Is Jay Wright the next Brad Stevens?

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Starting in just a little over a week, NBA coaches’ heads will roll and there will be a search in cities across the NBA for their next head coach — at least five openings will be there, and there could be as many as seven or eight (I’ve had one source get into double digits), depending upon who you talk to around the league. As those searches start, the usual list of names of former NBA coaches will come up — Jeff Van Gundy, David Fizdale, etc… — as will the names of deserving up-and-coming assistants such as Nick Nurse (Toronto), Stephen Silas (Charlotte), and Jerry Stackhouse, among many others.

Other teams will look into the college ranks, trying to find the next Brad Stevens. Which may well be impossible, but it’s something a lot of teams discuss in the wake of Steven’s success (and to a lesser extent, Billy Donovan).

Which leads us to Villanova’s Jay Wright. He has led the Wildcats to two of the last three NCAA titles, built a powerhouse in the Delaware Valley, and he knows how to develop players, all meaning he is going to get feelers, and calls, from NBA front offices.

It leads to two questions:

Does Wright want to leave Villanova?

If he decides to, would his style of play and coaching fit at the NBA level?

Sources I spoke to for this article think the answer to the second question is a resounding yes. But the first question…

More than one person used the Mike Krzyzewski example with Wright — a guy who may be tempted by the siren call of the NBA, who will consider it on some level, but who is grounded, knows what he wants, and pretty much has that where he is at right now. He’s built his perfect job at Villanova. Look at Wright’s comment after winning the title Monday night.

“I just have the best job in the country. I’m in my hometown, my wife’s alma mater, my favorite team growing up. … I just love going to work every day. Our guys graduate. You see these kids are great kids to coach. As a coach, there’s just nothing better.”

Every coach at every college program talks about “building a family” but Wright has actually done it at Villanova. NBA players from the school’s past — Kyle Lowry through Josh Hart and Ryan Arcidiacono — were in San Antonio for the title game. Wright has built a program poised for a long run of success because he’s not stocking the roster with one-and-dones, he’s getting guys maybe half-a-step or a step down the recruitment ladder and coaching them up. He has a team that believes in and plays a system (Villanova’s ability to switch up pick-and-roll coverages seamlessly on the fly in the title game was impressive). Here is what Hart said after the title game:

“He has such a legacy here, such a footprint. We love him. We don’t want him to go. It’s such a great culture. Everyone says, ‘Oh yeah, we’re a family.’ But when you see when someone falls down and four guys sprint to go pick him up, that’s a winning culture. That’s a brotherhood. Not everybody does that. People say it. But we believe it. Coach Wright’s the best coach in the country, period.”

But that siren call of the NBA is still there. If Wright has NBA aspirations, he should make the move soon. He is 56 years old, he’s got the energy, and an NBA team worth going to will close to double his current $2.6 million salary (money does always matter).

Wright is going to have teams reaching out this summer, but he’s also in a position to be a bit picky — he doesn’t have to take the first offer to come his way if he doesn’t trust management and ownership. Which is what he’s done in the past, he’s gotten calls and brushed them aside. Most publicly, thee Suns reportedly reached out in 2016 (after Villanova’s previous NCAA title) and he turned them down.

If he decides to jump into the NBA waters, he should be patient and find the right fit, much as Stevens did when leaving Butler. Let’s use the Bucks as an example — every coach looking for a better situation (and that includes some guys with NBA jobs already) sees that roster with Giannis Antetokounmpo and good role players around him and wants that job (which will be open once their playoff run ends). However, it’s also a franchise with an ownership divided enough that they had to settle on a compromise GM last summer because they couldn’t agree and there was a power struggle. (Not to diminish Jon Horst, who I think has done a good job in that role.) Is that something Wright sees as comfortable enough to leave Villanova for? When Phoenix calls (and they will) would he trust that ownership and management? Should he?

If Wright does find a fit and heads to the NBA, there is little question that he has all the tools to be a success.

The biggest adjustment for many NCAA coaches coming to the NBA is the shift in power structure. In college, the head coach is the CEO of the program and has control over the recruitment and roster, he can control the schedule, and the rest. It’s a great job for a control freak or a big ego (think John Calipari). At the NBA level the coach is not the guy with the power — a star player will have far more say and has more value to the franchise. The GM picks the roster. And the coach has many more people to answer to.

Wright is a guy who can handle that, he’s not the guy with the oversized ego, nor is he the level of control freak some coaches are.

Maybe more importantly, front offices have seen player development at Villanova under Wright that is crucial in today’s NBA. He turned Mikal Bridges into a likely lottery pick in this draft, and Donte DiVincenzo into a Final Four hero — neither was a massively high recruit. That is needed in the NBA. Look at the Warriors and, with the exception of Kevin Durant, they drafted lower and developed Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, and Draymond Green (not to mention the rest of that roster). The teams that can sustain success develop players in house to at least be solid parts of the rotation (San Antonio is the gold standard, and you see it though coming up in Boston and Philadelphia).

On the court, you can see where Wright’s style would work, too. His teams play fast, he’s not afraid to go small, and he gets the need to use ball screens and actions to free up shooters. His teams also defend well. He can handle the Xs and Os.

The question with Wright isn’t can he be successful in the NBA, it’s does he want to make the leap?

The answer to that may be no, but suitors will come calling this summer.

NBA Media Day roundup: Zion looking fit, Ayton sounding reserved, more

Philadelphia 76ers Media Day
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Most of the NBA conducted media day on Monday — some moments turned our head.

Here’s what you need to know from media day around the league — just the highlights. This does not include anything on the Nets — there’s a separate story on them — or the Lakers (there will be a story Tuesday morning out of Lakers’ media day).

• The reports of Zion Williamson being in the best shape of his career appear to be true. HoodieBev has the recipts.

We’ll see if this translates to the court — there’s a lot of pressure on him — but Zion looks like he’s put in the work.

• Speaking of players who looked in better shape, James Harden looked slimmed down. He joked he lost 100 pounds, but he also talked about his diet and exercise regimen.

Deandre Ayton got a four-year, $132.9 million contract extension this summer, but not because the Suns were handing it out. Ayton had to get the Pacers to make the offer (which is why he doesn’t have a five-year deal) and then the Suns matched it. Ayton is a guy with a usually upbeat personality, but when asked about his new contract, it was a short answer and a low-key tone.

Coach Monty Williams and All-Star Devin Booker both talked about how they expect Ayton to use the contract as motivation and come out with a monster season. We’ll be watching.

• The Suns’ players and coach had to all answer the “what did you think of the Robert Sarver investigation report?” question, and the answers were unanimous — they were disgusted, saddened, and felt for those (especially the women) who had to deal with his behavior. They also to a man said they had no idea (which, at least before the original ESPN report, may have been true; how he acted around players and those on the business side appears to be different).

• All the Celtics were asked about their former coach Ime Udoka’s season-long suspension, and Marcus Smart summed up the sentiments well — “it’s been hell.” They were caught off guard like much of the NBA was. That said, to a man, they backed interim coach Joe Mazzulla.

• With P.J. Tucker out in Miami there has been a lot of talk about Jimmy Butler playing the four, especially to close games. Butler himself shot that down, saying he is not a four.

The Heat continue to look for a trade for a four, but may not have one to start the season.

• At his end-of-season media session last May, Pat Riley said Kyle Lowry needed to show up in better shape this season. It appears Lowry did, but did it motivate him? “It’s whatever… everyone has their opinion.”

• It’s not media day unless Kawhi Leonard is laughing.

As for Leonard and load management this season, coach Tyronne Lue said he would play it by ear. But also, expect some.

 

Report: Heat, Celtics, Mavericks, Grizzlies may show interest in Crowder trade

2022 NBA Playoffs - 	Dallas Mavericks v Phoenix Suns
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The Phoenix Suns had media day on Monday, but veteran Jae Crowder was not there, part of a mutual agreement with the team to sit out until a trade could be found. It left players and GM James Jones addressing the issue.

What teams are interested in Crowder? Shams Charania of The Athletic says to watch for the Heat, Celtics, Mavericks and Grizzlies among others.

Miami has been at the front of the line in terms of interest (and Crowder has suggested online he would welcome a return to Miami). The Heat have minutes to fill at the four after P.J. Tucker left for Philly and Crowder — who was on the Heat team that went to the bubble Finals against the Lakers — would be a solid fit. Putting together a trade is a little more tricky. The Heat would likely want Duncan Robinson at the core of the deal, but to make the salaries match the Suns would have to throw in another player — Dario Saric, Landry Shamet, Cameron Payne, Torey Craig — and that means the Heat have to throw in a pick (a protected first) or a minimum-contract player (Gabe Vincent?) to make the deal work. Not impossible, but not likely.

The Celtics need depth at the four but what they can offer is bench minutes, filling Danilo Gallinari‘s role (he is out for the season with a torn ACL) but putting together a trade is next to impossible financially considering who Boston would be willing to give up (not Robert Williams). Dallas could put together a deal if the Suns are interested in Dwight Powell (probably not, the Suns just paid Deandre Ayton a lot of money to be their center) or Reggie Bullock. Memphis could send out the dead money of the Danny Green contract (out for the season due to injury) and picks, or Ziaire Williamson and some minimum players (probably also with picks). Atlanta, Chicago and other destinations have come out in rumors.

As for why Crowder pushed for a trade, the man himself posted his own hype video on Instagram and Tweeted this.

ESPN’s Brian Windhorst reported the most heard speculation around the league as to the reason — the Suns were going to start Cameron Johnson at the four to have more shooting and Crowder wanted none of that — but the reason now is moot. Crowder will get traded.

The only questions are when and where.

Durant, Irving talk about Nets moving on from ‘very awkward’ summer, but drama continues

Brooklyn Nets Media Day
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Media Day — arguably the most boring and tedious day on the NBA calendar — was anything but in Brooklyn.

After a summer Kyrie Irving admitted was “very awkward” — where both he and Kevin Durant pushed to be traded, and Durant threw down an ultimatum saying it was him or coach Steve Nash and GM Sean Marks — everyone was back under one roof and trying to stay on message about just wanting to win.

But drama will follow this team like a dark cloud until they force the conversation to be about something else. Like how many games they are winning.

Until then, the awkward questions and moments will come. For example, why did Kevin Durant ask for a trade this summer? What did he want to see changed? He talked about the team feeling unstable last season. Which it was (for a variety of reasons).

“My whole thing was, I wanted everybody to be held accountable for their habits as a basketball player. I think a lot of stuff was getting swept under the rug because we’re injured or this guy’s not around or just the circumstances. I thought we could have fought through that a little bit more and focused on the guys that were here a little bit more.

“You know, when I went out with the injury, we lost 10 in a row. And I’m like, we shouldn’t be losing some of these games that we lost, regardless of who’s on the floor. So I was more so worried about how we’re approaching every day as a basketball team. And I felt like we could have fought through a lot of the stuff that I felt that held us back.”

Those are the best, drama-free answers he could give. But Durant still loves to stir the pot on Twitter and did so later in the day.

(That was the question asked boiled way down, but both the question and Durant’s answer had a lot more context, it was not a confrontational answer in the moment.)

Kyrie Irving said there were options for him this summer, although limited ones, because he is unvaccinated. He also talked about the reasons he wanted to return to the Nets.

Marks handled the inevitable “your star wanted you fired” questions as well as he could, saying at one point “that’s pro sports.”

“Everybody’s entitled to their opinions and I think from us, it’s not to hold a grudge against what Kevin said, but it’s a little bit of saying, ‘All right, if that’s the way he feels, what’s going on here?’ Like, what do we need to change?” Marks said.

In the end, everyone talked about moving on and the potential for this roster. Durant is not disappointed to be back.

“I wasn’t disappointed. I still love to play. I knew that wasn’t going to get affected regardless of what happened this summer,” Durant said.

The Nets have the talent on the roster to be title contenders, but have more questions than any other team at that level after the past couple of years: Can Durant stay healthy? Will Irving be focused and committed for an entire season? How does Ben Simmons fit in and what is his role? Can their thin frontcourt hold up? Will they play enough defense? Is Steve Nash up to the task? Does this team have the will and drive to be contenders?

Playing through the drama is the only way to answer all those questions, but if they do this team could be a powerhouse.

PBT Podcast: Golden State Warriors season preview

2022 NBA Finals - Golden State Warriors v Boston Celtics
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The Golden State Warriors will enter the season hanging banner number four from this era and passing out their championship rings, but this is a team with more questions than most returning champs.

Otto Porter and Gary Payton II are gone and their minutes will go to a young core — Jordan Poole, Moses Moody, Jonathan Kuminga, James Wiseman — who are going to be asked to carry a larger load. Particularly during the regular season.

Dalton Johnson of NBC Sports Bay Area joins Kurt Helin of NBC Sports to break down this coming Warriors season, what to expect, and if the young core can get the older vets to the playoffs rested and ready to defend their title. There’s also talk of what comes next in Golden State, as some hard contract choices are coming in the next few years.

You can always watch the video of some of the podcast above, or listen to the entire podcast below, listen and subscribe via iTunes at ApplePodcasts.com/PBTonNBC, subscribe via the fantastic Stitcher app, check us out on Google Play, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

We want your questions for future podcasts, and your comments, so please feel free to email us at PBTpodcast@gmail.com.