Trail Blazers still paying for last summer’s mistakes – but far less

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NBCSports.com’s Dan Feldman is grading every team’s offseason based on where the team stands now relative to its position entering the offseason. A ‘C’ means a team is in similar standing, with notches up or down from there.

If given the ability, how of the contracts signed last year would the Trail Blazers undo?

Evan Turner (four years, $70 million)? Absolutely.

Festus Ezeli ($7.4 million in year one plus another $1 million guaranteed in year two)? Unquestionably.

Meyers Leonard (four years, $41 million)? Highly likely.

Maurice Harkless (four years, $42 million)? Probably not, but at least maybe.

Allen Crabbe (four years, $74.8 million)? Apparently.

Portland unloaded Crabbe on the Nets,  even taking back and stretching Andrew Nicholson‘s (smaller) toxic contract in the process. The Trail Blazers’ main move of the summer puts them in line to save more than $55 million between salary and luxury tax this season. They’ll also save the next two years, when the tax will remain an issue for them.

Whether that’s a good thing depends on your perspective.

For ownership, that’s clearly huge savings. But the trade cleared no cap space, and the mid-level exception still sits untouched. Crabbe, Portland’s lone reliably plus 3-point shooter besides Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum will be missed on the court.

But acquiring Jusuf Nurkic before last season’s trade deadline, not factored into this grade, allows the Trail Blazers to still paint themselves as a rising team rather than one just dumping rotation players to save money. Nurkic was awesome down the stretch before getting hurt, and a full season with him at center could vault Portland back on track.

Importantly, the Trail Blazers surrendered no draft picks to Brooklyn, which signed Crabbe to the offer sheet in the first place. It seemed clearing any of their bad contracts would require significant sweeteners. Paying Nicholson $2,844,430 through 2024 is a minor inconvenience, all things considered.

Dumping salary was a reasonable measure considering the tax burden and team quality, and Portland did it deftly.

Trading the Nos. 15 and 20 picks to move up for Zach Collins at No. 10 before this draft fell off looked solid, though Collins’ summer-league struggles give pause. Collins and No. 26 pick Caleb Swanigan will provide insurance if Nurkic, Noah Vonleh and/or Ed Davis depart when their contracts expire next summer. Davis might even get moved sooner if the Trail Blazers try to dodge the luxury tax entirely this season.

Portland went all-in last offseason for a team that went .500 and got swept in the first round. The Trail Blazers return a little worse than the Nurkic-infused squad that soared late – but also a whole lot cheaper.

Offseason grade: B-