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Is Jay Wright the next Brad Stevens?

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Starting in just a little over a week, NBA coaches’ heads will roll and there will be a search in cities across the NBA for their next head coach — at least five openings will be there, and there could be as many as seven or eight (I’ve had one source get into double digits), depending upon who you talk to around the league. As those searches start, the usual list of names of former NBA coaches will come up — Jeff Van Gundy, David Fizdale, etc… — as will the names of deserving up-and-coming assistants such as Nick Nurse (Toronto), Stephen Silas (Charlotte), and Jerry Stackhouse, among many others.

Other teams will look into the college ranks, trying to find the next Brad Stevens. Which may well be impossible, but it’s something a lot of teams discuss in the wake of Steven’s success (and to a lesser extent, Billy Donovan).

Which leads us to Villanova’s Jay Wright. He has led the Wildcats to two of the last three NCAA titles, built a powerhouse in the Delaware Valley, and he knows how to develop players, all meaning he is going to get feelers, and calls, from NBA front offices.

It leads to two questions:

Does Wright want to leave Villanova?

If he decides to, would his style of play and coaching fit at the NBA level?

Sources I spoke to for this article think the answer to the second question is a resounding yes. But the first question…

More than one person used the Mike Krzyzewski example with Wright — a guy who may be tempted by the siren call of the NBA, who will consider it on some level, but who is grounded, knows what he wants, and pretty much has that where he is at right now. He’s built his perfect job at Villanova. Look at Wright’s comment after winning the title Monday night.

“I just have the best job in the country. I’m in my hometown, my wife’s alma mater, my favorite team growing up. … I just love going to work every day. Our guys graduate. You see these kids are great kids to coach. As a coach, there’s just nothing better.”

Every coach at every college program talks about “building a family” but Wright has actually done it at Villanova. NBA players from the school’s past — Kyle Lowry through Josh Hart and Ryan Arcidiacono — were in San Antonio for the title game. Wright has built a program poised for a long run of success because he’s not stocking the roster with one-and-dones, he’s getting guys maybe half-a-step or a step down the recruitment ladder and coaching them up. He has a team that believes in and plays a system (Villanova’s ability to switch up pick-and-roll coverages seamlessly on the fly in the title game was impressive). Here is what Hart said after the title game:

“He has such a legacy here, such a footprint. We love him. We don’t want him to go. It’s such a great culture. Everyone says, ‘Oh yeah, we’re a family.’ But when you see when someone falls down and four guys sprint to go pick him up, that’s a winning culture. That’s a brotherhood. Not everybody does that. People say it. But we believe it. Coach Wright’s the best coach in the country, period.”

But that siren call of the NBA is still there. If Wright has NBA aspirations, he should make the move soon. He is 56 years old, he’s got the energy, and an NBA team worth going to will close to double his current $2.6 million salary (money does always matter).

Wright is going to have teams reaching out this summer, but he’s also in a position to be a bit picky — he doesn’t have to take the first offer to come his way if he doesn’t trust management and ownership. Which is what he’s done in the past, he’s gotten calls and brushed them aside. Most publicly, thee Suns reportedly reached out in 2016 (after Villanova’s previous NCAA title) and he turned them down.

If he decides to jump into the NBA waters, he should be patient and find the right fit, much as Stevens did when leaving Butler. Let’s use the Bucks as an example — every coach looking for a better situation (and that includes some guys with NBA jobs already) sees that roster with Giannis Antetokounmpo and good role players around him and wants that job (which will be open once their playoff run ends). However, it’s also a franchise with an ownership divided enough that they had to settle on a compromise GM last summer because they couldn’t agree and there was a power struggle. (Not to diminish Jon Horst, who I think has done a good job in that role.) Is that something Wright sees as comfortable enough to leave Villanova for? When Phoenix calls (and they will) would he trust that ownership and management? Should he?

If Wright does find a fit and heads to the NBA, there is little question that he has all the tools to be a success.

The biggest adjustment for many NCAA coaches coming to the NBA is the shift in power structure. In college, the head coach is the CEO of the program and has control over the recruitment and roster, he can control the schedule, and the rest. It’s a great job for a control freak or a big ego (think John Calipari). At the NBA level the coach is not the guy with the power — a star player will have far more say and has more value to the franchise. The GM picks the roster. And the coach has many more people to answer to.

Wright is a guy who can handle that, he’s not the guy with the oversized ego, nor is he the level of control freak some coaches are.

Maybe more importantly, front offices have seen player development at Villanova under Wright that is crucial in today’s NBA. He turned Mikal Bridges into a likely lottery pick in this draft, and Donte DiVincenzo into a Final Four hero — neither was a massively high recruit. That is needed in the NBA. Look at the Warriors and, with the exception of Kevin Durant, they drafted lower and developed Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, and Draymond Green (not to mention the rest of that roster). The teams that can sustain success develop players in house to at least be solid parts of the rotation (San Antonio is the gold standard, and you see it though coming up in Boston and Philadelphia).

On the court, you can see where Wright’s style would work, too. His teams play fast, he’s not afraid to go small, and he gets the need to use ball screens and actions to free up shooters. His teams also defend well. He can handle the Xs and Os.

The question with Wright isn’t can he be successful in the NBA, it’s does he want to make the leap?

The answer to that may be no, but suitors will come calling this summer.

Hawks progressing nicely in rebuild

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

It seems as if the Hawks have been rebuilding for ages.

Really, they’re only one season removed from a decade-long playoff streak, the NBA’s second-longest at the time.

General manager Travis Schlenk has swiftly done what his predecessors didn’t – dismantle a team that won 60 games and commit to rebuilding. In fact, Schlenk has advanced far enough that he’s already well into building Atlanta back up.

Only Kent Bazemore remains the playoff-series-winning team in 2016, let alone the 60-win squad in 2015. Heck, only Taurean Prince, DeAndre’ Bembry and Bazemore remain from the team Schlenk inherited just last year.

The Hawks aren’t done dismantling. They’re poised to tank another season. But their rebuild has already seen a defining move.

On draft night, Atlanta traded the rights to No. 3 pick Luka Doncic to the Mavericks for the rights to No. 5 pick Trae Young and a future first-round pick. That decision will take year to evaluate and will linger over both franchises far longer.

For now, it seems about fair. I rated Doncic ahead of Young and both above their draft slots. The Dallas pick – top-five protected the next two years, top-three protected the following two years and unprotected in 2023 – roughly bridges the gap between the players.

If the Hawks preferred Young anyway, they did a great job leveraging an extra first-rounder and still getting their man.

Atlanta’s other first-round picks – Kevin Huerter (No. 19) and Omari Spellman (No. 30) – were also sound. Squint hard enough, and Young and Huerter comprise a backcourt that somewhat resembles Stephen Curry and Klay Thompson. That’s the easy comparison considering Schlenk came from the Warriors’ front office, though that’d probably make Spellman the next Marreese Speights.

And that’s make Dennis Schroder the next Monta Ellis, a talented player it was time to move. Though Schroder is just 24, he’s too combustible with and away from the team. Young is the Hawks’ future at point guard.

Rather than pay Schroder $46.5 million over the next three years, Atlanta is better off sinking $25,534,253 into a waived Carmelo Anthony this season. And the Hawks got a potential first-rounder in the deal!

The Thunder pick is lottery-protected in 2022. Otherwise, it converts into two second-rounders. So, there’s a decent chance Atlanta never receives a first-rounder. But unloading Schroder, who had negative value to many teams around the league, was enough. Getting a pick or two – who knows how good Oklahoma City will be in four years? – is gravy.

The Hawks also swapped Mike Muscala for Justin Anderson in the three-way trade with the Thunder and 76ers. For this team in this league, going from the 27-year-old center to a 24-year-old small forward  is an upgrade. Anderson must gain traction in his career, but it’s worth the bet he does so in Atlanta.

Alex Len makes sense as another flier. The former No. 5 pick had moments in five years with the Suns, and he took major strides forward last season. Perhaps, the 25-year-old is on the verge of emerging as capable of being in a good team’s rotation. I’m surprised the price (guaranteed $8.51 million over two years) was so high, but the Hawks had cap space to burn. Better to get their preferred project center.

To that end, Atlanta splurged a lot of its cap room on Jeremy Lin, getting the point guard with just a smattering of second-round considerations going between Atlanta and Brooklyn. Could that cap space have been put to better use, like a salary dump or even just saving ownership money? Did the Hawks acquire Lin as a fan draw? Will Lin generate more revenue than his $13,768,421 salary? He could work well as a veteran mentor, but that’s a lot to pay a veteran mentor.

With Young, John Collins and Taurean Prince at the forefront and Spellman, Anderson and Len diversifying the portfolio, the Hawks have a nice core to build around. They’ll add to it with their own first-rounder, the extra first-rounder from Dallas and a potential first-rounder from Cleveland (top-10 protected the next two years or else it becomes two second-rounders).

Atlanta lost a good coach in Mike Budenholzer, but he didn’t seem eager to oversee a rebuild. Lloyd Pierce, known for player development and teaching defense, takes over. Like practically every first-time NBA head coach, Pierce is a roll of a dice. Maybe the Hawks could have leveraged Budenholzer into securing compensation from another team for letting him leave or even just paying off less of contract. Instead, they just sent him packing.

Sometimes, it’s best to make a clean break and move on.

Offseason grade: B-

Rockets GM Daryl Morey on Warriors signing DeMarcus Cousins: ‘It’s a little bit hard on paper to figure out how to make it work’

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DeMarcus Cousins picking the Warriors sent shockwaves through the NBA. You know they were felt in Houston, where Rockets general manager Daryl Morey is admittedly obsessed with beating Golden State.

Morey on The Dan Patrick Show:

I was really curious. Bob is really good at his job, and he likes to take smart gambles like I do. So, I understood the move. But it’s gonna be interesting. Coach Kerr is one of the best, too. So, it’s a little scary. They’ll probably figure out how to make it work, but it’s a little bit hard on paper to figure out how to make it work. But we do that well and so do they, obviously. They’re gonna be a tough out again, obviously. They’re arguably the best team in NBA history. They’re on their path to maybe be able to make that argument.

Cousins isn’t a seamless fit with the Warriors.

They like to run, and Cousins doesn’t always sprint up court – even before his torn Achilles. Their offense is predicated on quick ball movement, and Cousins likes to survey the floor. They have more efficient scoring options in Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson, and Cousins is used to being a focal point. They like to switch defensively, and Cousins isn’t as comfortable guarding on the perimeter.

But Cousins is so talented, and the Warriors can afford to be patient as he recovers from his injury. They’re elite already.

I also believe Golden State will slow its tempo and play more traditional defense as its core ages. Cousins might fit better with next season’s Warriors than previous iterations of the team.

So, I think Morey is spot on. Golden State general manager Bob Myers was targeting wings for a reason. The Warriors didn’t exactly need another center – especially a slow-paced, ball-dominant, offensive-minded one. But when Cousins fell into their lap, signing him was well worth the relatively low cost.

Rumor: Pelicans will try to trade for wing help, likely around deadline

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The New Orleans Pelicans look like a playoff team (or at least a potential one in the deep West). They have the superstar in Anthony Davis, and he’s part of a well-fitting front line with Nikola Mirotic and Julius Randle. The Pelicans also are strong at the point guard spot with Jrue Holiday starting.

Where New Orleans need help is the wing. They had hoped Solomon Hill could be the man there, but he has not stayed healthy or panned out. E’Twaun Moore filled in for him, but was overmatched covering larger players at the three. Darius Miller can give them minutes but is not the answer. Pelicans GM Dell Demps wanted to make a move this summer, but up against the salary cap they didn’t have to room to chase quality free agents.

So look for them to try and pull off an in-season trade, reports Scott Kushner of the New Orleans Advocate.

History (and several league sources) indicates Demps is waiting for a midseason trade to strike. As teams around the league see their postseason prospects dim, and grow eager to exchange a quality player for expiring salaries or the Pelicans’ always-endangered first round pick, there’s opportunity to shore up their most glaring weakness.

It’s exactly what Demps did to acquire Cousins from Sacramento in 2017 and Mirotic a year later from Chicago. Both are impactful veterans who were added without surrendering foundational players.

Various sources and several reports said the Pelicans were active in trade talks this summer, notably with the tanking Atlanta Hawks for Kent Bazemore. But with so few teams eager to dump quality players before opening tip, hoping to make a playoff run of their own, the cost was too steep.

Demps know the Pelicans are on the clock — Davis has this season and one more on his contract (there is a player option for a third season, but he almost certainly will opt out at that point). The Pelicans can offer him the “super max” contract at that point, and Davis has said he wants to stay and win in New Orleans, but if the team struggles and/or he gets a sense that ownership is not all-in on winning, he could choose to look around as a free agent.

Which means Demps and the Pelicans will do what it takes to win now, and a move at the trade deadline is possible. The Hawks still will listen to offers for Bazemore, and other wings will become available. It’s just something to watch as we head into the season.

 

Paul Pierce: ‘There is no loyalty to a franchise anymore … That’s the generation we live in’

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After Kevin Durant left the Thunder for the Warriors, Paul Pierce criticized players for changing teams to win.

Now, Pierce is providing an assessment of players just changing teams generally.

Brian Robb of Boston Sports Journal:

To be fair, Pierce doesn’t criticize players for not being loyal to franchises. In fact, he brings up that players are exercising their power.

But it’s still hard not to infer at least some disapproval from Pierce.

Why should players be loyal to franchises, though? Top players are assigned to teams through an anti-labor draft, the least successful teams getting the highest priority of selection. Those players are kept on an artificially low wage for five years can’t unilaterally leave the team for five years. If he plays well enough, his original team has a huge financial advantage in keeping him for up to 14 years. In this system, teams exercise far more control than they earn loyalty.

Players have such short careers. They should chase whatever they want. Money, winning, role, location, even steadiness with a franchise – if they choose.

Pierce spent 15 years with the Celtics, but let’s not forget:

Pierce asked the Mavericks to trade for him in 2005 so he could play with Dirk Nowitzkion a team one star away from contending. In 2007, he reportedly told the Celtics to trade him if they didn’t add a second star. Boston, of course, traded for Ray Allen and then convinced Kevin Garnett to waive his no-trade clause. In 2013, Pierce helped engineer a trade to the Nets. He and Garnett joined Deron Williams, Joe Johnson and Brook Lopezin Brooklyn and Pierce said, “We’re all about winning a championship and Brooklyn, we feel, gives us the best opportunity.” After stints with the Nets and Wizards, Pierce signed with the Clippers, which he described as a super team.