part of his line with his new company. Leonard and his representatives sued Nike for control of the logo, saying Leonard came up with it in his own drawings.

Nike has countersued and said Leonard did not design the logo. Tim Bontemps of ESPN had these quotes from the countersuit itself.

“In this action, Kawhi Leonard seeks to re-write history by asserting that he created the ‘Claw Design’ logo, but it was not Leonard who created that logo. The ‘Claw Design’ was created by a talented team of NIKE designers, as Leonard, himself, has previously admitted…

“In his Complaint, Leonard alleges he provided a design to NIKE. That is true. What is false is that the design he provided was the Claw Design. Not once in his Complaint does Leonard display or attach either the design that he provided or the Claw Design. Instead, he conflates the two, making it appear as though those discrete works are one and the same. They are not.”

TMZ posted the designs.

I’m not about to guess what a judge would decide in this case. Most likely, this gets settled one way or another.

Meanwhile, New Balance is trying to come up with a new slogan for Leonard and his gear. King of the North is now out after his move to the Los Angeles Clippers this summer.

J.R. Smith reportedly meets with Bucks to talk contract

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After five seasons in Cleveland, the Cavaliers waived J.R. Smith. The 34-year-old veteran wing is not part of the Cavaliers future, and by waiving him before the guarantee date they only had to pay him $4.4 million of this $15.7 million salary.

That makes Smith a free agent.

He sat down with the Bucks on Thursday, according to Shams Charania of The Athletic.

The Bucks can only offer minimum contracts at this point.

Smith will turn 34 before next season starts and his skills are in decline, he shot just 30.8 percent from three last season. The Bucks will likely start Khris Middleton and Wesley Matthews on the wing with Sterling Brown, Pat Connaughton, and Donte DiVincenzo behind them. They have the roster spot to make the addition. The questions are does Smith fit, does he want the small role that’s really available, and how often will he wear a shirt around the facility?